Archive for the ‘arts’ Category

Lift a Finger – literally!

December 2, 2017

Lift a finger, literally!

Right now no artist outside the corporate few, is getting fair reviews. Time for you to give your review by lifting a finger – literally. How?

Lift a finger and click on ‘LIKE” on the music, videos, books, art, film, that you like.

By literally lifting a finger you help a lot. You help the artist know that he is being recognized for his work, you acknowledge that you appreciate his effort, and you further his career.

So come on, lift a finger. That is NOT asking too much. Like 10-50 times a day, every day. It will do you good, and help the artists you like, a lot!

For those who want to go further:

Here’s some other things you can do.

1. Pass the word that about 6 giant media companies have done great harm to all the arts. Example: music, radio, concerts, music media, and music online. Just talking about it helps all artists everywhere.
2. Support the Dallas arts and media revolution, or anyone else that is actively against all this.
3. Contact your favorite news site and ask why they won’t talk about the arts revolution.
4. Support Pennies for Play, a way for any musician to stream music for pennies on his website without any middlemen.

Thanks, from all artists everywhere.
Tom Hendricks
(editor of the 25 year old zine Musea)

MAIN Website
http://tomhendricks.us/

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Sayings of Editor Art (on everything!)

November 23, 2017

Can’t live in the past – but you can visit!

I wasn’t born in Texas but I got here as quick as I could.

Hollywood is great at blowing up things – specially budgets

You don’t hit people you love. You hit people you want to control.

There are two media, 1. that props up a few mega corporations with press releases disguised as journalism, and the other that reports on what you want to know.

Bacteria were the first Earthlings to land on other planets.

Every couple is crazy but somehow they make allowances.

Great fashion is both style and substance.

I don’t mind ghosts, they don’t take up any room.

Journalism – part of the job is to keep thinkgs in perspective instead of going off on a new tangent/scandal every 2 week.

The Three Music corporations (Warners, Universal, Sony control 80% of the music industry) will sooner or later buy up or shut down any successful music start up.

I’ve read books on art history but no one talks about smiles. It took centuries before painters allowed subjects to smile in their portraits. The evolution of smiles in painting is a key development in art.

I hate flashbacks – nothing changes.

Let books memorize, you learn!

Don’t beat your head against a wall. It’s not good for the wall, and it knows better.

Universe in the Basement, phrase that means the universe within each of us with it’s endless boundaries.

A beauty that comes from a passion for life.

Whoa, there are now more writers than readers!

The brighter the light, the darker the shadow.

Yes honor your ancestors but the last think you want to do is honor their racism.

No meaning to life? Then you make one up, and the fact that we can means something!

Should the music media cover what they want to promote or what we want to hear?

The 3 Major record companies have sewed up vinyl production.

Two kinds of scenes in movies, the first moves the plot along, the second spotlights the actors.

Two kinds of fashion, the first is the basics, t-shirts, pants, underwear, the second is dress up clothes and accessories.

Radio is playing what they want to promote, not what we want to hear.

Teens listen to me. You are supossed to be miserable during these years. If you are you are right on track and perfectly normal. Just ride the storm and get help when you need it. Your life will get better.

If a painting becomes too precise or too finished looking it becomes prissy.

Media to victim: “What question can I ask you to make you cry on air?”

Media, First there was four word journalism, where you asked, “What do you think?” Now it is worse. It is, “What do you feel?” journalism.

Why is anybody living in Houston, haven’t they been there before?

IF the origin of life was difficult then we are most likely not here. If the origin of life was not difficult then we are most likely here.
The fact that we ARE here suggests that the origin of life was most likely not difficult.

Musea, the most progressive publication in Dallas for 25 years.

Suggestion: the over washing and over medicating of cuts and other minor ailments on our body may destroy part of the healthy microbiome that protects us from worse diseases.

Eating the right foods may enhance good gut bacteria and decrease the impact of bad bacteria; while, eating the wrong foods may enhance bad gut bacteria and decrease the impact of good bacteria.

For everything else see tomhendricks.us

Question about Rothko

October 12, 2017

Joe Underwood, asked me the following question about a Mark Rothko painting.

“Hi Tom. Can you explain to me how to appreciate these colored rectangles. I have some difficulty with some abstract art, but simple pieces like these give me the most trouble.

Joe, I’ll give it a try, and I thought I’d share what I say to others on my blog, because you are not the only one that feels this way.

First, you don’t have to like it, and that is very important. There are two parts to great art, one is the well seasoned opinions and commentary of many in the art field as to which artists stand out, and the other is whether you the viewer like them or not.

