Archive for the ‘Musea’ Category

Musea Quiz 10/17

October 24, 2017

The answer to, and winner (if any) for, our last contest question of:

I say Earthlings have landed on Mars. You say no.
When I tell you why I know that it is true, you will say … Yes Tom you are correct and I was wrong. Explain what is going on!

IS …
Bacteria are Earthlings just as much as you and me. Though NASA does everything it can to keep the outer space hardware sterile, I doubt they cover EVERY bacterial Earthling. So I say, recently, Earthlings have landed on Saturn – and in all likelihood when the spacecraft Cassini fell into Saturn 9/15/17, there were bacteria aboard and they went down with the ship!

I had no correct eligible answers. Seems you didn’t have a GERM of an idea on this one. I don’t dumb down so please wise up.

Now on to a new Q.: Win a copy of any of my 9 CDs, or copy of one of my artworks IF you are the first to …

E-MAIL ME AT THIS ADDRESS: tom-hendricks @ att.net(remove blanks of course) with the correct answer to the following art question .

DEDICATION: These contests are dedicated to my sister, Peggy, who answered more of the questions correctly than anyone else.

QUESTION;
What is this … ?

FINE PRINT: The CD prize is only available to those with mailing addresses in the US. Foreign winners will have to settle for the miniscule fame alone, and the satisfaction of a job well done. But don’t forget you can listen to all the music , read all my writings, and see all the art, whether you win or lose – and I’d be glad if you did!

Readers, IF you like these puzzles and would like to resend them to friends, post them on any newsgroup, or any website, please do so. The more the merrier!

For all things TH, (music, art, writing, Musea, etc) see
tomhendricks.us

Tom Hendricks
(editor of the 25 year old zine Musea)

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TeXas Video Showdown and KERA

October 24, 2017

Musea Readers know that I have my problems with both NPR and local stations KERA and KXT for their lack of support for artists.

So I was surprised, when googling my name to find this posted in April of 2015 on the KERA Art and Seek site.

I had sent them a story and link feeling that they would never do anything about it.

Take a look, and know that the TeXas Video Showdown, worst video ever made… on purpose, is still going strong with thousands of hits.

When you go to the link, note that there is a place to add comments. Please do if you would like to support the cause.

Now when I criticize their coverage I have to change, “never covered” to” that one time!”

http://artandseek.org/calendar/event/70571/texas-video-showdown

Biological Basis to Fear and Anger?

October 23, 2017

Finally, after studying the problem over many many years, I may have some discoveries about where Fear and Anger came from.

SUGGESTION, the two key emotions of FEAR and ANGER have a very specific biological basis.

Both emotions have evolved out of key parts of the digestive system in all living things. The two are tied to taking in nurturing while protecting against infection.

FEAR is the body’s response to any infection.
FEAR helps us BLOCK OUT and EXCRETE OUT infection.

ANGER is the body’s response to hunger.
ANGER helps us TAKE IN and HOLD IN nurturing.

We are AFRAID when we think there may be infection.
We are ANGRY when we are hungry.

FEAR seems to be most active around the mouth and nose before eating.

ANGER seems to be the most active in the small intestines when taking in nurturing.

SUGGESTION, most of these digestive emotions of fear and anger, happened in infancy when we were setting up our body’s digestive system and defense system. That was the time of the most danger. That was also the time of the most emotions of fear and anger.

SUGGESTION, because the digestive problems of infancy were unconscious developments, and because they were the most intense periods of infection fear and nurturing anger; they may lead us to unconscious adult problems of excess fear, or excess anger.

This leads to all the autoimmune diseases and negative behavior connected with this excess, repressed, infant, fear and anger.

There is much much more to this, and more implications than I can fathom right now.

Tom Hendricks – tomhendricks.us website.

Question about Rothko

October 12, 2017

Joe Underwood, asked me the following question about a Mark Rothko painting.

“Hi Tom. Can you explain to me how to appreciate these colored rectangles. I have some difficulty with some abstract art, but simple pieces like these give me the most trouble.

Joe, I’ll give it a try, and I thought I’d share what I say to others on my blog, because you are not the only one that feels this way.

First, you don’t have to like it, and that is very important. There are two parts to great art, one is the well seasoned opinions and commentary of many in the art field as to which artists stand out, and the other is whether you the viewer like them or not.

I appreciate great artists, but don’t LIKE most of them for one reason or another. And the ones I do love, often have paintings that I don’t care for, while other paintings of theirs, I just adore. I also often like bad paintings for one reason or another, and that’s fine too.

So not liking any artist or any painting is your personal choice. But I think it is also important to understand why many think a painter is worthy of appreciation whether you and I like or don’t like them And many do think Rothko is a very great painter.

So now we come to the other part. Whether you like him or not, the question is; why do others appreciate this artist and his work. What do they see in it that is worthy.

First I wrote this short essay for all people who have questions about any abstract art. https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/01/18/short-essay-on-abstract-art/

This will show you how painters can put a great amount of emotion and feeling into an abstract painting.

BTW, I paint both abstracts and realism, and abstracts are just as difficult or sometimes harder. For example, with great abstract works, every inch of the painting has to work together. You don’t have to do that with realism. I think abstract works are very difficult, and I think most so called abstract artists are not very good!

Now back to Mark Rothko. He is one of my favorites, and I think I can tell you why. I’ve even painted in that manner and will add an example later.

Google Mark Rothko. Now press the Images button up near the top. What you will see is a lot of his works. Take a look at the page and maybe the next and the next after.

There is a lot of color there. With some paintings the color works together to make a harmonious painting. Some the colors clash and make a more upsetting painting.
If I asked you to find the most cheerful painting on the page could you? What about the most dreary? I bet you could, because color and shape can do that.

Rothko didn’t start out with these blocks of color. That developed. His early work is not my favorite. It doesn’t really stand out from any of the other painters in that style. But I love much of this later work, like the piece that started this conversation.

First of all his paintings are big. And like many meditative things, they are simple, and for me and many others, profound, zen like, spiritual. The blocks and the field of color they seem to float in, could symbolize ying and yang, male and female, light and dark, yes and no, etc., but whatever you see, there is something more than just color to his best paintings .

Finally imagine this. You go to a chapel to meditate. Behind the altar is a large painting. It is big enough to envelope your eyes so that that is most all you see. You kneel and look up.

Which would lend itself to a more reflective experience, one of Rothko’s paintings with these huge nebulous blocks of floating color, or say a realistic portrait of a religious figure?

Take your favorite from these 3 pages of his works, and imagine that in your mind, full sized, behind the altar of the chapel. What do you think?

Hope this helps,
Tom

September Here …

October 7, 2017

September here is beautiful.
Heat is gone and winter’s at bay.
The leaves turn and twirl through the air.
Frost in the morning. There’s work to do.
Smoke from the chimneys. Children at play.


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