Archive for the ‘abstract art’ Category

Raining Down, recording and video by Greebly Mork

March 3, 2020

"Raining Down", is a brand new recording of a song of mine, by Greebly Mork.
Here is the link to his version and youtube video. Then under it I’ve added a link to my rough youtube demo. When you listen, I recommend you use your headphones and you’ll get the richest sound experience on both.

Raining Down, Greebly Mork
https://youtu.be/9G58_20tWWs

Raining Down, Hunkasaurus & His Pet Dog Guitar
https://youtu.be/ZxY4R4PeyfE

Greebly Mork is, not only a talented musician, arranger, etct; he is the moderator of an online Face Book music group called, "Reinventing the Wheel". The group may be virtually the only place most musicians can get a review of their music!
Mork has set up this basic rule; before a musician posts his song, he has to review and comment on 3 other songs. That has worked well. Visitors will find lots of great music from about 100 musicians so far; and each song posted on the site, is packed with lots of comments.

This is my review of "Raining Down" by Greebly Mork:

Wow! There is a lot here I wanted to talk about. Your version is topnotch studio work, compared to my rough live demo; so, listening to your version in headphones is a real treat. You get that professional crisp fullness, plus a solid clear separation of parts.
I liked the simple intro that gets things started, and keeps things in a basic form up to the big choruses, with those multi vocals you are celebrated for.
But what was a real delight to me is how you use the background vocals to, not double track the lead, but to add a second answering melody line to the chorus. That was really sweet!
Good guitar work on the middle. I like the 3 or 4 different leads that built up before the song goes back to the verses.
I may be just imagining this, but the second revised version I listened to, seemed more lean on instruments on the verses, which
gives the choruses more punch. You mentioned minor changes – was there some changes like that too?
The one thing that surprised me the most is your version sounds more optimistic than mine, believe it or not! That’s the fun of hearing another’s take.
Now every review has to have one negative – and here it is: I did NOT see the 11 measure’s long, vocal belting, "OHHHHHHHHHH" at the end on your version! But I’ll let that slide as artistic differences! LOL

Thanks for doing this! It’s a big treat to hear one’s song done up so well!

Pinterest Art Gallery

June 14, 2019

Dear Readers,

Pinterest, the social media for visuals, has a full gallery of my art works.

Find 350+ in one board I titled, “Revolution in Arts” under my name Tom Hendricks.

See what you think.

Tom Hendricks

Looking at the Painting

January 5, 2019

Question about Rothko

October 12, 2017

Joe Underwood, asked me the following question about a Mark Rothko painting.

“Hi Tom. Can you explain to me how to appreciate these colored rectangles. I have some difficulty with some abstract art, but simple pieces like these give me the most trouble.

Joe, I’ll give it a try, and I thought I’d share what I say to others on my blog, because you are not the only one that feels this way.

First, you don’t have to like it, and that is very important. There are two parts to great art, one is the well seasoned opinions and commentary of many in the art field as to which artists stand out, and the other is whether you the viewer like them or not.

I appreciate great artists, but don’t LIKE most of them for one reason or another. And the ones I do love, often have paintings that I don’t care for, while other paintings of theirs, I just adore. I also often like bad paintings for one reason or another, and that’s fine too.

So not liking any artist or any painting is your personal choice. But I think it is also important to understand why many think a painter is worthy of appreciation whether you and I like or don’t like them And many do think Rothko is a very great painter.

So now we come to the other part. Whether you like him or not, the question is; why do others appreciate this artist and his work. What do they see in it that is worthy.

First I wrote this short essay for all people who have questions about any abstract art. https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/01/18/short-essay-on-abstract-art/

This will show you how painters can put a great amount of emotion and feeling into an abstract painting.

BTW, I paint both abstracts and realism, and abstracts are just as difficult or sometimes harder. For example, with great abstract works, every inch of the painting has to work together. You don’t have to do that with realism. I think abstract works are very difficult, and I think most so called abstract artists are not very good!

Now back to Mark Rothko. He is one of my favorites, and I think I can tell you why. I’ve even painted in that manner and will add an example later.

Google Mark Rothko. Now press the Images button up near the top. What you will see is a lot of his works. Take a look at the page and maybe the next and the next after.

There is a lot of color there. With some paintings the color works together to make a harmonious painting. Some the colors clash and make a more upsetting painting.
If I asked you to find the most cheerful painting on the page could you? What about the most dreary? I bet you could, because color and shape can do that.

Rothko didn’t start out with these blocks of color. That developed. His early work is not my favorite. It doesn’t really stand out from any of the other painters in that style. But I love much of this later work, like the piece that started this conversation.

First of all his paintings are big. And like many meditative things, they are simple, and for me and many others, profound, zen like, spiritual. The blocks and the field of color they seem to float in, could symbolize ying and yang, male and female, light and dark, yes and no, etc., but whatever you see, there is something more than just color to his best paintings .

Finally imagine this. You go to a chapel to meditate. Behind the altar is a large painting. It is big enough to envelope your eyes so that that is most all you see. You kneel and look up.

Which would lend itself to a more reflective experience, one of Rothko’s paintings with these huge nebulous blocks of floating color, or say a realistic portrait of a religious figure?

Take your favorite from these 3 pages of his works, and imagine that in your mind, full sized, behind the altar of the chapel. What do you think?

Hope this helps,
Tom

Abstracts (art set)

April 9, 2014

This art set is 6 abstract artworks.  Please enjoy.

3 shapes

 

3 Shapes

The pipes the pipes are calling ....

The pipes the pipes are calling ….

red black and white

Red, Black, and White

Puzzle

Puzzle

galax

Galaxies

Neon

Neon Lights

3 symbols

3

 

 


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