Archive for the ‘Physics’ Category

Two Clues to the Origin of Life

November 17, 2017

Two big CLUES to how life began on Earth.

1. There had to be continual energy.

Because of the energetic continuity requirement – which follows from the Darwinian evolutionary continuity principle (see Lahav (1999); Wolf and Koonin
(2007) and references therein) – the energy flows that deserve attention in evolu-
tionary context are those that remain constant on the evolutionary relevant, geolog-
ical timescale. This consideration essentially discounts the evolutionary importance of occasional energy inputs from impact bombardment, atmospheric electric
discharges, shock waves, volcanic explosions, and so on. It is also unlikely that life could notably depend on the chemical compounds that were produced or delivered during such occasional events. It seems implausible that the first life
forms could wait from one occasional event (e.g., volcanic explosion) to another to get energy and nourishment. There are no known organisms that obligatorily depend on such irregular sources of energy and matter.

2. Bases and UV.

The exclusive feature of natural
nucleobases is their unique photostability (Cadet and Vigny 1990). Since this trait is not related to the storage of genetic information, several authors (Skulachev 1969; Sagan 1973; Cadet and Vigny 1990) have noted that this property could have
been of some use when the UV flux at the surface of primordial Earth – owing to the absence of the ozone layer – was much stronger than it is now. Nucleobases apparently can absorb excess energy quanta from sugar-phosphate moieties and protect them from photo-dissociation (Goossen and Kloosterboer 1978). This feature explains why the UV damage to the backbones even of modern RNA and DNA molecules is 103–104 times less frequent than the destruction of nucleobases proper (Cadet and Vigny 1990). Under the assumption that the unique photostability of nucleobases could hardly be incidental, we have argued that
natural nucleotides should have been selected within the reach of solar light and that nucleobases may have protected the first RNA-like polymers from photo- dissociation (Mulkidjanian et al. 2003).

Both quotes from Mulkidhanian papers.

My suggestion is that life is the most stable chemical system under daily UV radiation. The problem with most origin of life scenarios is that there is nothing forcing the change except fate or fluke events. That problem is solved when the origin of live is a response to a daily cycle of UV. Then chemical systems have to change and adopt or they are destroyed.

Which is more probable, a one time pop up of 5 or so linked chemical steps that each have to occur in the proper order in a hostile environment that they are not protected in and that would quickly destroy each step, OR a chemical selection over millions of years of UV radiation?

My paper:
http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html

For everything else see the website
tomhendricks.us

Advertisements

Patent Office (sci-fi cartoon)

September 1, 2017

tomhendricks.us

Gravity = Perpetual Energy Machine

August 8, 2017

GRAVITY = Perpetual Energy Machine

(or to be more exact
Gravity = Perpetual Force Machine OR
Gravity = Perpetual Motion Machine.

(For more wacky physics – and what physics nowadays is not – see my sci-fi novel Writings in Science) tomhendricks.us

Light and Time, Question for a Physicistd

June 14, 2017

Sent this question about LIGHT AND TIME, to ASK A MATHEMATICIAN See there website at
askamathematician.com

My Question.
Light is outside time, but if it enters a Bose Einstein Condensate, it slows down. How do we reconcile that the photon is both outside time, but slows down?

Their Answer.
There’s a post here that talks about that a bit.

http://www.askamathematician.com/2013/07/q-what-does-it-mean-for-light-to-be-stopped-or-stored/

Basically, when light exists, it’s traveling at c. When light “slows down”, then at least part of the time it’s not light. In the experiments where light is “stopped” it would be more accurate to say that it is “stored”. Very carefully prepared condensates (not just any old condensate) stops light kinda like a vinyl record stops sound (kinda). Hope that helps!
-Physicist

Writings in Science, Sci-fi, First 5 Reviews

December 9, 2016

Writings in Science Synopsis and Reviews.

Synopsis Writings in Science, a History of the Future, is a vast sci-
fi novel written in stories, essays, poems, and plays. Here is the premise; during the last days of our planet, before he boards a rescue rocket, a man named “I” collects his favorite writings in science to remember Earth.
This is a large sci-fi book that covers a lot of science, with many amazing stories, characters, drama, and clever comedy. It does all this in a format of assorted stories, essays, poems and plays, that collectively tell a bigger story.

https://readersfavorite.com/book-review/writings-in-science

FIVE REVIEWS,

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement.. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job.

This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

The first thing I can say about this book by Tom Hendricks is wow.

It is hard to know where to start in sharing my thoughts on this book other than just how much I enjoyed it.

Writings in Science: A History of the Future can’t be read as a novel with a linear plot; no, it’s a compendium of beautiful writings depicting the future of humankind and the world human beings inhabit.

Tom Hendricks is a gifted writer, and there is no doubt that his stories, essays and drama are very provocative, especially for readers who love rethinking the future. I will surely be going back to read some of my favorite parts.

Writings in Science: A History of the Future by Tom Hendricks is a dazzling portrait of the world millions of years from now, as seen through the eyes of the character called “I.” It is the kind of sci-fi that can be characterized as visionary.

The author shows a lot of ingenuity in creating new cultures and governments, offering access to other planets, but it is what humankind does in the face of extreme adversity that will capture the hearts of readers.

It’s a work that will be adored by fans of sci-fi, short stories, futuristic essays and fantasy.

A History of the Future by Tom Hendricks is a beautiful collection of stories, dialogues, essays, and many things in between, depicting the world millions of years in the future.

Readers will enjoy the drama that features in the stories, the tight prose in the essays, and the compelling, somewhat symbolic characters. Tom Hendricks exhibits a very rich imagination in this entertaining work.

The author covers a variety of themes in a variety of styles, including ethical issues, scientific inventions, culture and politics.

The Setting is captivating. I was drawn in by the images the author conjured through the beautiful writing.

FULL REVIEWS

Reviewed By Ray Simmons for Readers’ Favorite

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement.. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job.

This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

Writings in Science (A History of the Future) by Tom Hendricks is billed as A Novel of Stories, Essays, Poems, and Plays. This is probably, at least structurally speaking, one of the most experimental novels I have read in a long time. Many sections read like the musings of an intelligent human being who thinks quite a lot about science, man, art, the universe, and the future. That man would be author Tom Hendricks. At around 400 pages, this is a lot of serious but sometimes whimsical musing. It is organized into “bottles” instead of chapters. (I told you it was experimental.) It is huge in scope, imagining a dying Earth millions of years in the future, and a protagonist running around collecting these literary tidbits as a history of Earth. This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job. I enjoyed the essays more than I did the poems, plays, or stories. He hit on some topics that I have written on myself, and even came to a similar conclusion sometimes. The poems, jokes, and plays are good and, though I prefer straightforward prose in a novel for the most part, I found this a very interesting book.


%d bloggers like this: