What is Postism Art

What is the Post-ism Art Movement?

Postism, is art for a new century, not a continuation of last century trends.

Here are some main points.

1 Mass Market Paintings like Prints. When any art form is mass marketed it enters a golden age. This has happened with books, records, and film. Let’s add paintings. Most art is in museum basements. Mass Marketing allows art to tour in copies and allows artists to make royalties on copies.

2. End a Century of Isms. Dump the genres and formulas and let all kinds of art be a part of the art world.

3. Shift Emphasis From Trendy to Quality. Shift emphasis from the latest trendy art, to quality art of any kind. Just because art is weird does not mean it is great art.

4. Free the Art From Museums and Galleries. Get the art out of the ivory elitist museum and gallery towers and back into the world. Make art that is relevant and communicates with people.

5. Postism is Part of a Bigger Revolution. Postism is part of the bigger art and media revolution that includes art, music, lit, film, media, and a lot more.

Revolution in Arts (Visual)
http://tinyurl.com/38a5txu

Poem/video/sayings page
http://wp.me/s5S9X-1833

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5 Responses to “What is Postism Art”

  1. poetsunionus Says:

    Reblogged this on poetsunionus and commented:
    Ye gotz a good angle iron hence handle on this here…. me own concept “logotype”, namely:”‘AMODERNISM'”– which appears on the orginalPOETSUNION.us “seal”, circa2004– is I gut- feelis parallel perhaps kindred to yr. most excellent “post-ism”

  2. musea Says:

    JHC, my online friend, sent me some smart comments on these art ideas, and I asked if I could share them. He said, Tom: Go ahead as long as you state that this is just one person’s opinion, not an authoritative art historian’s or art dealer’s.

    TOM
    Here are some main points.
    1 Mass Market Paintings like Prints. When any art form is mass marketed it enters a golden age. This has happened with books, records, and film. Let’s add paintings. Most art is in museum basements. Mass Marketing allows art to tour in copies and allows artists to make royalties on copies.

    JHC
    Apparently one can now computer print in media that resembles oil paint and can be built up thick layers, etc. I don’t know if the traditional translucent effects are possible since the chemistry is probably quite different, but it sounds as if artists now have a new tool by which to make multiples instead of the traditional methods such as engravings, etchings, etc.

    I used to know some artists in Houston who did etching and my current boss’s son does it now in San Diego. However, there are limited numbers of copies made because the plate wears, so low serial numbers are preferred by buyers. (I remember once I got a small piece for a girl friend and her dog ate it. I couldn’t replace it because the edition was limited and the plate had already been destroyed.) There are cases where worn plates are touched up and 2nd editions are printed, but these are never as valuable as the first printings.

    As for using this new printing technology to make copies of Old Masters, I have certain misgivings involving the sense of authenticity and uniqueness. While some people do collect multiples, I think seeing a unique creation by an artist produces a very different feeling than looking at a reproduction. I realize this is somewhat metaphysical, but I think it is nonetheless real. Reproductions are great for dorm rooms and teaching aids, but the emotional effect is not the same as viewing the original, unique creation by a single person.

    TOM
    I don’t at all. As an artist, my copies are just as fine as the originals. Sometimes better. The originals don’t hold anything that doesn’t come across in copies. I understand what a special book might hold, but the words are the same, the message is the same. If I can’t read the original Shakespeare folio, I can still read Shakespeare.

    Remember original paintings can’t travel well – insurance is high for example, and many don’t want to send their paintings on the road , can’t be seen by any but a few elites for the most part, and most of the world’s great paintings are stored in basements in museums, where no one ever sees them. Then too they are fragile, should not travel, and need copies to preserve what is there before it fades.

    Here is the choice, painting copies to be seen by all in every corner of the world, or a few elites in major towns, seeing a small percentage for a perceived benefit of being the original when artists like me don’t think that matters (Would you turn down a Rembrandt print, or Picasso etching, just because they didn’t touch it?
    Neither would I.)

    JHC
    Obviously this does not apply to works conceived as multiples, in part because each one is slightly different due to differences in inking, plate wear, etc. Mostly though, I think it’s knowing the artist’s intention, whether to produce a unique creation or a multiple series.

    So, I have no problem with multiples–I wish I had had the money and known about Maurits Escher, for example, earlier when his work was still affordable and available. I have seen many reproductions, but somehow they seem less authentic than ones from his own hand that I’ve seen only once years ago in San Francisco at a private gallery.

    I have no problems with art shows of multiples– I’ve actually seen a few. Most communities have art museums or private galleries, so I don’t think touring shows need to be in modified buses, if I understand your idea correctly.

    There used to be a shlock artist who would paint very sentimental pictures, make prints, coat them with some textured plastic goop to make them look sort of like original oils and then paint over them in certain places to make
    each one a little different. I saw one of his galleries years ago in a very touristy part of San Diego, but I have no idea if he is still doing this or what his name was.

