Archive for the ‘Art Revolution’ Category

We All Agree Right?

January 13, 2018

Sure hope the music stays the same as we’ve had for the last 10 years. We need 10 more years of that music that is always the same sounding electric keyboards, drum machines, and auto tuned vocals. What music could be more original? Nothing should change. Music should never change! Sure hope there is no progressive music to challenge this teen pop by the handful of wonderful aging teen pop stars that the music media talks about over and over and over and over.

And above all else there must be no mention of the music revolution sweeping the country out of Dallas. We need the sameness that keeps radio so good on every channel, concert tickets so low and fun to purchase, streaming payments so high, awards shows that award the most promoted, and reviews that praise this safe bland music over and over. What we don’t need is music rebels that want to change any of this for the better!
There must be no one to question why the music sounds alike, why 1% of musicians make 70% of the money, why 3 CEOs that control 80% of the music are all men, with no women allowed, and why the musicians most love are marginalized out of careers. We must support the music industry that keeps 99% of musicians making minimum wage at best by selling a few CDs and t-shirts to half empty clubs.

Continue to support the very few at the expense of all the rest! We all agree right? … or do we?

Tom Hendricks
tomhendricks.us

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Work Smarter, Not Harder

January 9, 2018

Work smarter, not work harder, says the motto.

My response, yes. Too often people advise others that hard work is enough. But that does not always work.

Here is an example: you go to a bank and ask for free money. They say no. Not working hard enough! You have to try one hundred, or one thousands banks!

This is a problem I see in all the arts. Musicians, writers, filmmakers, artists, etc., all not seeing that how much you work won’t change a system that has become unfair to so many.

Corporations, through media consolidation, have the upper hand in all these industries, and they push profit over quality. Work hard, and work smart. Rebel against the system or you are just asking banks for free money.

Many seem to settle for all the arts to be ruined because of business demands for profit. And they allow their favorite musicians, writers, artists, filmmakers to be marginalized out of fair reviews and careers. For some reason, too many now think that if THEY can search out and find an elusive great talent, that is enough. It is not.

Virtually every talented musician, painter, writer, filmmaker, etc that you have to search for, is making minimum wage. Great talent should be the most celebrated, not the most marginalized.

The history of art has never been like this before. The best art has always been the most talked about, written about, and reviewed. The entire art world is upside down. That is why the art revolution to change it.

Tom Hendricks, tomhendricks.us

Christmas Posts on my Facebook Page

December 23, 2017

Merry Christmas to all.

To celebrate this holiday season, I’m doing what I did last year. I am reposting on my Facebook page 100 of my saved Christmas posts.

That is Christmas related posts (humor, music, fashion, culture, etc.) each day of the 23rd, 24th, and 25th. There are so many that I hope you will find a few you like.

See my facebook page for all 100 and any you might have missed and tell your friends and family.

Tom Hendricks
(editor of the 25 year old zine Musea)

MAIN Website
http://tomhendricks.us/

Must Make Profits at All Costs !!!

December 12, 2017

Corporations Don’t Have to Maximize Profits / NYT article.

These five quotes are from Lynn Stout, professor of corporate and business law at Cornell Law School. Updated April 16, 2015, 6:46 AM

There is a common belief that corporate directors have a legal duty to maximize corporate profits and “shareholder value” — even if this means skirting ethical rules, damaging the environment or harming employees. But this belief is utterly false …

Serving shareholders’ “best interests” is not the same thing as either maximizing profits, or maximizing shareholder value. …

The business judgment rule gives directors protection from judicial second-guessing about how to best serve their companies and shareholders….

… the business judgment rule gives directors nearly absolute protection from judicial second-guessing about how to best serve the company and its shareholders…

In other words, it is activist hedge funds and modern executive compensation practices — not corporate law — that drive so many of today’s public companies to myopically focus on short-term earnings; cut back on investment and innovation; mistreat their employees, customers and communities; and indulge in reckless, irresponsible and environmentally destructive behaviors.

Lift a Finger – literally!

December 2, 2017

Lift a finger, literally!

Right now no artist outside the corporate few, is getting fair reviews. Time for you to give your review by lifting a finger – literally. How?

Lift a finger and click on ‘LIKE” on the music, videos, books, art, film, that you like.

By literally lifting a finger you help a lot. You help the artist know that he is being recognized for his work, you acknowledge that you appreciate his effort, and you further his career.

So come on, lift a finger. That is NOT asking too much. Like 10-50 times a day, every day. It will do you good, and help the artists you like, a lot!

For those who want to go further:

Here’s some other things you can do.

1. Pass the word that about 6 giant media companies have done great harm to all the arts. Example: music, radio, concerts, music media, and music online. Just talking about it helps all artists everywhere.
2. Support the Dallas arts and media revolution, or anyone else that is actively against all this.
3. Contact your favorite news site and ask why they won’t talk about the arts revolution.
4. Support Pennies for Play, a way for any musician to stream music for pennies on his website without any middlemen.

Thanks, from all artists everywhere.
Tom Hendricks
(editor of the 25 year old zine Musea)

MAIN Website
http://tomhendricks.us/


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