I appreciate great artists, but don’t LIKE most of them for one reason or another. And the ones I do love, often have paintings that I don’t care for, while other paintings of theirs, I just adore. I also often like bad paintings for one reason or another, and that’s fine too.

So not liking any artist or any painting is your personal choice. But I think it is also important to understand why many think a painter is worthy of appreciation whether you and I like or don’t like them And many do think Rothko is a very great painter.

So now we come to the other part. Whether you like him or not, the question is; why do others appreciate this artist and his work. What do they see in it that is worthy.

First I wrote this short essay for all people who have questions about any abstract art. https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/01/18/short-essay-on-abstract-art/

This will show you how painters can put a great amount of emotion and feeling into an abstract painting.

BTW, I paint both abstracts and realism, and abstracts are just as difficult or sometimes harder. For example, with great abstract works, every inch of the painting has to work together. You don’t have to do that with realism. I think abstract works are very difficult, and I think most so called abstract artists are not very good!

Now back to Mark Rothko. He is one of my favorites, and I think I can tell you why. I’ve even painted in that manner and will add an example later.

Google Mark Rothko. Now press the Images button up near the top. What you will see is a lot of his works. Take a look at the page and maybe the next and the next after.

There is a lot of color there. With some paintings the color works together to make a harmonious painting. Some the colors clash and make a more upsetting painting.
If I asked you to find the most cheerful painting on the page could you? What about the most dreary? I bet you could, because color and shape can do that.

Rothko didn’t start out with these blocks of color. That developed. His early work is not my favorite. It doesn’t really stand out from any of the other painters in that style. But I love much of this later work, like the piece that started this conversation.

First of all his paintings are big. And like many meditative things, they are simple, and for me and many others, profound, zen like, spiritual. The blocks and the field of color they seem to float in, could symbolize ying and yang, male and female, light and dark, yes and no, etc., but whatever you see, there is something more than just color to his best paintings .

Finally imagine this. You go to a chapel to meditate. Behind the altar is a large painting. It is big enough to envelope your eyes so that that is most all you see. You kneel and look up.

Which would lend itself to a more reflective experience, one of Rothko’s paintings with these huge nebulous blocks of floating color, or say a realistic portrait of a religious figure?

Take your favorite from these 3 pages of his works, and imagine that in your mind, full sized, behind the altar of the chapel. What do you think?

Hope this helps,
Tom

Last Moment of Modern Art?

October 1, 2017

THE LAST MINUTE OF MODERN ART (reprint from Musea)

Can CONCEPTUAL ART be used to end the abuses of conceptual art?

It all began this way. I was walking home from a taco place and thinking about Martin Creed and his Art Prize. He won the annual Turner Prize that goes to the best art work from a British artist yonger than 50. The prize was a check for $31,500 that was handed to him by Madonna.

And what was his art? Now this is hard to even say – even let the words sputter out of my mouth. The reason being I, too, am an artist. I have been one for decades, have studied and copied the masters, done work in almost every media (pencil, acrylics, and colored pencils are my favorites). And I worked hard to have some scope to my art whether portraits, landscapes, still lifes, abstracts, or just about everything in between. I love the stuff. I breathe art. I love to know everything there is to know about art and artists.

So what was HIS art? He got the yard-wide novelty check from Madonna (representing a couple years of my income) for his exhibit of flashing light bulbs in an empty room! (His previous works include a scrunched- up piece of paper and a ball of clay stuck to a wall).

British art curator Simon Wilson notes: “He wants to make art where he is doing as little as possible that is consistent with doing something. The fact that many people find his work so baffling indicates that he’s working on the edge.”
Oh I see. Now I am getting it. Now I am figuring out the “NEW” rules. Creed himself comments, “If I can make something without adding any objects, I feel more comfortable.”

And then it DAWNED ON ME. I would bring modern art to its end. I would suggest the ultimate. The ultimate in baffling minimalism. I would get the ‘plastic’ check from Madonna.

So on TUESDAY 1/08/02, at 1:30-1:40 PM, as I, Tom Hendricks, was walking home from the taco place, I took art to its ultimate. This was the last minute of modern art. It could go no further. Where Creed had flashing lights in an empty room, I would … IMAGINE A GALLERY IN MY MIND THAT WOULD HAVE NO LIGHTS ON AT ALL! And that moment marked the end of modern art.

For all information see: tomhendricks.us

The River (two versions)

September 19, 2017

The River


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