Archive for the ‘3 CEO’s’ Category

The Blockers

March 15, 2019

The Blockers.

These are media sources, advocacy groups, etc. that do not talk about progressive music, musicians, or music ideas. Why? Time to ask them! Readers suggest others you think should be on the list.

To get your name off the list, report the news in a way that is fair to all.

1 NPR (radio)
2. Dallas Observer (media)
3 Dallas Morning News (media)
4. KERA (radio)
5. Commercial Stations (radio / tv)
6. KNON (Dallas music radio station)
7. Texas Music Office (gov. org.)
8. KERA (radio)
9. Texas Music Magazine
10. TYT, the Young Turks (media watchdog)
11. Project Censored (media watchdog)
12. FAIR (media watchdog)
13. Texas Standard (radio news.)
14. Takeaway (radio news.)
15. Billboard (music media)
16. Rolling Stone, Spin, etc. (music media)
17. SXSW (music festival)
18. Digital Music News (music media).
19. BBC (and all foreign press.)
20. Pop Culture Happy Hour (radio show)
21. Think (Dallas radio show).
22. All Songs Considered (radio show)
23. KXT ( Dallas music radio station.)
24. The Tech giants (all of them that deal with music.)

Ralph Nader looks at NPr and PBS

February 19, 2019

Dear Reader,

Search out the link for “The Realized Temptation of NPR and PBS” by Ralph Nader. He addresses a lot of my concerns in their media fairness. I would add that the problem includes all their art coverage too.
Right now all songs are NOT considered, and they actively block any progressive music, musicians, or music ideas connected with the music revolution.

Tom Hendricks

More Opinion on the Quality of Music

February 8, 2019

This comment from writer, Jerry Coyne,
Thanks to JHC for recommending it to me.

https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com/2019/02/07/yet-another-music-expert-and-critic-says-that-todays-popular-songs-suck/

The tide is turning. Join the Music Revolution.

Pan and Zheng (short short story)

February 5, 2019

Pan and Zheng

1.

This is a story by Shao Baojian. I have changed the details but it turns out the same.

The setting is a mid sized, smog filled, city; in a medium sized country with a quickly growing population.

Some old people there remembered a time, not too far back, when it was against the law to show affection in public. Yes, women could cuddle their children, and old men could embrace and hug after being reunited, but no more than that!

Now public displays of affection between a man and a woman was allowed, but frowned on as being forward, or foreign!

2.

Picture at the end of a half paved road, crowded with tiny stores, and multi family houses, a small apartment building.

This building was somewhat bland and unadorned, but well kept up. It was rectangle shaped, two story, and had ten apartments. Eight of those were families and two housed singles.

Looking at the front of the building the two singles lived on the upper floor on the far left side. Second from the end lived a bachelor named Zheng Ruokui. And at the end was a spinster named Pan Xuee.

Each morning the two would meet on the stairs on their way to work. He would speak first by saying, “Good morning,” with a pleasant smile. Then she would respond by asking, “Going out?” with another smile.

These were the only two sentences anyone in the neighborhood ever heard from them! And that is all the more surprising when one learns that some living here were gossips of the first rank!

3.

Pan was a woman in her late 30’s or early 40’s. Her cute features had lost a little of their softness from age. Her skin had tightened and her muscles had gotten leaner from repeated work. Her face was oval with balanced features. She had a fine complexion, pretty teeth, big eyes, and rich black, long, straight, hair. Her build was a bit skinny and fragile looking; but she was always ready to roll up her sleeves and lend a hand to the neighborhood.

She worked at the big flower shop on Western Street, the wide road that led to downtown.

Zheng was in his mid 40’s. He looked older with a bit of a stoop, black rimmed glasses, messy matted hair, and always a breakout or two on his face, that he’d scratch. He had medium height and weight with, narrow shoulders. His fingers were long and thin, and he often held his hands behind his back when he talked. But he was also bright, alert, and he had a way of telling news with a laugh, like it was a story.

Zheng worked for a theater chain. The job of his team was to paint murals on the walls. There wasn’t much originality in the work, because he had to follow a specific pattern that was the same in every theater.

Besides a movie now and then, Zheng didn’t go out much. He liked to stay at home and read, or paint watercolors. Many hung on his walls, and one had won him a prize in an amateur painting contest.

His room had a narrow bed, two straight backed chairs, a large and a small table, and in the center against the thick wall that he shared with Pan, a very large bookcase as tall as a man.

Those who came to his apartment always commented on the huge bookcase. It stood out. Besides books, magazines, and letters, the bookcase had a shoulder high shelf in the middle, near the top, that was perfect for displaying his precious flower vase.

He owned a blue translucent, family heirloom, flower vase, that he made sure was always clean, polished, and filled with fresh flowers.

4.

One cloudy drizzly day Pan and Zheng met on the stairs, talked as they always did, and separated. That was the last time they met.

Later that day, Zheng was painting on a scaffold when his heart beat became irregular. He called for help. His co workers rushed him to the hospital, but he lost consciousness and died in route.

Soon everyone at the apartments had heard the awful news. Zheng had died. Pan said nothing but her eyes were very red and puffy.

5.

People brought flowers to remember Zheng. The largest bouquet was from Pan. A few days later she quickly packed and suddenly moved away.

One week later family, friends, and neighbors, came together to go through Zheng’s belongings. They were surprised at what they saw.

Dust was layered on everything except the blue vase. That was sparkling clean and full of still fresh, white, chrysanthemums.

When some of the men pulled the large bookcase from the wall they got another surprise. Behind it was a door – an elegant, big, red, door with a bright polished brass handle!

Tongues wagged! The place buzzed like a beehive – noisy with the news that quickly passed through the crowd!

As people talked, the mood changed, and those who had felt kind respect for the bachelor; now felt betrayed; as if he had secretly made fools of them all, and had led a double life …

But then just as quickly, came another surprise. A boy tried to open the door. The brass handle was flat and smooth as the wall itself. So was the frame and the hinges!

The door was painted on the wall!

1% Musicians Should Pay 70% of the Donations

July 24, 2018

Dear Readers,

This post looks at musicians and charity.

Did you know that 1% of musicians make 70% of all the money?
They do. Most are the ten or so teen pop stars that are constantly promoted over and over, year after year. The rest are touring classic rock acts you’ve seen touring year after year.

I don’t like the disparity and want to see an end to it. But until the music revolution sweeps in, we are stuck with it.

So in this post I speak directly to the one percenters, the musicians that make 70% of the money in the music industry..

Guess what, there is a responsibility with making 70% of all the money in the music industry. You have to give 70% of all charity donations from all musicians in the music industry. Let me repeat.

You have to give 70% of all charity donations from all musicians in the music industry.

That means even a million here and there is far from enough. When you make such massive amounts of money, your 10 percent is many millions.

Step up and do your share – your 70% of the entire giving!

Tom Hendricks


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