Hendricks Health Theory

READERS PLEASE NOTE:  This hypothesis is going through many changes. Some of these ideas have been altered or amended. The later posts added at the end are more up to date, and should be more accurate. I always welcome your comments, questions, etc. Tom Hendricks , January 2011.

The Hypothesis summary:  The biological basis of life is also the major factor of all human behavior. it’s based on two very basic and universal things; food in, and waste out. Food in and waste out, evolved to all kinds of nurturing in, and all kinds of waste out. To discover why we behave as we do, look at human behavior in terms of moving toward food/nurturing, and moving away from waste.  – Jan 2014

For another summary of the Origin of Life – a different perspective (3.14), see
https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/03/10/the-origin-of-life-a-different-perspective/

The INTRO TO ISSUE:

Dear Reader, Some of you know I have a great interest in biology. This post is about some recent ideas that I have had that I think may be new and important. Here goes.

Let’s start with metabolism. That’s all the chemical processes in all living things.

Metabolism is divided into two categories. They are  CATABOLISM,  and ANABOLISM. CATABOLISM breaks down molecules to supply energy, etc. It’s a destructive metabolism. ANABOLISM uses energy to build complex molecules out of simpler ones – constructive metabolism. They are opposite, but work together in all living things.

This issues suggests these three major points:

1. Just about every aspect of life has evolved from catabolic or anabolic biochemistry (Catabolic breaks down molecules, and anabolic synthesizes bigger molecules from them). And everything means EVERYTHING. Catabolism and anabolism aren’t the gorilla in the room. They are the gorilla in the gorilla!

2. The two pathways are relatively separate after four billion years of evolution for many reasons . Regulating each separately gives many evolutionary advantages; more flexibility, the ability to evolve quickly, more control etc. Also mixing the two may be dangerous to the cell, or cells. See part one.

3. Because they are separate but connected,  I suggest there is a ‘symbiotic arms race’ between the two. Whenever a positive change happens on one side, it may spur the other to match it. Thus there is a sort of evolutionary motor directing evolution towards better catabolism, or anabolism.

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Part One: SPECIFIC FIRST EXAMPLES

This section suggests that a major aspect of all life is the emphasis on either catabolic or anabolic biochemistry. It gives examples that support these two specific ideas:

1. Anabolic and Catabolic  processes have not blended over 4 billion years, but stayed separate. For example, catabolic processes such as strong digestive acids would cause real harm if they were blended with anabolic processes.

2. Catabolic processes seem to have evolved to include not only breaking down molecules, but  DIGESTION, the IMMUNE SYSTEM, and EXCRETING WASTE OUT. Many times these three pathways are related in some way.

Catabolic Specifics:

1. The GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT. This tract in animals goes from the mouth to the anus and is for  digestion. Note how separate it is from the rest of the body. Excluding the absorption aspect, it is almost completely separate from the rest of the body. Note all the bodies defenses here that protect from antigens. They not only include stomach acids, but the process of spitting out bad food, and excreting out wastes.  NOTE: The alimentary tract is separate from anabolic processes (excluding  the mostly isolated aspects of absorption).  It involves digestion, protection, and waste out

2. LYSOSOMES.  These organelles in animal cells not only digest food, but also excess or worn out organelles, food particles, engulfed viruses / bacteria, and – at the end of the cell’s life – they can destroy the entire cell. There is real danger from these lysosomes, if their membranes break (Tay-Sachs disease, for example). NOTE: These organelles have to be separate from anabolic processes. They involve digestion, protection, and / or waste out.

3. VACUOLES. These are vesicles in the center of fungi, plants; and, some protists, animal, and bacterial, cells. Vacuoles are enclosed in a membrane and separate. Vacuoles isolate what’s harmful, store waste, export waste, and in plants carry the poisonous compounds used for protection. NOTE: These organelles have to be separate from anabolic processes. They involve digestion, protection, and waste out.

4. PHAGOCYTOSIS . The cellular process in protists that engulfs particles in phagocytes  and digests them. Note by surrounding the foreign particles it keeps them separate from the rest of the cell. Phagocytosis helps remove waste and ingest pathogens as part of the immune system. NOTE This cellular process is very separate from the rest of the cell. It involves digestion, protection, and waste out.

5. BACTERIA  DIGESTION . Some bacteria and fungi digest by excreting enzymes that breakdown the food outside the cell. Also bacteria excrete toxins that help in protection. NOTE. The digestive system is outside of the cell and separate from it. It involves digestion, protection, and keeping waste out.

6. IMMUNE SYSTEM. The lymphatic system is separate from the circulatory system.  It protects the body, and removes waste. White blood cells are separate from red blood cells.  NOTE The lymphatic system is separate from the rest of the body. It involves protection and waste out.

7. CELLULAR RESPIRATION.  Mitochondria are organelles that are found in most eukaryotic cells. They are the cell’s powerhouse. They act like a digestive system, take in nutrients, and break them down for energy for the cell. NOTE Mitochondria are separate from the rest of the cell. They even have their own DNA. They involve digestion.

8. PHOTOSYNTHESIS.  Catabolic light reaction is separate from the anabolic dark reaction. NOTE the two parts of photosynthesis are separate and different. The light reaction is dependent on sunlight.

9. CELL DIVISION IN EUKARYOTES. The interphase build up of two identical parts, is followed by a separate mitotic phase, that involves both mitosis , and cytokinesis which tears apart the inside and outside of the cell. The mitotic phase is separate from the interphase. It involves tearing apart, instead of building up.

SUM UP: This shows how anabolic and catabolic processes have evolved along separate pathways over four billion years; and that there is little blending of pathways between the two.  And it shows that catabolic processes often overlap between breaking down molecules, digestion, the immune system, and excreting out waste.

How difficult is it to imagine that, in response to environmental pressures, an organism  could evolve catabolic processes over anabolic processes, or vice versa as needed to better fit the environment. If natural selection chose more catabolic aspects (digestion, protection, waste out) as the best response to the environment, then that would be stressed in the species. If natural selection chose more anabolic aspects as the best response to the environment, that would be stressed in the species.

Clearly we should expect to find major divisions of catabolic and anabolic processes in life. We should be able to find many novel ways where species have amplified the best aspects of catabolic processes, in some species; while others amplified the best aspects of anabolic processes. It may be the major difference between species.

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Part Two : MAJOR DIVISIONS

Start with the basic concept of catabolic and anabolic biochemistry. I suggest that these two chemical pathways evolved to many novel forms and developments. And that in all these major divisions, one half is more catabolic in its evolved forms, while the other half is more anabolic in its evolved forms. Here is my list so far. Remember this list is a work in progress. Expect changes, additions, and possible deletions as we learn more.

SOME OF THE POSSIBLE WAYS CATABOLIC / ANABOLIC HAVE EVOLVED:

Species level / Sex:

CATABOLIC : Male / ANABOLIC: Female

All LIfe Level / ATP

CATABOLIC: Generates ATP / ANABOLIC: Consumes ATP

Glucose

CATABOLIC – Breaks Down Glucose to make ATP / ANABOLIC –  Synthesizes Glucose

Hormones – two main types

CATABOLIC Hormones – hormones that manage catabolic reactions

ANABOLIC Hormones – hormones that manage anabolic reactions

All Life Level / Entropy

CATABOLIC: Increase of cellular entropy. / ANABOLIC: Decrease of cellular entropy.

All Life Level / Survival Strategies

CATABOLIC :  Fight/Flight, (competition, conflict, survival of the fittest.)

ANABOLIC:  Symbiosis, (Tend and Befriend, rest and digest)

Energy Source

CATABOLIC – heterotrophs (animals etc.) / ANABOLIC – autotrophs (plants etc.)

Photosynthesis

CATABOLIC – light reaction / ANABOLIC – dark reaction.

Relation to other Organisms

CATABOLIC – antibiosis  / ANABOLIC – symbiosis

General

CATABOLIC – anything that protects and defends / ANABOLIC – anything that nurtures

Daily Metabolism Cycle

CATABOLIC : mostly in wake period of daily metabolism cycle.

ANABOLIC: mostly in sleep period of daily metabolism cycle.

Cell Division/ Replication

CATABOLIC: Cell division – cells divide into single separate organisms

ANABOLIC:   Cell division – cells connect up into a multi cell organism.

Growth and Weight Problems

Growth / Overweight – ANABOLIC rate high and / or CATABOLIC rate low.

Loss / Underweight – ANABOLIC rate low and / or CATABOLIC rate high.

Two Part Human Mind

CATABOLIC Mind – mostly conscious mind, wake mind.

ANABOLIC Mind – mostly subconscious mind, sleep mind.

Autonomic Nervous system

CATABOLIC – Sympathetic Nervous System, (fight and flight)

ANABOLIC – Parasympathetic Nervous System, ( rest and digest)

Emotional Evolution

CATABOLIC –  Anger, Fear  / ANABOLIC – Neediness,  Hunger

Division of Processes in the Body

CATABOLIC – Attacks non-self  / ANABOLIC – Supports self

Three Types of Psychological Behavior  of Karen Horney  from “Inner Conflicts”.

CATABOLIC –  Moves against others, Moves away from others  or moves against self.

ANABOLIC – Moves towards others.  (Fourth type Moves toward self).

Digestion and Assimilation

CATABOLIC – Digestion  Gastrointestinal Tract

ANABOLIC – Absorption and Assimilation.

Circulatory System

CATABOLIC –  Lymphatic System , White Blood Cell

ANABOLIC – Circulatory System,  Red Blood Cell

All Life Level – Food In, Waste out

CATABOLIC – Waste out – Blocked out or excreted out

ANABOLIC: – Food in  – Taken in or held in.

Cell Level

CATABOLIC – Lysosomes, Vacuoles, Phagocytes. / ANABOLIC – Rest of the cell.

Cell Cycle in Eukaryotes

CATABOLIC – Mitotic phase (mitosis and cytokinesis)

ANABOLIC – interphase

Cell

CATABOLIC – Cell death

ANABOLIC – Cell replication

Origin Of LIfe, Clue

CATABOLIC/ ANABOLIC division is an adaptation to the Day / Night or LIght / Dark Cycle. If life is a two part catabolic / anabolic biochemical system, then clearly it’s a cyclical system that has evolved as adaptation to something in the environment that is also a two part cycle. The only environmental two part cycle with enough force to fit and enough constancy to last over a long period of time, would be the Day/Sun/Heat then Night/No-Sun/Cool daily cycle. Thus life has to be a biochemical system that has evolved to fit, mimic, mirror, exist within, and adapt to, the daily sun cycle. That suggests that we must investigate the biochemistry of life in reference to both a day/sun/heat chemistry and a night/ no-sun/cooler chemistry. And that the origin of life was an event such that it was daily affected by the sun cycle. It is likely that anabolic build up was the first of the two to develop. Then catabolic breakdown evolved later. Note there is most likely also a wet/dry cycle in the origin of life, too.

Origin of Life Clue – Chemical processes in both Light and Dark phase

CATABOLIC – Night, No sunlight – UV, wet,  hydrolysis of ATP, type chemistry.

ANABOLIC – Day, sunlight-UV, dry  condensation synthesis, type processes.

CATABOLIC –  Hydrolysis

ANABOLIC – Condensation Reactions.

TYPE OF SELECTION PRESSURE  NOW. All the major metabolic pathways seen in prokaryotes probably evolved in first billion years. The catabolic processes seem to be highly conserved such that stabilizing selection predominates.

CATABOLIC – Stabilizing Selection

ANABOLIC –  Directional and Diversifying selection.

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Here is a list of some other possible evolved aspects of the catabolic anabolic division that may be worth considering. Key: C – Catabolic , A – Anabolic.

BREATHING – C. Breathing out, A. Breathing in. Child – C. Birth, A. – Prenatal development. TWO HEMISPHERES OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX – C. Right Hemisphere, A. Left Hemisphere.  FOUR OPTIONS OF FOOD IN / WASTE OUT – C. 2, 4  A. 1,3. THINKING PROCESS – C. Break a problem down to its parts. A. Build up parts to a new idea.

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Part Three: WHAT THIS MAY MEAN

IF all life evolved in one of two ways – either better catabolism or better anabolism, then that may begin to explain these things:

How life has evolved  in only two specific separate pathways, anabolic and catabolic.

Why we have two sexes

Why males are the more aggressive sex. Why protective male behavior.

Why violent behavior is mostly a male behavior.

Why females are the  more nurturing sex. Why nurturing female behavior.

Why males react to stress with fight or flight

Why females react to stress with tend and defend

That there is a daily metabolism cycle.

