Archive for June, 2015

“Portraits” – Novel Review by Jamie Michele

June 30, 2015

Jamie Michele : 4 Stars – out of 5

Title: Portraits
Subtitle: A Novel About Art, Artists, and the Art Revolution
Author: Tom Hendricks
Genre: Fiction – General

Portraits1Col


Yes, at the heart of Portraits is a love story, a love triangle, but its soul delves deeper into a layered plot that draws out a more widespread implication: that art is the axis of all things beautiful, significant, and real.

Reviewed by Jamie Michele for Readers’ Favorite
Portraits by Tom Hendricks is the story of a co-op art group, forged out of their mutual distaste for the corporatization of the Dallas art scene. It follows three main characters, Jack Labas, Francesca (aka: Mary Wollencroft), and Missy U. The co-op itself involves artists comprised of its nine artists: Jim Dias, its leader, Harvey Carter, a landscape artist, Linda Jenson, Jim’s girlfriend, Raymond Kirk, a Rothco disciple, Wendy Phillips, a still art painter, Sarah Williams, another landscaper artist, Karen Griffin, a painter of large-scale portraits, Jack, a figure painter and the main protagonist, and Francesca, a clothing designer who replaced Marty Kao, a street scene painter who leaves the co-op. Missy U is a fan of Jack’s work and his ever-present pen pal, who turns out to be far more committed to his art and ultimately a saving grace to the group as a whole. The group grows and their popularity among the public expands beyond their greatest hopes, while Jack finds love with Francesca and encouragement from the shadowy Missy U. While Portraits by Tom Hendricks does a great job of following the plight of an artist and its extension into every aspect of an artist’s life, namely in love within this story, where it really shines is in its portrayal of the community as a whole. A reader gets a strong sense of the impact of art and its influence across other media and genres of life that unfurl before you, displaying its far reaching promise and the potential to impact even the most remote corners of a community. Yes, at the heart of Portraits is a love story, a love triangle, but its soul delves deeper into a layered plot that draws out a more widespread implication: that art is the axis of all things beautiful, significant, and real. With some polish and a round of things beautiful, significant, and real. With some polish and a round of good editing, the bones of Portraits by Tom Hendricks has great potential.
As of the time of this review, the spelling and grammatical mistakes let it down, although do not detract from its manifesto as a whole. Highly
recommended.

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3 kid’s poems: Bystanders or The Ballad of Toby Dan, Ogres and Trolls, The Little Boat

June 30, 2015

BYSTANDERS or the BALLAD OF TOBY DAN

Poor Toby Dan
he kicked a can
and it kicked back

poor Toby Grundy
“What’s so funny?”

poor Toby Daph
just had to laugh

poor Toby Don
“What’s going on?”

poor Toby Dalling
heard his mother calling

poor Toby Down
just looked around

poor Toby Spin
scratched his shin

poor Toby Limbo
stood arms akimbo

poor Toby Round
jumped up and down

poor Toby June
jumped o’er the Moon

poor Toby Pies
darted his eyes

poor Toby Tish
ran off with a dish

poor Toby Proud
managed the crowd

poor Toby Bubble
looked o’re his shoulder

poor Toby Riot
just kept quiet.

OGRES AND TROLLS

Ogres and Trolls
Ogres and Trolls
the meadow is empty
but the forest is full

Ogres and Trolls
Ogres and Trolls
the day is empty
but the night is full

THE LITTLE BOAT

the little boat
tugs at it’s rope
anxious to sail
the open sea

Tom Hendricks Author Page on Amazon

June 27, 2015

Musea Readers,

Welcome to my Author page on Amazon Books. It has all four books, my blog posts, some photos, bio information, and more.

See what you think.  Let me know.

http://tinyurl.com/o58t7mv

Mystery:3

Cendrillon (Children’s Novel) Review by Melinda Hills

June 25, 2015

Here’s a 2nd 5 out of 5 Star review for my kid’s book, CENDRILLON. This one by Melinda Hills

My children’s novel CENDRILLON, the True Story of Cinderella, has gotten some favorite reviews – 2 with 5 of 5 stars. This is the 2nd one. Cendrillon is available on all main streamingbook sites for $1.99streamingbook sites for $1.99.

