Archive for the ‘Math’ Category

Light and Time, Question for a Physicistd

June 14, 2017

Sent this question about LIGHT AND TIME, to ASK A MATHEMATICIAN See there website at
askamathematician.com

My Question.
Light is outside time, but if it enters a Bose Einstein Condensate, it slows down. How do we reconcile that the photon is both outside time, but slows down?

Their Answer.
There’s a post here that talks about that a bit.

http://www.askamathematician.com/2013/07/q-what-does-it-mean-for-light-to-be-stopped-or-stored/

Basically, when light exists, it’s traveling at c. When light “slows down”, then at least part of the time it’s not light. In the experiments where light is “stopped” it would be more accurate to say that it is “stored”. Very carefully prepared condensates (not just any old condensate) stops light kinda like a vinyl record stops sound (kinda). Hope that helps!
-Physicist

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Writings in Science, Sci-fi, First 5 Reviews

December 9, 2016

Writings in Science Synopsis and Reviews.

Synopsis Writings in Science, a History of the Future, is a vast sci-
fi novel written in stories, essays, poems, and plays. Here is the premise; during the last days of our planet, before he boards a rescue rocket, a man named “I” collects his favorite writings in science to remember Earth.
This is a large sci-fi book that covers a lot of science, with many amazing stories, characters, drama, and clever comedy. It does all this in a format of assorted stories, essays, poems and plays, that collectively tell a bigger story.

https://readersfavorite.com/book-review/writings-in-science

FIVE REVIEWS,

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement.. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job.

This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

The first thing I can say about this book by Tom Hendricks is wow.

It is hard to know where to start in sharing my thoughts on this book other than just how much I enjoyed it.

Writings in Science: A History of the Future can’t be read as a novel with a linear plot; no, it’s a compendium of beautiful writings depicting the future of humankind and the world human beings inhabit.

Tom Hendricks is a gifted writer, and there is no doubt that his stories, essays and drama are very provocative, especially for readers who love rethinking the future. I will surely be going back to read some of my favorite parts.

Writings in Science: A History of the Future by Tom Hendricks is a dazzling portrait of the world millions of years from now, as seen through the eyes of the character called “I.” It is the kind of sci-fi that can be characterized as visionary.

The author shows a lot of ingenuity in creating new cultures and governments, offering access to other planets, but it is what humankind does in the face of extreme adversity that will capture the hearts of readers.

It’s a work that will be adored by fans of sci-fi, short stories, futuristic essays and fantasy.

A History of the Future by Tom Hendricks is a beautiful collection of stories, dialogues, essays, and many things in between, depicting the world millions of years in the future.

Readers will enjoy the drama that features in the stories, the tight prose in the essays, and the compelling, somewhat symbolic characters. Tom Hendricks exhibits a very rich imagination in this entertaining work.

The author covers a variety of themes in a variety of styles, including ethical issues, scientific inventions, culture and politics.

The Setting is captivating. I was drawn in by the images the author conjured through the beautiful writing.

FULL REVIEWS

Reviewed By Ray Simmons for Readers’ Favorite

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement.. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job.

This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

Writings in Science (A History of the Future) by Tom Hendricks is billed as A Novel of Stories, Essays, Poems, and Plays. This is probably, at least structurally speaking, one of the most experimental novels I have read in a long time. Many sections read like the musings of an intelligent human being who thinks quite a lot about science, man, art, the universe, and the future. That man would be author Tom Hendricks. At around 400 pages, this is a lot of serious but sometimes whimsical musing. It is organized into “bottles” instead of chapters. (I told you it was experimental.) It is huge in scope, imagining a dying Earth millions of years in the future, and a protagonist running around collecting these literary tidbits as a history of Earth. This is quite a project, and this is quite a book. I liked it because it allowed my mind to ramble as I read Tom Hendricks’s viewpoint on many different topics, presented to me in different ways.

Writings in Science is, in many aspects, a stunning achievement. To tie all these topics and literary mediums into one book is no simple task, but Tom Hendricks does a great job. I enjoyed the essays more than I did the poems, plays, or stories. He hit on some topics that I have written on myself, and even came to a similar conclusion sometimes. The poems, jokes, and plays are good and, though I prefer straightforward prose in a novel for the most part, I found this a very interesting book.

Pi day, 3.14

March 15, 2016

Today is PI day, and I almost forgot. 3.14 …..

I had a slow time in the box office one day and was reading a book on the symbol PI. So I began memorizing it – got to about 80 places. With a little practice, it comes back.

I have to have it in rows like this to help me remember it.

3.14159 2653589 793238
462643 383279 50288
4 19 71 69399 37510
582 09
7494459230
781640628
6208998
62803482534211

Lit Math Puzzle

November 14, 2015

Thinking caps ON! LITERARY MATH:
1. Take the temperature at which books burn …
2. Divide it by that ‘Catch’ – number
3. Multiply by the sum of the digits in that ‘Big Brother’ year.
What number do you keep getting? Go!

Photo 1


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