That the daily metabolism cycle has two parts – wake and sleep.

That wake is more concerned with catabolic processes

That sleep is more concerned with anabolic processes

That there may be two relatively separate  minds in humans, not one. A catabolic mind, and an anabolic mind.

That the wake mind may be the catabolic mind (conscious mind?)

That the sleep mind may be the anabolic mind. (unconscious mind?)

That in sleep the NREM or deep sleep (80%) is for replenishing the body (anabolic).

That in sleep the REM or dream sleep (20%) is for preparing waste out (catabolic).

That growth  has an anabolic rate that is high, and a catabolic rate that is low.

That loss  (opposite of growth) has an anabolic rate that is low, and a catabolic rate that is high.

That overweight is a catabolic rate that is too low, and/or an anabolic rate too high.

That underweight is a catabolic rate that is too high, and/or an anabolic rate too low.

That the only true way  to adjust weight (loosing or gaining) is to adjust the catabolic / anabolic rates.

Why women are more prone to weight problems then men.

Why loosing or gaining weight is so difficult to do.

That looking at catabolic rates versus anabolic rates can now be a diagnostic tool for Doctors.

That too high a catabolic rate, and too low an anabolic rate has certain specific health and psychological problems.

That these problems can be resolved by adjusting the catabolic / anabolic rates.

That too low a catabolic rate, and too high an anabolic rate has certain specific health and psychological problems.

That these problems can be resolved by adjusting the catabolic / anabolic rates.

That the Sympathetic Nervous system (fight and flight) evolved out of Catabolic processes.

That the Parasympathetic Nervous System (rest and digest) evolved out of the Anabolic processes.

That there are two basic types of hormones: Catabolic, and Anabolic hormones.

That Anger  and Fear are the main two catabolic emotions. (Fight or flight).

That Hunger and Neediness are the main anabolic emotions. (Tend or befriend).

That the three major inner conflicts outlined by Karen Horney in “Inner Conflicts” are reflections of anabolic or catabolic behavior with anabolic being “Move towards others” behavior, and catabolic being “Move against others’ behavior, AND “Move away from others’ behavior.

That her groundbreaking book missed the fourth. “Move towards self” (anabolic).

That food in waste out is a reflection of  anabolism (food in) and catabolism (waste out)

That the Four Options are half anabolism (take in what nurtures, hold in what nurtures ) and half catabolism (block out what does not nurture, excrete out what does not nurture.)

That the origin of the two chemistries of catabolism and anabolism must be an adaptation to some dual cycle in the environment.

That the only such cycle in the environment is the light and dark, day and night cycle.

That the origin of catabolism and anabolism must be an adaptation to the light dark sun cycle.

That a possible scenario for the origin is  a day night, light dark, cycle such that:

anabolic is Day, sunlight-UV, dry  condensation synthesis type processes. And

catabolic is  Night, No sunlight – UV, hydrolysis of ATP type chemistry.

That there may be some direction in natural selection.

That natural selection seems to always goes in one of two ways; either better catabolism or better anabolism.

That there may be a purpose to life – better anabolism and or better catabolism.

That anabolism and catabolism are kept relatively separate for  the four billion years That life has existed, in order that each division can better regulate that side, and have more ability to evolve, and change, and adapt to the environment.

That anabolism and catabolism are under a type of ‘symbiotic arms race’ where the separate sides help spur each other to further development and improvement through natural selection.

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Part Four: LETTER ON A NEW SCIENCE PAPER ON THE ‘ZINC WORLD’.

I was  very pleased to receive this letter, and to be a tiny part of this science paper:

Dear Tom, several years ago you have sent me a letter with suggestion to pursue further the topic of the light-driven origin of life.  Although it took some time to find physically plausible solutions for several problems related to the light-driven abiogenesis, it has found to be possible to produce a realistic scenario and even to prove it.  The results are described in the two papers that are freely accessible  from the home page of Biology Direct (www.biology-direct.com).

Thank you once more for your encouragement (and check the Acknowledgements

section of the first paper!) With best regards Armen

Armen Y. Mulkidjanian, Ph.D. University of  Osnabrueck, School of Physics and School of Biology/Chemistry Barbarastrasse 7 D-49076, Osnabrueck, Germany

ADD ONS SINCE ISSUE PUBLISHED: Notes and updates on the hypothesis.

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Support Doc 1 Separate

This supports these ideas

1. Catabolic and anabolic pathways are separate.

2. Catabolic and anabolic pathways are never at equilibrium.  Therefore they can evolve separately.

3. Change on either catabolic or anabolic pathways  may put selection pressure on the other pathway to better match and work together.

1 Catabolic and anabolic pathways are separate.

“”Catabolic and anabolic pathways differ. If a metabolite is converted to another metabolite by an exergonic process, free energy must be supplied to convert the second metabolite back to the first. This energetically “uphill” process requires a different pathway for at least some of the reaction steps.

The existence of independent interconversion routes … is an important property of metabolic pathways because it allows independent control of the two processes. If metabolite 2 is required by the cell, it is necessary to ‘turn off’ the pathway from 2 to 1 while ‘turning on’ the pathway from 1 to 2. Such independent control would be impossible without different pathways.”

2. Catabolic and anabolic pathways are never at equilibrium. Therefore they can evolve separately.

“Living organisms, which take up nutrients, release waste products, and generate work and heat, are open systems and therefore can never be at equilibrium. They continuously ingest high-enthalpy, low-entropy nutrients, which they convert to low – enthalpy, high – entropy waste products. The free energy released in this process powers the cellular activities that produce the high degree of organization characteristic of life.”

“Living organisms are thermodynamically open systems that tend to maintain a steady state rather than reaching equilibrium. …The flux of intermediates through a metabolic pathway in a steady state is more or less constant; that is, the rates of synthesis and breakdown of each pathway intermediate maintain it  at a constant concentration. a steady state far from equilibrium is thermodynamically efficient, because only a non equilibrium process can perform useful work. ”

Whereas a system reaching equilibrium would work simultaneously, an open system allows for the catabolic and anabolic pathways to work independently of each other. One turns off while turning on the  other and / or they work separate pathways at the same or different times.  Because they work separately they can change separately or evolve separately  through natural selection on either side . There can be variation in either pathway.

Example:  “If glycogen synthesis and breakdown proceed simultaneously , all that is achieved is the wasteful hydrolysis of UTP. Glycogen metabolism must therefore be controlled according to cellular needs.”

3. Change on either catabolic or anabolic pathways may put selection pressure on the other pathway to better match, and work together.

New or improved enzymes for example may quickly alter a catabolic pathway; and may well put selection pressure on the anabolic pathway to alter , match, or better regulate the other. Or vice versa.

Quote from Fundamentals of Biochemistry Voet, Voet, Pratt.

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Support Doc 2  Grand Argument

Catabolic reactions are those in which nutrients and cell parts are broken down to salvage their components and or generate energy, usually in the form of ATP.

But the energy released from ATP can be used for many varied things: anabolic reactions, mechanical work, active transport of molecules.

For ATP to be used for such varied anabolic processes, they must be separate enough from the catabolic processes to alter, change, and evolve to fit all those variety of purposes.

On the other hand the catabolic reactions are also separate and can evolve beyond ATP production to: the digestion of nutrients by breaking down molecules; the protection of the cell by breaking down of non-self molecules; and to excreting out waste, by breaking down and removing waste molecules.

Therefore anabolic processes are free to use ATP in many ways not limited by the catabolic processes that make the ATP. And Catabolic processes are separate enough to alter, change, or evolve too.

Note that the basic metabolic pathways in most organisms are essentially the same. This suggests that the anabolic uses of ATP are more varied

than the catabolic processes that make the ATP.

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Support Doc 3 Catabolic – conserved, Anabolic – varied

Start with the premise that catabolic and anabolic processes are often separate and often evolve separately.

The reason most genomes are so similar is because  catabolic processes of making energy are so similar.

The reason genomes are so different is because anabolic process use that energy for different reasons.

The catabolic processes are similar in most species groups

Two examples are all photoautotrophs, or  all heterotrophs .

PHOTOSYNTHESIS: The photosynthesis process is similar among plants, while what the plants do with the energy is different and varied.

OXIDATION: The process of oxidation of organic compounds is similar among animals, while what the animals do with the energy is different and varied

If catabolic and anabolic are separate, they  can develop separately. That suggests the following

Certain metabolic groups  may have stronger catabolic aspects than others .

Certain species may have stronger catabolic aspects than others.

One sex  may have stronger catabolic aspects than others.

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We may also look at the catabolic / anabolic processes not only as separate but in their intensity. I suggest that some biomes may have higher catabolic / anabolic rates, and some may have lower catabolic / anabolic rates.

Tropical rain forest, with high energy input, may have all its species with high catabolic AND anabolic processes.

Dry cold winter desert with  low energy input, may have all its species with low catabolic AND anabolic processes.

Certain seasons in biomes with noticeable changes in seasons may have higher catabolic / anabolic processes  due to the availability of nutrients, water, sunlight, etc.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in spring and summer than the cold of winter.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in certain biomes in the sea due to the availability of nutrients, water, sunlight etc.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in coral reefs and lower in the abyssal zone at the bottom of the ocean.

Here are two more ideas connected to the anabolic / catabolic split.

Certain seasons in biomes with noticeable changes in seasons may have higher catabolic / anabolic processes  due to the availability of nutrients, water, sunlight, etc.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in spring and summer than the cold of winter.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in certain biomes in the sea due to the availability of nutrients, water, sunlight etc.

Catabolic / anabolic processes should be higher in coral reefs and lower in the abyssal zone at the bottom of the ocean.

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Catabolic / Anabolic divisions list – new items.

CATABOLIC –  Hydrolysis

ANABOLIC – Condensation Reactions.

TYPE OF SELECTION PRESSURE  NOW. All the major metabolic pathways seen in prokaryotes probably evolved in first billion years. The catabolic processes seem to be highly conserved such that stabilizing selection predominates. Example glycolysis, the only metabolic pathway common to nearly all modern organisms.

CATABOLIC – Stabilizing Selection

ANABOLIC –  Directional and Diversifying selection.

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Support Doc 4 Pressure to Regulate

Cells can’t break down , catabolic metabolism, and build up, anabolic metabolism at the same time; unless the processes are both highly separate and highly regulated.  If life is both catabolic and anabolic pathways then by their different natures we have to also have high regulation of the two processes.

1 Two such opposite processes demand a lot of regulation.

2 There should be a lot of selection pressure to better regulate the two separate pathways.

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Support Doc 5 Two Text Quotes to Support C/A Evolve Separately

Catabolic and Anabolic pathways must be separate.

Catabolic and Anabolic are regulated by enzymes.

Enzymes have evolved to specialized organelles.

Thus I suggest that catabolic and anabolic have evolved separately and often have separate organelles. (See post of Specific Examples).

Catabolic and anabolic pathways differ.

“Chemical chaos would result if all of a cell’s metabolic pathways were open simultaneously. Imagine, for example, a substance synthesized by one pathway and broken down by another. If the two pathways were to run at the same time, the cell would be spinning its metabolic wheels. actually, the operation of each metabolic pathway is tightly regulated. Pathways are switched on and off by controlling enzyme activity….

Even when the enzymes for a metabolic pathway are individually dissolved, they may be highly concentrated along with their substrates within specialized organelles of the cell…. If the cell had the same number of enzymes for respiration , but they were diluted throughout the entire volume of the cell, respiration would be very inefficient.” Campbell, “Biology” Third Ed. p.106-107.

“”Catabolic and anabolic pathways differ. If a metabolite is converted to another metabolite by an exergonic process, free energy must be supplied to convert the second metabolite back to the first. This energetically “uphill” process requires a different pathway for at least some of the reaction steps.

The existence of independent interconversion routes … is an important property of metabolic pathways because it allows independent control of the two processes. If metabolite 2 is required by the cell, it is necessary to ‘turn off’ the pathway from 2 to 1 while ‘turning on’ the pathway from 1 to 2. Such independent control would be impossible without different pathways.” Voet, Voet, Pratt. “Fundamentals of Biochemistry”. Updated ed. p. 358.

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Support Doc 6 Catabolic – Similar, Anabolic – Great Variation

Catabolic processes to get ATP, are reasonably similar:

” A bewildering array of chemical reactions occur in any living cell.  Yet the principles that govern metabolism are the same in all organisms, a result of their common evolutionary origin and the constraints of the laws of the thermodynamics. In fact, many of the specific reactions of metabolism are common to all organisms, with variations due primarily to differences in the source of the free energy that supports them.” Voet, Voet,  Pratt, Fundamentals of Biochemistry Upgrade Ed. p. 354.