Cendrillon*:Keep:Cover

The True Story of Cinderella engages the reader with just enough differences to the traditional version to make it quite enjoyable.

Reviewed by Melinda Hills for Readers’ Favorite
Beginning with the discovery of old letters in a secret compartment in an  ornate chest, Cendrillon: The True Story of Cinderella by Tom Hendricks  relates a new version of the beloved fairy tale. Written by Queen  Cendrillon to her son, Prince William, the letters describe the life  Cendrillon knew as the daughter of a hard working woodcutter who  remarried after the death of his wife. The stepmother, Rachel, and her  two spoiled daughters, Phillis and Marsha, resented Cendrillon and reduced her to the position of servant after the death of her father.  Unable to attend the ball because of the demands of the others,  Cendrillon wished she could have gone and up popped a fairy godmother!  Of course, the Prince was not at all interested in any of the young ladies  until Cendrillon arrived and, as they say, the rest was history. A lost  slipper, a country-wide search, and a happy ending lead to the arrival of a  new, young Prince.

Tom Hendricks uses a unique historical perspective to bring new life to the  tale of Cinderella. Cendrillon: The True Story of Cinderella engages the  reader with just enough differences to the traditional version to make it  quite enjoyable. Alternative explanations for events add to the interest,  and taking the story past the wedding contributes even more to the  historical flavor. Hidden within the story are lessons about love, loss and  acceptable behavior, not to mention the definition of true beauty.  Intended for children but refreshing for older readers as well, Cendrillon:

The True Story of Cinderella is a delightful version of a favorite fairy tale.

——————
Title: Cendrillon
Subtitle: The True Story of Cinderella
Author: Tom Hendricks
Genre:
Children – General
——————–
Appearance – 5:
Plot – 5
Development- 5
Formatting – 5:
Marketability – 4:
Overall – 5

Cendrillon (children’s novel) Review by Jack Magnus

June 23, 2015

Dear Musea Readers,  My children’s novel CENDRILLON, the True Story of Cinderella, has gotten some favorite reviews. Here is one by Jack Magnus.  He gave it 5 of 5 stars. Thanks Jack Magnus. Cendrillon is available on all main streamingbook sites for $1.99streamingbook sites for $1.99.

Cendrillon*:Keep:Cover

Reviewed by Jack Magnus for Readers’ Favorite.
Title: Cendrillon Subtitle: The True Story of Cinderella
Author: Tom Hendricks
Genre: Children – General … Cendrillon:

True Story of Cinderella, is a marvelous retelling of the classic fairy tale. It’s simply and elegantly related by the anonymous narrator, and I found myself enchanted by his story.

The True Story of Cinderella is a novella for children and preteens written by Tom Hendricks. The narrator of the story, who remains anonymous, had an ornate chest that just happened to have an undiscovered secret drawer. One day, his housekeeper tripped over some shoes in the attic, and her fall caused the drawer to open. In it were a packet of old letters tied with a ribbon. He brought the packet to the curator he bought the chest from, who opened it and found letters written in German, and bearing the royal seal and a black and white etching of a young girl. When the letters were translated, they were found to be from Queen Cendrillon to her son, Prince William. They bore a startling resemblance to the fairy tale about Cinderella.

Tom Hendricks’ preteen and children’s novella, Cendrillon: The True Story of Cinderella, is a marvelous retelling of the classic fairy tale. It’s simply and elegantly related by the anonymous narrator, and I found myself enchanted by his story. It doesn’t matter that we’ve all read or heard the story of Cinderella many times before. This version, which includes a carefully restored photograph of the heroine of the tale, makes the story an adventure and a delight all over again. The wicked stepmother, Rachael, and her daughters are suitably awful, and the circumstances surrounding their meeting with the prince are priceless and comedic. And Cendrillon? She’s everything a fairy tale lover could ask for. While this novella is geared for a preteen and child audience, anyone who still remembers the thrills and chills of the fairy tales of their childhood will remembers the thrills and chills of the fairy tales of their childhood will love it as well. Cendrillon: The True Story of Cinderella is most highly recommended.

Appearance – 5
Plot – 5
Formatting – 4
Overall – 5