    I’ll have to think about Golden Ages and multiple copies of anything but books–somehow popular music, which is available on CD, DVD, vinyl, and the internet, doesn’t strike me as being in a Golden Age. I do listen to recorded music, especially on my computer, but I prefer going to concerts of serious contemporary and classical music. This is easier for me as I live in a large urban area with several universities.

    Live contemporary popular music apparently is less complex and may be musically inferior to recorded music by the same musicians playing the same pieces, yet audiences love it–probably in part because of the shared experience with other fans.

    TOM
    2. End a Century of Isms. Dump the genres and formulas and let all
    kinds of art be a part of the art world.

    JHC
    I haven’t been reading the art journals recently, but AFAIK, there is no contemporary movement like Impressionism to which many artists give their allegiance. Last night I went to an art show and passed a couple of contemporary galleries on foot and was unimpressed by what I saw. No style was predominant. The show had some interesting 3D works that would be difficult to reproduce in multiples except in factory. Some university students won prizes, but each piece was unique stylistically. Apparently anything goes, which I consider healthy.

    TOM
    Take the artists you saw. Did any of them go beyond one style? Did one for example do landscapes, portraits, still lifes, and abstracts, etc? No? then they were locked into a single ism a single way they could make their art.
    Postism is about the artist doing more than one style. That brings breadth and scope to art.

    (TOM)
    3. Shift Emphasis From Trendy to Quality. Shift emphasis from the
    latest trendy art, to quality art of any kind. Just because art is
    weird does not mean it is great art.

    JHC
    Amen, though nothing I saw last night was particularly weird or even sexual.

    TOM
    4. Free the Art From Museums and Galleries. Get the art out of the
    ivory elitist museum and gallery towers and back into the world. Make
    art that is relevant and communicates with people.

    JHC
    San Diego is full of small private galleries, commercial galleries, school exhibits and museums which show local people. I don’t see much ivory towerism here. Alas my friend Jonathan Glasier had to close his new gallery (Kalimba Gallery) because of zoning laws even though he and his artist wife owned the building. We did have two multimedia shows–art and music there before the county government closed him down. Hopefully he will reopen
    elsewhere next year.

    TOM
    Yes and all those artists in SD are starving except for one or two darlings of the art world. Mass marketing would open it up to all. Just look at what happened in history after records came out, or film videos, or books, or TV, or the internet.

    (TOM)
    5. Postism is Part of a Bigger Revolution. Postism is part of the
    bigger art and media revolution that includes art, music, lit, film,
    media, and a lot more.

    JHC
    My late friend Ivor Darreg (whose mother studied art in France with Rodin), once came up with a new art movement he called “Praetertemporalism,” but it was never exactly clear to me what he meant. It certainly involved the rejection of atonal and overly dissonant music and I suspect non-objective art (dog vomit on toast, as one critic said of one artist’s paintings).
    Anyway, though I’m not clear what Postism is, I found your post thought-provoking.

    TOM
    Thanks , and I think you got it mostly.
    I also did a series of videos about all this (as well as hundreds of blog posts etc. Just go to blog and push art)

    Later comments:

    JHC
    I still think authenticity is emotionally meaningful. I feel differently seeing a unique piece of art created by a single person for in most cases a single client than viewing even a good and faithful reproduction. I feel the same about seeing a real fossil skeleton in a paleontology museum rather than viewing a “plasterosaurus,” a fake skeleton composed of casts even it superficially looks the same.
    Likewise holding a real clay tablet or an Assyrian cylinder seal in my hand means more than looking at a transcription or a plaster cast of the inscription. Perhaps this is because I have studied history or simply am of an older generation.

    I would be curious to learn what other, particularly younger, people think about this subject.

    BTW, in every art museum I’ve visited, the important paintings were hung in prominent positions and well-lighted, never in dark basements as you imply.

    Normally in an art show, only recent examples of an artist’s work is exhibited unless it is a retrospective. All of the pieces in the last show I attended were contemporary pieces in the artists’ current styles.
    I wouldn’t expect anything different in this kind of show. IIRC, I’ve seen only 1 retrospective in the past few years.

    As I said, multiples are a different case.

    TOM
    Thanks for your comments.

  3. musea Says:

    Then too if someone devises a way to charge a penny per view on a webpage, that would allow any great artist to get money for their art and have a career without any middlemen.

  4. musea Says:

    When it comes to the art media, they seem to promote weird over quality. Maybe it’s because weird is easier to understand.

    Architecture: cold, harsh rigid, not comforting, not charming, not colorful, not fun, antiseptic and unfeminine.
    Time for female architects.

  5. musea Says:

    Modern art has become a trendy clique. But art is too important to be reduced to that.

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