But anabolic uses of that ATP range from transport work, mechanical work, to chemical work. That suggests that the anabolic uses have evolved to a great variety of processes.

It seems that we have separate catabolic and anabolic processes. And while catabolic processes to get ATP are somewhat conserved and similar, the anabolic processes that use that ATP seem more variable

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Support Doc 7 Lysosomes

Here is an example of how catabolic pathways have evolved to

1. digestion processes

2. waste out processes.

3. protection processes

And how catabolic pathways have evolved separately from the anabolic processes.

Start with lysosomes.

Lysosomes are organelles in eukaryotic cells that contain catabolic enzymes which breakdown macromolecules for recycling. They break down waste into simple compounds that are often returned to the cytoplasm as new material . The lysosomes have a membrane that separates it from the rest of the cell and protects the rest of the cell from the lysosomes acidic digestive acids .

Lysosomes seem to have evolved as a catabolic pathway.

In some cases these lysosomes connect with food vacuoles coming into the cell (endocytosis) and waste going out of the cell (exocytosis). Each cell seems to have its own food in / waste out processes.

Though found in all eukaryotic cells, lysosomes are most numerous in disease fighting cells, examples white blood cells. Thus the processes of breaking down molecules has evolved to protecting the cell, or organism, by breaking down non-self threats.

Now put all this together. We see in every eukaryotic cell the way catabolic pathways have expanded from not just breaking down macro molecules, but

1. digestion processes

2. waste out processes.

3. protection processes

I suggest that basic catabolic bio pathways have evolved to other processes – specifically digestion, waste out, and protection processes. And that these have evolved, in many ways, separately from anabolic processes.

Support Doc 8 Digestion Part 2

Digestion.

Digestion is the best example of how catabolic pathways have  evolved and evolved separately from anabolic processes:

Note that almost all animals have a digestive tube that is separate. Digestion involves these 5 steps, 4 of which have evolved from catabolic processes:

Ingestion (catabolic), mechanical breakdown (catabolic), chemical breakdown (catabolic), absorption (anabolic), elimination (catabolic).

In almost all animals digestion takes place in a chamber within the body where food is broken down by enzymes outside the cell. Digestion has evolved to be separate from the anabolic synthesis pathways.

The process of evolution is one that builds on what went before. That means that evolution is based on the first metabolism or the first catabolic and anabolic  processes. There is nothing else to build on. And because they are such opposite bio pathways, there is separation between the two as they each evolve. There is also separate regulation of each.

Digestion was built on catabolic processes and it expanded and refined how biochemical pathways could breakdown molecules.

Once you see this step, from catabolic, to digestion, then it is easy to see how catabolic processes could evolve to not only digestion; but defense, the break down of non-self molecules; and waste out, the last step in animal digestion.

Clearly this is not  molecular biology like most are used to. It is looking at the processes on a different higher level. For me there is real insight here that shows two direct and distinct pathways that evolved out of basic metabolism processes.

Support Doc 9  Specifics from the net

The following excerpted from this website

http://www.experiencefestival.com/a/Metabolism_-_Metabolic_pathways/i…

Why is it so easy to imagine mythical fire breathing dragons, and

flying horses, but impossible to see that

catabolic and anabolic processes have evolved, and evolved

separately?  Here are some specifics:

Metabolism – Catabolism

Catabolic pathways that breakdown complex molecules into simple

compounds:

Cellular respiration, metabolic pathways that create energy (ATP and

NADPH) from fuel molecules. These pathways are also involved in the

digestion of food.

Carbohydrate catabolism

Glycogenolysis, the conversion of glycogen into glucose.

Glycolysis, the conversion of glucose into pyruvate and ATP, does not

require oxygen.

Embden-Meyerhof pathway, the common glycolysis pathway.

Entner-Doudoroff Pathway, an alternative glycolysis pathway in few

bacteria.

Pentose phosphate pathway (hexose monophosphate shunt), generation of

NADPH from glucose.

Protein catabolism, the hydrolysis of proteins into amino acids.

Aerobic respiration

Electron transfer chain

Oxidative phosphorylation

Anaerobic respiration,

Cori cycle

Lactic acid fermentation

Fermentation

Ethanol fermentation

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Metabolism – Anabolism

Anabolic pathways that create building blocks and compounds from

simple precursors:

Glycogenesis

Gluconeogenesis

Porphyrin synthesis pathway

HMG-CoA reductase pathway, leading to cholesterol and isoprenoids.

Secondary metabolism, metabolic pathways that are not essential for

growth, development or reproduction, but that usually have ecological

function.

Photosynthesis

Light-dependent reaction (light reaction)

Light-independent reaction (dark reaction)

Calvin cycle

Carbon fixation

Support Doc 10  Prove it Wrong

Let’s look at this idea the other way around,

There is a way to prove my hypothesis  about catabolic and anabolic, evolving, and evolving separately – wrong.

If the following are right then my idea is wrong.

1. Though catabolic and anabolic processes have separate regulation, they somehow can never evolve separately. They must always evolve at the same time.

2. Anabolism uses ATP. But if anabolism can never evolve, and/or evolve separately; then the first use for ATP is the first and only way any living thing can use ATP. There can never be more than one way to use ATP. If there was then it would have to have evolved to different uses.

3. Life evolves but not from metabolism.  Somehow there are examples of natural selection that does not involve metabolism, does not involve catabolism and anabolism.

Those who suggest my idea is wrong, then must defend the idea that catabolic and anabolic processes cannot evolve. Nor can they evolve separately.

And there is evolution outside of metabolism.

Here’s more:

1. If  catabolic and anabolic processes did not evolve separately then both are the same as they started. And the mix of catabolic and anabolic processes should be exactly the same – if one is 50% of the biological processes, the other is 50%. If one is 40% the other is 60%. And this never changes, no matter the species, no matter the era, no matter the environment.

But this is obviously not true.

2. If a positive mutation happened on the anabolic side, does that mean there is an immediate change in the catabolic side to exactly match? How could the 2nd side mutate instantly to keep the anabolic/catabolic processes working exactly the same?

But if they cannot evolve separately, then that would have to be true.

This is again obviously not true.

Thoughts?

Support Doc 11 Has to be one or the other

Has to be one or the other:

There is a mutation on either the  CATABOLIC or ANABOLIC side.

There are two possible scenarios that I can see:

1. The mutation on one side causes selection pressure on the other to  match.

There is selection pressure  from a mutation on one side to the other.

OR

2. The mutation on one side does NOT cause selection pressure on the other

to match.

There is no selection pressure from a mutation on one side to the other.

That means that the mutation will only affect the one side, and that  that side

can evolve separately from the other.

We have two possibilities:

EITHER  a mutation on one side causes selection pressure on the other,

OR  It does not and each side can evolve separately.

My contention is that in life both happen. And this suggests two ideas

to explore:

how a mutation on one side will put selection pressure on the other.

how a mutation on one side will allow it to evolve separately from the other.

Support Doc 12 Sum Up

My hypothesis is that catabolic and anabolic processes often evolve separately.

Here is another post on it. Once we see that each side has often evolved separately we can see that each aspect of life has a different mix of catabolic and anabolic processes. That means that everything from single cell to a large biome, will have a different mix with some cells, organelles, organisms, species, and biomes more catabolic than others. That can offer some real insight into all aspects of life.

Notes to consider:

1. Catabolic and anabolic often have separate regulation. That gives quicker, more flexible, and overall better regulation than if a single system ruled both.

2. Catabolism has evolved in many ways. Note that there are different catabolic systems to break down each of these: fats, proteins, sugars, starches.

3. Catabolism has evolved such that all fuel is not used immediately.   We can store fat till it’s needed. Catabolism kicks in when its needed, not when it is a waste of the cell’s energy.

4. Catabolism has evolved to produce powerful digestive enzymes. These need to be separate to protect the rest of the cell.  I suggest that catabolism has also evolved to attacking non-self with similar digestive enzymes, and it has evolved to processes of excreting waste out. Therefore look to digestion, protection, and waste out processes for main areas of the evolution of catabolism processes.

5.  Natural selection seems to favor little change when something works well. But when the catabolic side improves, there should be pressure on the other anabolic side to change to match. And vice versa. This suggests a process of change that is not from mutation, but from within the organism.

6. Catabolic and anabolic processes are so opposite that it seems difficult to see how they would both start up. The best guess is that these two different processes are the reflection of some duality in the environment. My suggestion is either the day – night cycle, and / or a wet-dry cycle.

7.  Each aspect of life on every level should have a different mix of catabolic and anabolic processes. If they did not then all living things would have the same constant proportion of catabolic / anabolic that never changes or evolves. That is not true.

8. We can get insight into all aspects of life by comparing those aspects that are highly catabolic – more catabolic than anabolic, as compared with those aspects of life that are highly anabolic.

Support Doc 13 Shelled Creatures

The Cambrian was an era known for the appearance of many creatures with shells . Most think these were for self defense. If true, some creatures were predators attacking, and others were prey being attacked. And the prey slowly developed hard shells as protection.

This ‘arms race’ can be considered as a race of catabolic processes versus anabolic processes.

Catabolic processes

of the attacking creatures to break down the shelled creatures

versus

Anabolic processes

of the creatures being attacked, building up tougher shells for protection.

It suggests this is another loose division of catabolic and anabolic processes, and it suggests that this division can set up arms races between species.

The largest one probably being

CATABOLIC – heterotrophs  versus  ANABOLIC – autotrophs.

Therefore catabolic and anabolic processes may be an important force of evolution.

Support Doc 14 Classifications

New Type of Classification System For Life

The Catabolic Anabolic division, may be an important way to classify life. By using a loose definition of catabolic – break down, and anabolic – build up, we can find some important dichotomies that give us some insight into how life works.

This should also introduce readers into a new way of looking at life, as an anabolic, catabolic split.

Previous posts have shown that catabolic and anabolic pathways have evolved separately.That suggests that everything is either more catabolic or more anabolic.

That suggests that every cell, organism, species, or even biome, may have more anabolic ‘build up’ than catabolic ‘breakdown’ biochemistry*.  The cell, organism, species, or biome has evolved to better adapt to its environment by stressing either catabolic or anabolic processes. Therefore we can compare groups and classify them according to their preponderance of catabolic or anabolic processes.

Here are some examples . C =  more catabolic like, A -= more anabolic like.

C. Male,  A. Female

C. Heterotroph A. Autotroph

C. Attacks Non-self A. Supports Self.

(*In the case of biomes, there may be more of both processes than other biomes.)

Support Doc 15 New Paradigm

Trying to explain all biology through the molecular level only is like trying to explain a bad mother in law’s behavior through the actions of her electrons.

Due to the groundbreaking discoveries of Watson Crick, biology has concentrated on molecular biology and replication. I suggest that it is time for a new paradigm,  not replication, but metabolism, the other side of the coin.  Not replication on the molecular level, but metabolism on larger overall levels – specially the impact of the opposite forces of catabolic and anabolic as they have evolved into other processes.

These posts have given good evidence that catabolic and anabolic are separate processes, that they are regulated separately, and that they have evolved separately to other aspects of life, yet no one seems willing to address that  or its obvious ramifications and insights.

Why? This seems like a big development. Comment?

Support Doc 16 Two for One or Twice as Fast Selection

Two for one or twice as fast selection.

Looking at life as a catabolic / anabolic split may help  explain punctuated equilibrium, symbiosis, and why there is natural selection if most mutations are negative.

The opposite but complimentary processes of catabolic and anabolic may be a motor that pushes natural selection more quickly than we had thought. Most positive changes in one side will promote a positive change in the other to catch up. Example. Human brain size grew. That was a selective advantage. But to do that the hominids needed more energy to supply the brains needs. Brain growth demanded improvements of energy. OR it could have been the other way around, and improvements on the catabolic side may have allowed the anabolic side to build larger brains.  Either way a change on one side demanded a catch up improvement on the other.

This speedier natural selection process would help explain punctuated equilibrium and why species seldom change, but when they do they seem to change in a major way.

This speedier natural selection process would also help explain the symbiosis idea of Lynn Margulis. Except in this case it is not the symbiosis of two different species, but the symbiotic changes due to the opposite but complimentary processes of catabolic and anabolic.

Selection on either catabolic or anabolic side puts pressure on the other side for change to match. If not then we have an impossible situation where every mutation would have an instant matching mutation on its counterpart. Ex. a positive mutation on catabolic processes, would have to have an exact instant positive mutation on the connected anabolic process, and that seems foolish at best. Example note fat storage. That clearly shows that the catabolic and anabolic  processes do not work exactly in tandem at the same time. How could fat reserves be stored if it did? Therefore it seems highly plausible that the two opposite but complimentary processes, have evolved separately, and are regulated separately for the flexible advantages that gives.

