Posts Tagged ‘gut biome’

Prebiotics

June 8, 2017

Prebiotics may be a way to combat childhood obesity. It is a powder in a liquid that supports the growth of good bacteria in the gut.
More and more we are finding that the biome in the gut is a key element to all health. See more posts on this in this blog. Here is more from Science Daily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170607123949.htm

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First Infant Infection Good in Small Doses

February 22, 2015

FIRST INFECTION GOOD IN SMALL DOSES

This study suggests that the introduction of some bacteria into the infant gut, helps it set up its immune system. And without that early introduction – usually from mother’s breast milk – the child’s immune system does not set up well.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150221192213.htm

Quote:
The immune system is designed to be exposed to bacteria on a grand scale. If you minimize those exposures, the immune system won’t develop optimally.”

This supports my idea that there is gene transfer from the mother to the child, not in the genome, but in the bacteria DNA transferred from Mother to infant’s gut.

Gut Biome controlled by Host?

August 8, 2014

Lots of talk about our gut microbes (the foreign bugs that live on us have 10 times more DNA than our body). Mostly the talk is that the gut microbes call the shots, and we have to get the right ones to be healthy. But the host, us, are not without control. As I’ve said all along, and this study shows, it’s the other way around, and the gut biome is mostly controlled by the host, again us!

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140807145744.htm

This study looks at gut microbes in premature infants and finds lots of surprises – the same pattern of colonization seems to follow the age of the infant with 3 main bacteria. Further that antibiotics, etc don’t seem to matter that much

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/40738/title/Gut-s-Earliest-Bacterial-Colonizers/

Gene Transfer Through Mother’s Bacteria

May 26, 2014

Seems to me that we have a new way to transfer genes that is outside the genome. Support for the idea is growing stronger.
Transfer bacteria from mother to child (transfer her bacterial genes to child’s gut)

Here is another study and a quote from it
http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/40038/title/The-Maternal-Microbiome/

Quote: While many questions remain, it’s pretty much taken for granted that the microbial communities of the placenta, vagina, and breast milk are important for fetal and infant development.

Problems With The Newborn’s Gut Biome

May 3, 2014

When the Gut Biome is Not Yet Set up in the newborn child – What’s the importance of allowing a gut biome to fully set up in the newborn.

The newborn needs both vaginal birth and breast milk to transfer all the mother’s good gut bacteria into the infant.

Then the child needs time to allow that gut bacteria to settle and multiply.
(Note the infants infection fighting process is not yet active in the first 6 months and most immunity comes from the mother. Most likely this is to allow the good gut bacteria to take hold without the child’s defense system attacking it.

But if the child doesn’t have vaginal birth, or doesn’t have breast milk and has formula instead, or doesn’t receive breast milk long enough; he does not have the necessary gut biome to

1. help to excrete out waste (anal trauma)
2. help to digest first foods. (oral trauma)

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Study supports this:

This study suggests that the introduction of some bacteria into the infant gut, helps it set up its immune system. And without that early introduction – usually from mother’s breast milk – the child’s immune system does not set up well.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150221192213.htm

Quote:
The immune system is designed to be exposed to bacteria on a grand scale. If you minimize those exposures, the immune system won’t develop optimally.”


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