Support Doc 18 Two More Points

Two more points to consider:

1. Response to the argument that catabolic and anabolic did NOT evolve separately.

IF catabolic and anabolic did not evolve separately, that means they evolved together. That means that  every positive mutation on the catabolic side instantly produced a matching positive mutation on the anabolic side. That means that for every mutation there were really 2 mutations – one on the catabolic side, and one on the anabolic side. We should see mutations in pairs. This is not the case. Clearly mutations do not come in pairs. Clearly a mutation on one side does not instantly lead to a matching mutation on the other. This suggests to me that catabolic and anabolic processes evolved separately – a key argument to my hypothesis.

2. Response to the argument that catabolic and anabolic processes blended and did not evolve separately.

IF catabolic and anabolic processes  blended through time, then they would not be separate today. Clearly there are separate catabolic and anabolic processes today. That means they have stayed separate over billions of years; and that separation of these anabolic and catabolic processes has been selected for.

Support Doc 19 More on Sleep

Lately I thought of a way to test my idea of why we sleep (see below).

I figured that if sleep was part of the metabolism cycle, and mainly

concerned with processing that days food intake, then for those times

when you fasted, there should be less sleep.

We know when we eat a big meal we feel sleepy – that suggests sleep
helps process a heavy meal. But what about the other way? If we fast
do we need less sleep?

Doing a quick google of fasting and sleep, I found that that is
exactly true. Those that fast need less sleep. This helps give support
to my ideas on why we sleep. Hopefully it’ll open the door to more
research in this area.

Here is more information that supports the idea as sleep as part of the digestion cycle.

Note that after gorging themselves on a kill, lions will often sleep almost continuously for 2 or 3 days.

Support Doc 20 Considered Foolish

Quote Stuart Kauffman:

“Organisms are ad-hoc solutions to design problems. The standard view is that there are no deep theories of the deep meaning of ad-hoc contraptions. You take the things apart and find out how they work. Most biologists adhere to that view. Notions of underlying deep principles are not an anathema to them, they’re just considered foolish.”

That should now change. There are underlying deep principles. Metabolism is one of two kinds, catabolic – break down, or anabolic build up. My many posts have shown clearly that catabolic and anabolic processes must often be separate, have evolved, and have evolved separately.  To say otherwise is to go beyond reason to blind stubbornness. The people here are smart enough to understand it. Time you put aside unreasonable vague worries and look hard and see the obvious. To do otherwise , I consider foolish.

———————-

Here’s another aspect of this hypothesis.

Autoimmune diseases. My suggestion is that this is a catabolic problem. These seem that the bodies defense system is attacking not only invading non self, or digestion food, but is attacking its own self. To resolve this, look to resolving the problem with the catabolic processes that are attacking self.

———————————————————–

The following is new to file

SUPPORT Doc 21

CONSTRUCTIVE =  evolved anabolic processes

DECONSTRUCTIVE = evolved catabolic processes.

The Hypothesis:  Metabolism is catabolic and anabolic chemistry.

This hypothesis suggests that as the basic chemistries remained very

little changed over time,  they

1. evolved to new processes (perhaps through duplication of genes)

and

2. evolved separately in many cases, and

3. looking at life as often two main threads of these evolved

processes, gives new insights into life.

Catabolic chemistry, while retaining its basic chemical processes,

also evolved to some DECONSTRUCTIVE processes mostly concerned with

breaking down NON-SELF.  Mostly in DIGESTION, PROTECTION and WASTE

OUT.  See the long list of examples through these many related posts.

Anabolic chemistry, while retaining its basic chemical processes, also

evolved to some CONSTRUCTIVE processes mostly concerned with building

up SELF.

See the long list of examples through these many related posts.

SUPPORT Doc 22

Gene induction = A

Gene repression = C

growth = A

sporation = C

Cope’s Rule = A dominance

Viruses = C dominance

SUPPORT Doc 23

LIFE DEFINITION:

Chemical system that uses energy to adjust to the environment through both construcitve (build up) and deconstructive (break down) processes.

Birth =  constructive -Anabolic

Death =deconstructive – Catabolic

Happiness is the emotion in the middle.  Too hot = anger, too cold = fear, just right = happiness. Then augment or amplify it through hormones.

SOME viruses would be life. Specifically those that  both break down – the host, and build up copies.

SUPPORT Doc 23

Constructive – builds up SELF

Deconstructive – breaks down NON SELF

Alimentary canal is:

Deconstructive break down phase

Anabolic build up from nutrients phase

Deconstructive waste out phase.

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250 Responses to “Hendricks Health Theory”

  1. musea Says:

    Note that fitness could be defined as
    constructive / symbiosis
    AND/OR
    deconstructive / fight and competition.

  2. musea Says:

    Sleep – more clues to add to these other posts. This looks at melatonin, breast milk levels of melatonin, NREM and melatonin , etc.

    CLUES
    Breast milk has more melatonin at night then during the day..
    Melatonin helps control your sleep and wake cycles.
    So night breast milk feedings help the child to sleep.
    Overweight children often have less sleep and are often not breast fed.
    Melatonin is involved in the regulation of body weight, and may be helpful in treating obesity
    Children on average secrete more melatonin than adults. It decreases with age.
    Melatonin seems to be at its’ highest from 2-6 months. AND, at 4 months NREM sleep begins to precede the first REM sleep.
    Melatonin is released soon after it gets dark. The amount produced then increases until about two to four AM, and then drops off again.
    NREM sleep mostly happens early in the night and seems to be mostly over by four AM when the level of melatonin drops off.
    Melatonin has side effects of lower body temperature.
    Laughter increases the levels of breast-milk melatonin.
    NREM sleep temperature is lower than waking temperature and regulated.

    SUMMARY
    Putting it all together, II suggest that it seems plausible that

    MELATONIN PUTS YOU TO SLEEP AND KEEPS YOU TO SLEEP TILL NREM SLEEP IS OVER.
    MELATONIN LEVELS MAY BE TOO HIGH IN UNDERWEIGHT AND TOO LOW IN OVERWEIGHT CHILDREN.
    SETTING UP A PATTERN OF MELATONIN AROUND THE AGE OF 4-6 MONTHS MAY BE A KEY ASPECT OF HEALTH.
    Underweight children get too much melatonin from breast milk, and have a too low NREM temperature.
    Overweight children get too little melatonin from not enough breast milk, and have a too high NREM temperature.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/sleeping-angels/200910/can-giving-infants-pumped-breast-milk-lead-disrupted-sleep-patterns

    I recently came across a study in the journal “Nutritional Neuroscience” in which a group of researchers from Spain looked at the levels of certain substances (nucleotides) in breast milk, which are known to induce sleep. The researchers found that there was a definite pattern to when their levels were higher and lower, and that those known to induce sleep were, not surprisingly, higher in breast milk produced during the evening and nighttime than in breast milk produced during the day. In the paper (cited below), the authors also mention previous studies demonstrating that breast milk levels of melatonin, a hormone secreted prior to sleep onset, also vary in relation to the time of day, with melatonin found in breast milk produced at night, but undetectable in breast milk produced during the day.

    http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/tc/melatonin-overview
    What is melatonin?
    Melatonin is a hormone made by the pineal gland , a small gland in the brain. Melatonin helps control your sleep and wake cycles. Very small amounts of it are found in foods such as meats, grains, fruits, and vegetables. You can also buy it as a supplement.
    What does natural melatonin do in the body?
    Your body has its own internal clock that controls your natural cycle of sleeping and waking hours. In part, your body clock controls how much melatonin your body makes. Normally, melatonin levels begin to rise in the mid- to late evening, remain high for most of the night, and then drop in the early morning hours.

    Melatonin does have side effects. But they will go away when you stop taking the supplement. Side effects include:
    Sleepiness.
    Changes in blood vessels that may affect blood flow.
    Lower body temperature.

    http://members.cox.net/jmhoward3/A%20New%20Theory%20of%20Sudden%20Infant%20Death%20Syndrome.htm
    Note this is from James Michael Howard who has often commented in SBE

    Keep in mind that the time of maximum SIDS is from 2 months to six months; this is the time when melatonin starts to really increase and reduce REM sleep. Note that at 4 months, the adult pattern of significant increases in non-REM sleep begins to precede the first REM sleep. My work suggests that this is time when melatonin is exerting its most profound depression of DHEA, therefore, this should be the most deadly time for infants.

    http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/brain_and_nervous_system/medicines/100005200.html

    Melatonin is a hormone made by the pineal gland, a structure in the brain. It is normally released soon after it starts to get dark. The amount produced then increases until about two to four am, and then drops off again. Melatonin is linked with the control of circadian rhythms and promoting sleep. It works by acting on melatonin receptors in the brain.

  3. musea Says:

    READER NOTE, FROM HERE ON SOME MAIN IDEAS WERE IN DEVELOPMENT. THE EARLY POSTS ARE NOT ALWAYS THE MOST UP TO DATE.
    SPECIALLY ON SPECIFICS OF NREM AND THE WEANING PATTERN SET UP IN CHILDHOOD. (11/10)

    Most psychology experts try to find the root of anxiety, anger, or behavioral problems, in thinking patterns. Supposedly these are responses to negative past experiences in the environment.

    I think the true source for many of these problems, is not outside the body but the sleep patterns within the body. Specifically the sleep pattern set up in NREM sleep during breast feeding around the 4-6 month time period.

    My suggestion is that each day is a cycle of food in and waste out in 3 phases.

    Phase one: During waking hours we take in food.
    Phase two: During sleep we stop eating, and begin the 2nd part of the daily cycle – rest and digest, This utilizes the food we’ve taken in. (mostly NREM sleep).
    Phase three: At the end of the sleep cycle (mostly REM sleep) the body prepares waste out .

    During infancy (around 4-6 months) a pattern seems to be set up in NREM sleep.
    The pattern is usually healthy. But if it is set up with too little breast milk or too much breast milk, there are set problems that last through life.

    Too little breast milk.
    (later correction – this was first attempts to solve this – skip here and see below
    Response is hunger which leads to ANGER.
    Repressed subconscious anger problems as an adult.
    What breast milk is received is held in in childhood.
    Leads to too little food in, too little waste out.
    Sleep pattern is too high temperature in sleep.
    Life pattern is one that is always hungry for more and holds in more.
    Through life too much food is taken in – too little waste is excreted out
    Overweight problems.
    Solution: Lower sleep temperature, and resolve repressed anger.

    Too much breast milk.
    (later correction, this may be more the problem of too soon solid food such that the infant fears food except breast milk)
    Response is too full and can’t excrete out excess which leads to FEAR.
    Repressed subconscious fear problems as an adult.
    Excess breast milk is blocked out or excreted out.
    Leads to too much food in, too much waste out.
    Sleep pattern is too low temperature in sleep.
    Life pattern is one that is always fear of being too full, and too much waste is excreted out.
    Through life too little food is taken in – too much waste is excreted out.
    Underweight problems
    Solution: Raise sleep temperature and resolve repressed fear.

  4. musea Says:

    Closer and closer,

    This suggests that around 6 months of age the infant switches from breast milk to hard food. That triggers the NREM sleep pattern to begin. NREM, not rapid eye movement, or slow wave sleep, is the deep sleep part of the sleep cycle. It is not needed for processing breast milk, (only REM sleep is.) There is no NREM sleep at birth. But NREM sleep is needed for processing food other than breast milk. My suggestion is that when the baby is weaned off breast milk, he sets up a daily CHILDHOOD PATTERN of digesting and processing food in NREM sleep. Wake we eat and digest. Sleep we stop eating and process the food. Sleep is a rest and repair time.

    This Childhood pattern of NREM sleep, sticks with us, is unconscious behavior, and is almost impossible to change. IF the food in, waste out pattern, is unhealthy it sets up one of two life long problems.

    1. Not enough food in when NREM pattern set in infancy.
    OR perhaps weaned too soon and not enough solid food.
    2. Too much food in when NREM pattern set in infancy. (Not enough waste out.)
    OR perhaps weaned too soon and too much solid food

    1. Not enough food in, pattern has these keywords to describe adults with this pattern.

    Hungry always,
    overweight,
    repressed anger,
    low sleep time,
    stress on getting food nurturing from others,
    oral,
    extrovert,
    turned outward to take in more from outside,
    stress reaction – fight or befriend to get nurturing,
    feels ‘hot’,
    health problems – heart problems and obesity problems.
    psychological problems – anger or dependency

    2. Too much food in, pattern has these keywords to describe adults with this pattern.

    Feels too full always,
    underweight,
    repressed fear,
    high sleep time,
    stress to get rid of waste within self,
    anal,
    introvert,
    turned inward to get waste out,
    stress reaction – flight from waste, or tend to self ,
    feels ‘cold’,
    health problems – infections or autoimmune diseases.
    psychological problems – self absorbed, or unconnected to others.

    Now more details.

    Not enough food in when NREM pattern set in infancy:

    Leads to overweight adults. Anger at not enough nurturing/food in.Too short sleep time (too little NREM? REM?) Pattern of too little in, puts stress on non self or getting food (non self) from others (non self). Oral, extrovert to engage people for nurturing. Of four stress responses (fight, flight, tend, befriend) – fight or befriend to get more food nurturing in. Body temperature seems ‘too hot” Anger at too little food nurturing in. Health problems – heart problems. Psychological problems Anger or dependency.

    Too much food in when NREM pattern set in infancy
    Leads to underweight adults. Fear at too much food coming in and not getting enough waste out Too long sleep to process excess (too much NREM? REM?) Pattern of too much in, puts stress on self and getting non self waste out. Anal, introvert and involved with self and self excess food problems. Of four stress responses (fight, flight, tend, befriend) – tend to self and flight or separation from non self waste within. Body temperature seems “too cold”. Fear at too little waste out. Health problems – infections and autoimmune diseases. Psychological problems, Self absorbed, antisocial
    These should be pretty clearly drawn personalities.

  5. musea Says:

    This link
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129862107&sc=nl&cc=sh-20100918
    Makes the point that I have said before, each of us is a walking zoo.
    What I didn’t know is that we are 90% microbial.

    Now again I ask the group a simple question, this time with a new
    perspective.

    My hypothesis suggests that the two types of metabolism, anabolic and
    catabolic, have often evolved separately, and are regulated
    separately.

    Let’s add this. The article says, ‘there’s an estimated 100 times
    more microbial genes than the genes in our human genome. So we’re
    really a compendium… of human and microbial parts.” So does anyone
    think that if there is a catabolic gene mutation on any microbial
    genome, it is matched by an anabolic one? And if so from which
    genome, the microbe, the human genome, both,etc.

    Surely the group must admit that catabolic metabolism evolves
    sometimes separately to other deconstructive processes, and anabolic
    metabolism evolves sometimes separately to other constructive
    processes.

  6. musea Says:

    Why would we evolve a Sleep/Food Pattern, not before birth, but when the infant switches from breast milk to solids, sometime after 6 months? Secondly, why would that pattern be so important that it controls so much of our lives and health, and is almost impossible to change? (See other posts)

    Most hominids, I would think, would have a limited diet. Some dietary requirements may not always be available, or available in limited supplies. The after birth sleep/digestion pattern set up when the child switches from breast milk to solids – solids being the food available in that environment – would help compensate that infant and help him adapt to that specific environment.

    There would most often be a case of too little food in, or too little of a necessary nurturing food in. The child would develop a sleep pattern that would compensate by setting up a subconscious desire to get and eat more of the neglected nutrients.

    In the rare cases where there was too much food, it would set up a sleep/digestion pattern that would reduce the desire for that excess.

  7. musea Says:

    My sleep ideas* have suggested that anger and fear are emotions that
    evolved out of the most basic of biological processes the food in and
    waste out, digestion process.

    (wrong ideas removed)

    *Sleep is the 2nd half of a daily digestion cycle. AND a pattern of
    food in and waste out is set up after birth when the child switches to
    solids.

  8. musea Says:

    This article suggests the positive benefits of how our hunter gatherer
    parents raised their children.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100921163709.htm

  9. musea Says:

    Zeroing in on these two major problem types.

    Overweight – specific cause – too little nurturing, perhaps bottle
    fed, – leads to overweight pattern to compensate

    Underweight – specific cause – too soon switch to solids – infant is
    not developed enough to handle anything other than breast milk – leads
    to underweight pattern to compensate. UPDATE: Fear of undigested food. (11/10)

    There seems to be studies supporting both. Not breast fed – overweight
    tendencies. Too soon switched to solids – more liable to allergies
    etc.
    Could the simple fact of not breast feeding a child long enough,
    be the cause of so much of our unconscious drives and stress? This
    suggests that that is true.

    Therefore we can begin to see that this food/sleep pattern that’s set
    up sometime after 6 months is the driving force for much of the
    physical and mental attributes of the infant through adulthood.
    This suggests that psychiatry, and phycology is not going deep; enough
    to uncover the cause of stress and trauma. The initial even of stress
    or trauma may well just be
    setting off the deeper problems inherent in the food/sleep pattern set
    up in infancy.

  10. musea Says:

    Two studies on all the major benefits of breast feeding for about one year.
    Note my hypothesis that a sleep/digest pattern is set up when the infant is switched to solids, with these two main possible problems: undernourished – obesity, and solids that the child is not developed enough to digest – underweight.. Specifically too little in for overweight, too much (of wrong solids ) in for underweight.

    http://www.breastfeeding.com/all_about/all_about_more.html

    http://kidshealth.org/parent/growth/feeding/breast_bottle_feeding.html# (click to second page for page of benefits.

  11. musea Says:

    Breast feeding report card – it’s not good.
    http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/reportcard.htm

  12. musea Says:

    This food in/ waste out sleep pattern has some important ramifications if true *

    1. It is possible that the bulk of psychology has not delved deep enough, that the true cause of most human problems (outside of genetic problems, accidents, or basic health needs like enough clean food and water) is the food in/waste out sleep pattern set up when the child is weened onto solids.

    2. That this period of setting up an infant development pattern of food in and waste out, may be like learning language. We can only learn to speak a native tongue during a certain window of opportunity. And that once that is set, it is set for life, So too may be the food in/ waste out sleep pattern.

    3. The psychological term of unconscious or subconscious may now be defined more exactly as the “sleep mind” as opposed to the wake mind. We are subconsciously driven by the sleep pattern set up in childhood. And that is what we have been calling our subconscious or unconscious mind.

    4. That finding a way to resolve this unconscious infant pattern, should resolve the inner conflict problems they cause. Many feel torn between what seems the best healthiest behavior and an inner driven selfish behavior. That may well be the difference between the wake mind and the sleep mind. AND resolving that conflict should end the problem.

    5 The first problem to end will be the inner conflicts. That in turn will end the transference problem – that is blaming our conflicts on , not ourselves or the conflicts within, but transferring them to innocent others. Thus on a larger scale, as more and more people resolve the sleep pattern conflicts, they should resolve the social problems that they caused. There should be a lessening of all tensions in all social relationships.

    * Note this hypothesis can be easily tested. Specific weening problems, should lead to their corresponding specific personality types – overweight personality or underweight personality .

  13. musea Says:

    From a biological point of view, I’m seeing sleep as the most important aspect of humans. Waking time, is getting and breaking down food from outside the body, but sleep is when the food is utilized inside the body, and when waste is gotten rid of.

    Think of waking as dealing with the non-self outer world – the world outside the self. It’s purpose is to get food. Then the purpose of sleep is to deal with the self, the inner world, using energy to repair and excrete out waste that is within. With that in mind…

    I find this on ANGER and FEAR. Anytime a person has an over reaction to stress that goes beyond reason then it is because the stress triggers UNCONSCIOUS or SUBCONSCIOUS sleep pattern problems. This is a big switch for our thinking.

    Triggered ANGER – is a response to unconscious trauma in UPDATE – REM SLEEP (11/10), concerning FOOD IN,*

    Triggered FEAR – is a response to unconscious trauma in UPDATE = NREM SLEEP (11/10), concerning WASTE OUT.*

    Fear – NREM sleep or deep sleep – food in trauma
    Anger – REM sleep – waste out trauma

    *The trauma comes from problems in the food in/sleep waste, sleep pattern set up in childhood.

  14. musea Says:

    This is about consciousness and a suggestion why we evolved consciousness.

    Consciousness is a late addition to life. Life has existed for billions of years without consciousness. Most living things do NOT have consciousness.

    So why did it evolved?

    More and more I see sleep as being more vital and basic to life than we ever expected. So much so that I see waking hours as a late addition, not a key aspect of our lives.
    And sleep not as a secondary state, but the basic state that consciousness is built on.

    Consciousness. There seems to be three levels. Two in sleep and one during wake.

    During sleep we have NREM or slow wave sleep, alternating with REM sleep. Then we wake and repeat the daily cycle.

    Here are the three levels of consciousness.

    1. No consciousness – NREM sleep
    2. Semi Consciousness – REM sleep
    3. Wake – waking hours.

    1. No consciousness, (also unconsciousness or subconsciousness). This is NREM sleep. This is the part of the daily food in and waste out cycle concerned with replenishing the body. This is so vital that it is the most basic of life processes. It is almost exclusively concerned with within the body.

    2. Semi conscious sleep. This is REM sleep. This is the part of the daily food in and waste out cycle concerned with getting waste out of the body. This probably came as the next step in evolving consciousness. REM sleep is also the sleep where we have most dreams. Now it looks to me like REM sleep was the first step in evolving to full consciousness. We were literally waking up, and this was a middle step to full consciousness. This is mostly concerned with within the body, but there is also some awareness of the surroundings.

    3. Wake. This is the waking hours. This is the part of the daily food in and waste out cycle concerned with taking in food, eating food, getting nurturing from outside. This was the last step to the evolution of consciousness. I think its main purpose is to get food from outside the body to replenish the body.

    Consciousness can then perhaps be defined, as the evolved state of awareness to outside stimuli that enhances and supports getting food in, that then is processed for use in the body through NREM and REM sleep.

    Part of consciousness was to evolve fight or flight, or fight/anger and flight/fear, or anger and fear emotions to react to outside stress, to help get more food in, and to protect from outside dangers.

    So this suggests that, from a basic biological perspective, sleep not waking is the more important part of our lives!

    Daily cycle:
    1. Consciousness – Wake – eat, take in food from outside. Outside the body awareness.
    2. No Consciousness – NREM sleep – stop eating, turn to self, use food to nurture, repair and build the self within. No outside awareness.
    3. Semi Consciousness – REM sleep – no eating, turn to waste in self, and prepare to excrete out. Some outside awareness.

    Wake up and repeat.

  15. musea Says:

    Start with a mutation to a CATABOLIC (or deconstructive) process.
    This can:

    1. Be offset by anabolic processes already in place.
    2. Make no difference to anabolic processes, such that the two evolve separately.
    3. Support anabolic processes and enhance their outcome or performance.
    4. Spur anabolic processes to match or catch up or improve to fit – selection pressure to match.

    OR Vice versa –
    Start with a mutation to an ANABOLIC (or constructive) process etc.

    1. Mitigates mutations
    2. Allows for separate evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes.
    3. Enhances mutations
    4. Spurs mutation or change to match and correct imbalance.

    Let’s use a specific example. This is a single mutation in whippet dogs.

    “Increased muscle size and improved racing performance in whippet dogs have been traced to a single base-pair change, which inactivates a signal that normally suppresses muscle growth.” – Scientific American “From Atoms to Traits” By D. M. Kingsley.

    In this case this mutation would lead to much bigger dogs. I would consider this an anabolic/constructive mutation, not a catabolic/deconstructive one. Therefore:

    We started with a mutation to a ANABOLIC (or constructive) process.
    This can:

    1. Be offset by catabolic processes already in place.
    2. Make no difference to catabolic processes, such that the two evolve separately.
    3. Support catabolic processes and enhance their outcome or performance.
    4. Spur catabolic processes to match or catch up or improve to fit – selection pressure to match.

    1. (above) Mitigates mutations
    2. Allows for separate evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes.
    3. Enhances mutations
    4. Spurts mutation or change to match and correct imbalance.

    Now let’s take our specific example and go through the possibilities:

    1. Be offset by catabolic processes already in place.
    Not in this case, the dogs are very different. Compare a slender silhouette and a hulking animal that looks twice the size and twice as tall.
    2. Make no difference to catabolic processes, such that the two evolve separately.
    Not in this case, the difference would require extra catabolic support
    3. Support catabolic processes and enhance their outcome or performance.
    Yes, but that would not be enough in this case.
    4. Spur catabolic processes to match or catch up or improve to fit – selection pressure to match.
    Yes. In this case the much larger and muscular dog would need greater energy throughout his life. That would demand that catabolic processes match the anabolic growth from the single mutation.

    1. Mitigates mutations
    2. Allows for separate evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes.
    3. Enhances mutations
    4. Spurs mutation or change to match and correct imbalance.

  16. musea Says:

    These quotes suggest that NREM sleep is anabolic in nature, as I have suggested.

    Understanding sleep and dreaming by William H. Moorcroft, Paula Belcher.
    This from http://tinyurl.com/2cbsxzu

    “During NREMS (Not Rapid Eye Movement Sleep) there is a decrease of catabolic hormones and an increase of anabolic hormones in the body.”

    Neuroendocrine correlates of sleep/wakefulness Cardinali, Pandi-Perumal

    “During NREM sleep there are decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate, and release of anabolic hormones…. The concomitance of these events gives credence to the notion that NREM sleep is functionally associated with anabolic and cytoprotective processes.”

    Handbook of Sleep Medicine, Shneerson

    “The reduction in physical and metabolic activity during NREM sleep switches the balance between catabolism and anabolism in favour of the latter and this is accentuated by the secretion of several anabolic hormones, such as growth hormone. Overall, NREM sleep appears to be a phase in which energy is conserved while food cannot be obtained….”

    Sleep Medicine, Aldrich.
    “A bodily restorative function for NREM sleep is supported by hormonal changes: Levels of anabolic hormones such as growth hormone, testosterone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone increase, while levels of catabolic hormones such as cortisol, decrease.”

    Sleep, dreaming and sleep disorders: an introduction
    “During NREM there is a decrease of catabolic hormones and an increase of anabolic hormones in the body (Chapter 2). The catabolic hormones tend to wear the body out, while the anabolic hormones tend to build up and restore the body.”

  17. musea Says:

    Summary Sleep

    There are many new, and as yet untested ideas coming out about sleep. 1. It is the 2nd half of a daily digestion system. We eat during the day and begin to break down food. We stop eating in sleep and begin to use the food to refresh and repair. Then prepare waste out. NREM sleep may be more about refresh and repair. REM sleep may be more about waste out. 2. When the infant switches to solids (6 months or later) he sets up a one time digestion/sleep pattern. If too little nurturing (low nutrient breast milk or bottle milk etc) he will become the overweight personality – always hungry. Overweight = repressed anger. If too much solids in before digestive tract is ready, he will become the underweight personality. Always full. Underweight = repressed fear. This pattern of sleep/digestion in infancy, may be the bulk of unconscious behavior. These new ideas stress how important this pattern is to every aspect of mental and physical health and well being. More at
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  18. musea Says:

    UPDATED 11/10
    Why overweight or underweight, has proved to be one difficult problem to solve. Here is the latest. The NEW info here is that underweight may be the weaning problem of food taken in, other than breast milk, that can’t be yet processed by the infant. See the short article at bottom. This is getting closer.

    We have two weaning problems, overweight and underweight. Both seem to be problems from too early weaning. Both seem to be the response to a food in and waste out pattern set up during the weaning process. Both seem to have sleep components as sleep is half of the digestion cycle. But why are they so different?

    Overweight – problem of UPDATE – REM /catabolic sleep? Not enough breast milk in, weaned too early. Weaning pattern – always hungry for more breast milk, repressed anger – moves towards others, or against others to get more. Oral or Hungry personality. Wants more in and less excreted out.

    Underweight – problem of UPDATE – NREM /anabolic sleep? “babies do not have the stomach enzymes to process the foods, and in fact, this sort of situation causes damage to the intestinal linings” (see below) always too full of food they couldn’t process, repressed fear – moves away from others. Anal personality. Wants less in and more excreted out.

    UPDATE – NOTE that the overweight person moves towards or against others and is social by nature.
    While the underweight person moves towards self or against waste in self and is self oriented by nature.

    Quote
    “There are stats, but what the evidence overwhelmingly shows is that there IS a STRONG correlation to too early feeding of solids AND early weaning. The evidence shows that young babies do not have the STOMACH ENZYMES to process the foods, and in fact, this sort of situation causes damage to the INTESTINAL LININGS. When the babies are very young, their immune systems are in hyper-drive, but are not very good at their jobs. One of the biggest problems with too early solids is that these children later develop food allergies. Also, early weaning IS associated with a number of childhood problems including constant illnesses. In fact, there are suggestions that a number of mental illnesses including Autism, ADHD, and others are related to improper digestion, esp in infancy. There are several well-founded famous cases where some kids’ Autism or ADHD was unexpectedly reversed due to drastic diet change. When you study pre-cursers to mental illness, one thing that studies have shown repeatedly is early feeding problems. (I know this is true in my own family as well). They don’t know exactly why, but the correlation is there. In fact in adults with mental illness, one of the physical correlations is a variety of stomach/digestive problems. That is; mentally ill people have a much higher rate of

  19. musea Says:

    NREM or slow wave sleep seems to have a connection with type 2 Diabetes.
    Google search of ‘diabetes+sleep’ gives results with summaries such as:

    Not only does sleep rest your body and refresh your mind, but a solid night’s sleep is crucial to good diabetes health.

    Not sleeping? Check your blood sugar levels. Lack of sleep and diabetes often go hand in hand.

    Sleeping too little for too long raises the risk of diabetes…

    Suppression of slow-wave sleep in healthy young adults significantly decreases their ability to regulate blood-sugar levels ….

    [Next page of search adds these]

    Typically, sleep deprived people tend to crave high carbohydrate foods, which ….

    In type 2 diabetes, sleep disturbances are believed to be common…

    Research shows that it is likely in people with type 2 diabetes that more than 50% suffer from some form of sleep disorder ….

    Study of more than 36,000 people highlights gene linking type 2 diabetes and sleeping disorders.

    Too little sleep may raise diabetes risk

    [This is the best full article:
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080101093903.htm

    Note this is the NREM or slow wave or deep sleep that I suggest people with overweight problems have a problem with.]

  20. musea Says:

    More and more I see sleep as the main aspect of health in all individuals. This is something very new to our usual approach to sleep.

    This post looks at WAKE (defined as the, not NREM or REM sleep, or the waking phase) as key to the individual dealing with the outside world or non self world.

    And SLEEP (defined as NREM or REM sleep) as key to the individual dealing with the health and well being of self.

    WAKE – non self, interaction with outside world
    SLEEP emphasis on building and repairing the individual.

    Most scientists have always considered waking time as the bulk of what is important in life, with sleep as a necessary diversion that we need, but no one knows why. My ideas see it differently. I see it this way: Sleep is the key to self health. Wake is the key to interaction to support that self help.

    Let’s look at wake and sleep differences.

    WAKE: outside self life, dealing with non-self – eating , sex, and child care – all dealing with people or things outside the individual.

    SLEEP: non social, dealing with self or the individual – building and repairing body / excreting out waste from the body.

    Wake (not NREM OR REM state) Mostly interaction with outside world. Consciousness helps deal with environment outside self. Main goals, get food and eat, sex, and child care. Mostly involves interaction with others or things outside self.

    Sleep (REM OR REM state) Mostly action to support self or inside world.
    Unconsciousness shuts out outside stimuli. Helps deal with self. Main goals, use food to build and repair. Remove waste from self.

    Do you see how this changes everything? Sleep is the key to self health. Wake is the key to interaction to support that self help.

    Though nothing in life study is cut and dried, or without exception; it seems to me that we can look at sleep as not this down time annoyance, but instead the key to all self health and well being.

  21. musea Says:

    These new ideas on sleep suggest some new guidelines to better health.

    1. Breast feed all children – preferably from the biological mother.
    2. Extend breast feeding longer than the suggested 6 month period.
    3. Make sure to get enough sleep. That is the key period for body repair and growth.
    4. Recognize that there is a weaning pattern set up at birth. It can lead to one of three personalities: underweight, overweight, and moderate weight. This hidden weaning response pattern needs to be changed for those who are chronically underweight or overweight.

  22. musea Says:

    Developing my sleep ideas has led to this on panic attacks.

    Panic attacks and excess anxiety seems to be from trauma in NREM, or deep sleep, or slow wave sleep. This is the period when the body builds and repairs itself. The real trauma that causes panic attacks is unresolved nurturing problems in NREM sleep.

    Food in and waste out patterns are set up during weaning. Trauma from this pattern causes the unconscious nurturing anxiety in NREM sleep. That sleep anxiety is then triggered by waking events. Then a panic attack.

    Note clues like night sweats, night terrors, sleep walking, sleep panics, all in NREM sleep.

    The only way to resolve anxiety disorders seems to be to resolve the unconscious NREM conflicts.

  23. musea Says:

    Freud right and wrong. While developing my hypothesis, I’ve found two specific things where I disagree with Freud. Many of his ideas broke new ground and ushered in new discoveries on how humans behave. Some I agree with, many I do not. I think his disciple Karen Horney may have had the more accurate insights that may well prove to be the more correct ideas on personality and those that are more tied in to the biology that determines ones personality.

    Here are two ideas of Freud’s that I do NOT agree with.

    1. Too much breast feeding is harmful.
    Freud mapped out the oral personality as both an infant that had too little, or had too much breast feeding. I think the oral personality is ONLY that infant that had too little breast feeding. I don’t see any problem in an infant having too much, or being breast fed for too long a time. A child will naturally block out any excess at some point.. Breast milk as I’ve shown in many studies is the most perfect infant food.

    2. Anal personality is a reflection of toilet training trauma.
    Freud suggested that the earlier breast feeding / oral stage in development, is followed by the anal stage where toilet training has a great effect on personality. I disagree with that. Every human infant is breast fed. That’s a biological connection with every child. But toilet training trauma would seem to be a more recent, type problem, that comes from the rules of behavior of civilizations. It seems to have no biological basis.
    What may prove to be true is that the anal personality is not a reflection of toilet training trauma but more a reflection of a deeper biological split.

  24. musea Says:

    The Little Brain,
    Many of my posts talk about the digestive system, sleep, and food in and waste out. Now I find out that there is a “2nd Brain” or “little brain”, or nerve bundle containing more nerve cells that the spinal cord and it is in the digestive tract.
    It was recently rediscovered by Milchael Gershon at Columbia U..
    http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/199905/our-second-brain-the-stomach

    The second brain – more.
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=gut-second-brain
    Quote:
    We likely evolved this intricate web of nerves to perform digestion and excretion “on site,” rather than remotely from our brains through the middleman of the spinal cord.
    My idea is that we have two brains, both at their most basic, deal with food in and waste out the key to all life behavior and evolution.

    Head brain , or brain around mouth, takes in nurturing.

    Gut brain or second brain, or Enteric Nervous System, takes food from mouth to anus, extracting necessary nutrients and eliminating waste. The brain in our gut, the “enteric nervous system” manages every aspect of digestion, from the esophagus to the stomach, small intestine and colon.

    I would contend that we sleep to support the gut brain, and that it may be the true unconscious or subconscious brain that psychologists talk about.

    This also suggests that there may be a catabolic brain – the head brain,
    and an anabolic brain – the gut brain.

    This gives support to my food in /waste out hypothesis, my sleep as part of a daily digestion cycle, hypothesis, and the catabolic/ anabolic split, hypothesis.

  25. musea Says:

    More on the enteric nervous system
    This from http://altmedangel.com/gutbrain.htm
    It turns out that both our gut and our brain originate early in embryogenesis from the same clump of tissue which divides during fetal development. While one section turns into the central nervous system, another piece migrates to become the enteric nervous system. Later the two nervous systems connect via a cable called the vagus nerve — the longest of all the cranial nerves whose name is derived from Latin, meaning “wandering.”  The vagus nerve meanders from the brain stem through the neck and finally ends up in the abdomen. There’s the brain-gut connection.
    My contention is that the gut brain or ENS, is the unconscious or subconscious mind as suggested in psychology. It rules the basic aspects of food in and waste out. This sometimes conflicts with the head brain which seems to be more directed to outside stimuli, and taking in food from outside.
    The ENS seems to be more about utilizing food when inside, and excreting waste out.
    The two brain aspect of humans, seems to support my four options idea of food in and waste out. Each brain system seems to be loosely centered on two of the four options. Wake and sleep may also be an aspect of this two brain system.
    Head brain:
    1 takes in food
    2. Block out non food
    Gut brain
    3. utilizes nurturing
    4. excretes out waste.

  26. musea Says:

    The classic Pavlov dog experiments suggest some interesting ideas connected to the little brain, or Enteric Nervous System – the part of the nervous system that controls most of the digestion process. Pavlov was studying the digestive system of dogs and how it connected with the NERVOUS SYSTEM.

    Look at the experiment. We have a dog’s DIGESTIVE system that responds to first food and a bell, then just to a bell. It does this through REPETITION.
    The reflex action of the flow of saliva comes from repeated conditioning.

    When reading this I saw that the ENS, or little brain, that runs the bulk of the digestive process was probably the part of the nervous system that was changing due to the repeated messages that were conditioning the dog. – because that is the part of the nervous system that rules digestion from the saliva response on through the alimentary canal.

    That suggests that the ENS or little brain, seems to be able to change through repeated messages. Putting the pieces together it suggests some very astounding possibilities.

    The ENS rules the digestive process.
    The ENS seems to be related to the unconscious or subconscious actions. (see other posts).
    Pavlov’s experiments show that the ENS and the digestive system can change, not through reasoning, but through repetition – repeated conditioning.

    That suggests the possibility that behaviors of the unconscious or subconscious can be changed through repeated conditioning. They would include all actions of the digestive system. But they may also include any other actions that the ENS controls, which I have suggested may be very great indeed!

    Here is a case of a classic experiment leading to unexpected possibilities.

  27. musea Says:

    For more on the gut brain or ENS see
    http://whyfiles.org/026fear/physio1.html

  28. musea Says:

    This web page suggests that some aspects of the ENS are still under development up to 18 months post term. It also gives support for my idea that a food in and waste out pattern is set up around the time of weaning when other food is first introduced.

    http://tinyurl.com/2fdqnmm
    Quote
    There is a growing and emerging body of evidence that suggests that nutrition in early life has permanent consequences for long term health and development. Many human fetuses and infants born prematurely have to adapt to a limited supply of nutrients. If this occur at a critical period of growth ie during a period of rapid cell division then nutrition may exert a long lasting of permanent effect on their physiology and metabolism. Lucas has coined the term programming for this form of metabolic entrainment (1). Widdowson and McCance (2) showed that even brief periods of undernutrition at a critical period may permanently reduce the numbers of cells in particular organs at such times. For the central and enteric nervous system the critical period of growth is from 25-26 weeks gestation through to 18 months post term. Thus under or malnutrition during this time may programme the later performance of both the central and enteric nervous systems.
    A number of studies have shown the following general features of programming in the human infant:
    * In preterm infants, the period of nutritional sensitivity extends post term and throughout infancy.
    * Infants born at full term remain sensitive to nutritional programming through at least the 1 st year of life.
    * In infants born small for gestational age at term the adverse long term effects of poor fetal growth may be ameliorated by nutritional management in infancy.
    * Specific nutrient status of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, Ca, Fe, PO4 and energy may have selective long term programming effects in infancy.
    * Non-nutrient factors in human milk may also programme health and developmental outcomes.

  29. musea Says:

    Does anyone that has read these posts, see how this is coming together? There are critics for sure, what hypothesis doesn’t have them, but some must see how all this connects up.

    When we look at life, not as a gene replication system; but as a metabolic system we have many important insights:

    1. Metabolism is anabolic or catabolic reactions. Each has evolved and evolved separately.

    2. The bulk of all processes of all living things is the anabolic and catabolic or food in and waste out system.

    3. The origin of life was probably the most stable reaction to a day/night cycle in the environment, a day night cycle that led to a dual anabolic and catabolic chemical response.

    4. There’s a daily digestion cycle.

    5. We sleep as the nurturing and restorative aspect of the daily digestion cycle. During waking hours we take in food, and eat.

    6. ENS is the digestion brain and may be the unconscious or subconscious mind as outlined in psychology. Pavlov’s experiments show that repetition may change the ENS. Brain activity during sleep may be mostly the ENS.

    7. There may be a digestion pattern set up by the ENS when the child is weaned. This may be a key unconscious or subconscious motivation throughout the life. The main problem for both overweight and underweight problems is connected to not enough breast milk and/or weaning too soon.

    8. Digestion has evolved from a brain along the digestive tract, the ENS , to also an added head brain by the mouth at the head of the digestive tract. The head brain also seems to monitor the main senses which have congregated around the mouth: taste, smell, sight, and hearing.

  30. musea Says:

    The Enteric Nervous system seems to be somehow involved with serotonin as much or more than the head brain.

    Note these clue words serotonin, digestive functions, hunger and satiety, sleep cycles.They all support my general hypothesis.

    1.
    http://www.ehow.com/how-does_5179940_serotonin-affect-sleep_.html

    Serotonin Basics
    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that relays information to different parts of the brain. Serotonin regulates many of the vital systems in the body, including our cardiovascular, immune, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotonin also indirectly or directly controls most brain functions, such as mood, sexual function, and sleep cycles.

    2.
    Dictionary.com
    “In the brain, serotonin acts as a neurotransmitter that is involved in the control of pain perception, the sleep-wake cycle, and mood. Serotonin is also produced in some bacteria and plants.”

    3.
    http://www.johnshopkinshealthalerts.com/alerts/digestive_health/JohnsHopkinsDigestiveDisordersHealthAlert_408-1.html

    Although serotonin is best known for its role as a mood-boosting brain chemical, it is also involved in many digestive functions and in the perception of pain. In fact, more serotonin is found in the stomach than in the brain, and the GI tract is very sensitive to changes in its serotonin level. The researchers concluded that IBS may arise from abnormalities in serotonin levels responsible for digestive functions.

    The brain and the ENS communicate constantly, and their functions sometimes overlap. For example, both “brains” control emptying of the stomach. Still, it appears that more messages are sent from the ENS. The ENS warns the brain about any toxins in the stomach so that both brains can coordinate an appropriate response. It also sends the brain signals of hunger and satiety.

  31. musea Says:

    Here are two pages on serotonin. Remember it’s mostly secreted by the ENS.
    These support my hypothesis.

    http://pages.prodigy.net/unohu/topics_sero.htm

    “This neurotransmitter regulates
    · the onset of sleep,
    · sensory perception,
    · mood and depression,
    · body temperature,
    · hyperacusis (noise sensitivity)…
    · photophobia (sensitivity to light)

    Low levels may contribute to muscle weakness and stiffness experienced by Fibromyalgia sufferers.”
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / M.E. / Fibromyalgia Information, Treatment & Support

    “Serotonin is found extensively in the human gut, as well as in the blood stream.”
    Wikipedia: Serotonin

    Serotonin Levels
    Normal Serotonin Levels
    “Regulates sleep, reduces pain and appetite, and generally calms you down and improves your mood. (Page 46)”
    Book: Somer, Elizabeth, M.A., R.D. Food & Mood. Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 1999.

    Low Seratonin Levels
    “Low levels of serotonin are associated with
    · increased carbohydrate cravings
    · depression
    · heightened sensitivity to pain, and
    · troubled sleep patterns (Page 144)”
    —————————————————————–

    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/23/health/23gut.html?pagewanted=all

    But 95 percent of the body’s serotonin is housed in the gut, where it acts as a neurotransmitter and a signaling mechanism. The digestive process begins when a specialized cell, an enterochromaffin, squirts serotonin into the wall of the gut, which has at least seven types of serotonin receptors. The receptors, in turn, communicate with nerve cells to start digestive enzymes flowing or to start things moving through the intestines.

    Serotonin also acts as a go-between, keeping the brain in the skull up to date with what is happening in the brain below. Such communication is mostly one way, with 90 percent traveling from the gut to the head. …

    In a healthy person, after serotonin is released into the gut and initiates an intestinal reflex, it is whisked out of the bowel by a molecule known as the serotonin transporter, or SERT, found in the cells that line the gut wall.

  32. musea Says:

    Breast feeding as the key to both overweight and underweight problems.

    My idea is that the lack of at least one year of breast feeding for infants is causing both overweight and underweight problems across the world.

    My idea is that weaning sets up a food in and waste out pattern – probably in the ENS, Enteric Nervous System, that subconsciously programs us for our lives. If there is not enough breast milk before that weaning period – the infant will be ‘hungry’ from then on. He will move toward food and become overweight.
    If the weaning is too soon such that the child’s digestion system can’t handle the new non-breast milk, solids, then the child will always be ‘too full’ (of food he can’t yet digest) from then on. He will move away from food and become underweight.

    The rates now for children being breast fed for 1 year are almost at 0%
    http://www.kellymom.com/writings/ross-data.html

    Time to promote one year of breast feeding for all mothers in all countries.

    This should be easy to test. Those with weight problems – either underweight or overweight – should be infants that were NOT breast fed for one year.

    Those without weight problems should be infants that were breast fed for at least one year.

    • musea Says:

      > My idea is that weaning sets up a food in and waste out pattern –
      > probably in the ENS, Enteric Nervous System, that subconsciously
      > programs us for the rest of our lives. If there is not enough breast
      > milk before that weaning period – the infant will be ‘hungry’ from
      > then on. He will move toward food and become overweight.

      This update – I suggest now that this pattern is formed during the
      entire length of the breast feeding period and continues through the
      weaning period.
      >
      > If the weaning is too soon such that the child’s digestion system
      > can’t handle the new non-breast milk, solids, then the child will
      > always be ‘too full’ (of food he can’t yet digest) from then on. He
      > will move away from food and become underweight.

      This update on OVERWEIGHT –
      Seems that formula fed infants grow quicker than breast fed, but they
      are also more prone to overweight.
      I think this is the key to overweight problems.

      This update on the child’s digestion system and UNDERWEIGHT.
      http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v468/n7327_supp/full/468S5a.html

      “Although they are carbohydrates, HMOs (human milk oligosaccharides)
      do not appear to nourish infants. Instead they feed certain gut
      bacteria, giving them a competitive edge over other species. “When a
      child is born its gut is rapidly populated by pathogenic bacteria,”
      says Lebrilla. “However as the child is fed human milk the population
      changes to beneficial species.” Bifidobacterium infantis, which
      protects against diarrhoea, is particularly efficient at metabolizing
      the small-mass HMOs that are abundant in early lactation4. So breast
      milk gives B. infantis an advantage over other species in establishing
      a gut population. “The mother is therefore ‘selecting’ specific
      bacteria to grow in the infant’s gut by her HMOs,” says Lebrilla.

      Furthermore, some HMOs can inhibit harmful bacteria and viruses
      directly. For example, certain HMOs block the binding of Campylobacter
      jejuni, the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea, to intestinal
      mucosa, and thereby inhibiting pathogenesis5.

      Human milk also delivers some microbes directly to the gut. Breast
      milk is laced with several species of lactic acid bacteria from the
      mother’s intestine that are thought to travel to her mammary glands
      inside white blood cells. Most of these species inhibit pathogenic
      bacteria by secreting hydrogen peroxide and compounds called
      bacteriocins.

      The past decade has seen a large extension in the list of
      immunological factors detected in human milk. Breast milk was long
      thought to provide only passive immunity to infants, through maternal
      antibodies in the form of secretory immunoglobulin A. However, the
      newly identified crop of immune-regulatory proteins could be prompting
      and modulating development of the infant’s own immune system. Of
      particular interest are cytokines, which orchestrate the immune system
      by signalling between its cells.

  33. musea Says:

    Add on
    Before 1900, most mothers breastfed their infants. Breastfeeding rates declined sharply worldwide after 1920, when evaporated cow’s milk and infant formula became widely available. These were promoted as being more convenient for mothers and more nutritious than human milk. Breastfeeding rates began rising again in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

  34. musea Says:

    Melatonin, sleep, ENS, etc. Here is another key hormone that is concentrated in the gut (like Serotonin). Melatonin is traditionally thought of in connection with sleep – note my idea of sleep as half of a daily digestion cycle.

    Melatonin is a crucial hormone which is evolutionarily conserved across all nearly all animals, indicating that it is essential to health. Most know that it is produced in the pineal gland of the brain during sleep, but it is less well known that it is abundantly produced by the gut. Much of the body’s melatonin gathers in the gut, where melatonin concentrations are 100-fold greater than in blood and 400-fold greater than in the pineal gland. [15]
    In the gut melatonin reduces inflammation, stimulates immune function, fosters tissue repair and helps regenerate the epithelium. [15] Melatonin also has antimicrobial effects. [16]http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?cat=48

  35. musea Says:

    Letter to Dr. Gershon
    Dr. Michael Gershon, (one of the prominent researchers on the ENS)

    When I found out about the ENS it fit into many ideas I was working
    on, that I wanted to share with you. I welcome any comments.

    By looking at life as an evolved catabolic and anabolic system, it
    suggests many possible ideas connected with the ENS.

    1
    Sleep is the 2nd half of a daily digestion cycle.
    During waking hours we eat, during sleeping hours we stop eating and
    begin using the nurturing to replenish the body and prepare waste out.
    We wake and repeat.
    2.
    ENS may be the sleep brain that is very active during NREM, while the
    head brain is less active.
    3.
    ENS may be similar to the subconscious or unconscious mind as
    suggested in psychology.
    4.
    Serotonin and melatonin seemed to be most secreted in ENS. This
    suggests that the things they are connected to, are under the control
    of the ENS such as sleep cycles, anxiety, etc.
    5.
    Anxiety and fear seem to be connected to the ENS. Anger does not seem
    to be.
    6.
    The ENS seems to respond to repetition. This was shown by Pavlov’s
    classic experiments.
    7.
    A food pattern is set up during the weaning period in the ENS, after
    birth, that sets up the food in and waste out pattern for life. If
    there is too little breast milk , or weaning is too soon, one of two
    main problem types happen – overweight – always hungry, or underweight
    – too soon weaned with food that can’t yet be digested .

    Tom Hendricks
    (editor of the 18 year old zine Musea)

  36. musea Says:

    There’s more than just melatonin and serotonin connected to the ENS.
    This quote from Wikipedia suggests:
    1. ENS may have been an earlier brain than the head brain
    2. Dopamine – connected to reward and desire to eat is connected to
    the ENS.

    “In vertebrates the enteric nervous system includes efferent neurons,
    afferent neurons, and interneurons, all of which make the enteric
    nervous system capable of carrying reflexes and acting as an
    integrating center in the absence of CNS input. The sensory neurons
    report on mechanical and chemical conditions. Through intestinal
    muscles, the motor neurons control peristalsis and churning of
    intestinal contents. Other neurons control the secretion of enzymes.
    The enteric nervous system also makes use of more than 30
    neurotransmitters, most of which are identical to the ones found in
    CNS, such as acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin. “

  37. musea Says:

    More on ENS – seems to be the earlier brain in vertebrates.
    From,
    http://whyfiles.org/026fear/physio1.html

    “When animals began doing more than just eating (say choosing a good
    wine to complement dinner), they evolved that better-known brain in
    the skull. But instead of replacing the downstairs brain, the upstairs
    brain was hooked up to it. And it turns out that both brains originate
    from a structure called the neural crest, which appears and divides
    during fetal development to form both thinking machines.

    The enteric nervous system, present in all vertebrates (defined), has
    these functions: to regulate the normal (digestive) activity of the
    digestive system and prepare it for whatever its future may hold:
    whether it be sampling lobster thermidor or dodging a headlong charge
    from the king of the tigers. …

    “And while this nervous system isn’t protected by a skull, many of its
    structures and chemicals parallel those of the mainframe brain. It has
    sensory and motor neurons, information processing circuits, and the
    glial cells (defined). It uses the major neurotransmitters: dopamine,
    serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide and norepinephrine. It even has
    benzodiazepines, chemicals of the family of psychoactive drugs that
    includes Valium and Xanax.”

  38. musea Says:

    Steven J. Gould said, “We are glorious accidents of an unpredictable process with no drive to complexity.”

    But I don’t think that’s true. There is a drive to complexity – specifically better catabolic and anabolic processes. This is a drive to complexity in all living things. Every natural selection is for better anabolic / constructive, or catabolic / deconstructive processes.

    IF
    1.Catabolic and anabolic processes can sometimes evolve to other deconstructive and constructive processes,
    And IF
    2. Catabolic and anabolic processes can sometimes evolve separately,
    THEN
    The more selection pressure the more evolved the catabolic- deconstructive, and anabolic- constructive processes are. *

    *There may even been some evolution pressure within the species where a positive mutation on one side (catabolic or anabolic) puts positive pressure on the other side to match it such that there is a double improvement, or the 2nd side mitigates a negative mutation on the first.

    • musea Says:

      I think that if complexity is lost in one species, it may be often gained somewhere else.
      For example a species looses eyes in a cave, but the cave biome is expanded to include that species and the cave biome become more complex, a parasite loose complexity, but the host maintains it.
      A human cell gives up some complexity, but the human has more complexity collectively than the parmaecium.

      I think that overall complexity in all life is increasing as time goes forward and biomes expand – evolution leads to complexity in a biome, and in more new biomes, etc. Thus if something is lost in a specific species, overall it is sooner or later gained in the community. Thoughts.

  39. musea Says:

    This post is about my ongoing ideas of the evolution of anger and fear connected to my overall bio – hypothesis.

    Fear – too cold.
    Anger – too hot.

    Fear and anger are the two most basic emotions, or stress responses of living things, but how did they evolve?

    This post suggests that living things are very sensitive to temperature – a sustainable temperature allows for basic metabolic processes. Therefore sustaining an even temperature is an important part of survival.
    Now let’s use the example of humans.
    When the person gets too hot, he needs to cool down.
    When the person gets too cold, he needs to warm up.

    Fear and anger are either reflections of too cold and too hot OR
    they are the body’s signal to being too cold or too hot, OR
    they are somehow connected to being too cold or too hot.

    Fear = too cold. When the person is too cold he becomes fearful.
    Anger = too hot. When the person is too hot he becomes angry.

    Just a little temperature change makes a big difference.
    Somehow this temperature regulation is connected to the ENS, enteric nervous system.
    Somehow a temperature pattern based on a food in and waste out pattern is set up in childhood during weaning OR connected with breast feeing. It is an unconscious motivator of behavior, and because of its hidden nature, is very difficult to change.
    When the temperature pattern set up in childhood is too low, the adult will have repressed fear issues.
    When the temperature pattern set up in childhood is too high, the adult will have repressed anger issues.

    There are many ways to test this.

  40. musea Says:

    Fear/Anger as response to loss of control of body temperature.

    Why are overweight people so bossy, and so social oriented?
    Why are underweight people so anal, and so full of anxiety?
    What breast feeding pattern resolves these problems?
    Why are overweight people so angry when they can’t control others?
    Why do underweight people have panic attacks when they can’t control their own bodies and their situation.
    How can moderating body temperature down, end anger, and moderating body temperature up, end anxiety?
    Do underweight people try to over control themselves, to over compensate from weaning problems
    Do overweight people try to control others to get a substitute for weaning problems

    The major hidden, unconscious, inner human anxiety is fear of loosing control. This comes from the problems of breast feeding and weaning. When any person feels that he can’t control the situation – the biological basis of this is the feeling that he cannot control his body temperature – raising it higher when too low, lowering it when too high. The major part of this inner unconscious problem is connected to sleep and the Enteric Nervous System.

    Healthy personality, that had a healthy breast feeding and weaning infancy, has normal fear and anger, like all others, but these episodes don’t trigger problems of temperature regulation within self. There is no added unconscious triggered anxiety. This person can regulate body temperature UP when fearful, and DOWN when angry.

    Underweight personality – FEAR – loss of temperature control – too cold brings FEAR
    Loosing control of self brings on fear, panic attacks.
    Real biological trauma, not able to moderate temperature up during anxiety.

    Overweight personality – ANGER – loss of temperature control – too hot brings ANGER
    Loosing control of others brings on anger.
    Real biological trauma, not able to moderate body temperature down during anxiety.

    _____________
    *As of now I think this is the possible reason – not enough breast milk = overweight personality, oral personality, that’s always hungry. Too soon weaned and hard foods introduced that the child is not developed enough to digest = underweight personality, anal personality, that’s always too full and wants to block out and excrete out.

  41. musea Says:

    Why would their be a selection advantage for humans to have a food in/ waste out AND sleep AND temperature pattern set up after birth during the breast milk/weaning period?

    It would help to know when this evolutionary step happened. Did it occur with mammals? or just hominids? or just humans?

    i would think that it would be there already when hominids were evolving.

    Then why would that infant programmed behavior pattern be an advantage?

    I think it would be a way to respond to the environment that that child was born into. That gives him flexibility to respond after birth to the environment at hand.

    Overweight / Anger / Too Hot – not enough breast milk – compensates by always feeling hungry and unconsciously programmed from this childhood pattern to get more food.

    Underweight / Fear / Too Cold – switched to hard foods before the infant has developed enough to digest it – compensates by always feeling too full and unconsciously programmed from this childhood pattern to be particular about what food you take in, and be sure to excrete out excess.

    Note how these mimic sex drives of male and female.

    Overweight – always hungry.
    Male – drive to have as much sex as possible.

    Underweight – selective about food
    Female – drive to be selective about food.

  42. musea Says:

    Metabolism could have come first if the ‘maximum size of the cell’ problem (the ratio of surface area to volume) , could be solved by some reduction in the prebiotic parent cell’s size.

    This post suggests that before replication, cells had waste out processes that allowed the prebiotic parent cell to, like most bacteria, have a long existence that allowed it to perfect replication.

    Background:
    “Biosynthesis occurs not only during growth of an organism, when there is a net formation of new cellular material, but also in nongrowing, mature organisms. In the latter, the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids are constantly being synthesized and degraded in such a way that the rate of formation of the new molecules is exactly balanced by the rate of degradation of the old. Most of the molecular components of living cells exist in such a dynamic steady state.” Biogenergetics, Lehninger.

    Yet cells have a maximum size limit.

    “Why are most cells microscopic? … As the size of the cell increases… the ratio of surface area to volume decreases… The number of chemical exchanges that could be performed with the extracellular environment in a cell of this size would be inadequate to maintain the cell, because most of its cytoplasm is relatively far from the outer membrane. But dividing the large cell into many smaller cells, we can restore a surface-area-to-volume ratio that can serve each cell’s need for acquiring nutrients and expelling waste products. These geometric relationships explain why most cells are microscopic, and why larger organisms do not generally have larger cells than smaller organisms, but MORE cells..” Biology Campbell.

    ______________________________

    “Not selfish genes, but selfish father cells!

    Now let’s assume the environment has produced some prebiotic cells that have the ability to grow and expand. Or they grow and expand due to forces in the environment. When they grow too large they can grow no more. The best way to resole that problem is to dump waste when they get too large to function properly.
    Perhaps they dump waste by budding out parts of the cell and break them off, or to divide, or ???

    Those cells that could not dump part of the cell, would slow down all their growing processes and perhaps stop functioning altogether.

    Those that could excrete out part of the cell, would first reduce their size. Then they could start growing again. Then when they got too large a second time, they could excrete out part of the cell a second time, which would reduce their size, and then start growing to maximum size again. And repeat over and over. This would allow them to continue to function.

    Thus for those cells that could periodically excrete out part of the cell, they would have the advantage over other cells that could not, in that they could grow to as large as possible, then excrete out excess, then grow to as large as possible again, etc.

    Thus like many bacteria today, they would live almost immortal long lives as a pre cell. Note these primal cells have not replicated ever yet. Their only ability is to 1. grow large, and 2. excrete out waste till they were smaller, and 3. then repeat. ((Perhaps there is an environmental force that forces some type of division at a large size?)

    This gives these first father pre cells, long long lives. During their existence they would excrete out waste millions of time. During that long long process there would be many prebiotic daughter cells. With all that time one of those daughter cells would recreate the same processes that the father cell did. Thus at some point in the long time of waste out experimentation one daughter cell would have the ability to recreate what the father did, and we would have the first replicated daughter cell.

    Thus what started out as cell waste out, evolved into replication of new daughter cells.
    Virtually immortal father cells, would have all the time in the world to excrete out waste that sooner or later is a functioning daughter cell that can replicate its own daughter cells.

    We could say that this is not a selfish gene, but a selfish parent, and that replication was selected NOT for daughter cells at first, but for the further existence of prebiotic father cells. This is a case of selfish father cells, not selfish genes. We might even say this suggests an answer – the chicken came before the egg

    Therefore
    First came cell immortality.
    Then came cell division, and replication that produced daughter cells.

    This gives much time to perfect the replication process. Immortal father cells can excrete out waste, and re grow to maximum size again and again and again, then repeat. Each time a daughter cell can come closer an closer to having that ability too.

    By this process life would begin by stages.

    1. a growing pre cell.
    2. a growing pre cell that can excrete out waste when it reaches maximum size.
    3. a growing pre cell that can excrete out waste that replicates that ability and becomes the first true cell.

    Comments?

  43. musea Says:

    The daily cycle of food in and waste out that ties together all the following” wake and sleep, hunger and fear, hot and cold , overweight and underweight, social and self oriented.

    Food in – Day -Wake-Hunger-oral-hot-overweight – moves towards others for nurturing.

    Waste out-Night-Sleep-Fear- anal–cold-underweight – moves towards self to excrete out waste.

    FULL DAY CYCLE;

    DAY:Temperature rises through day – body temperature getting hotter – emotion of being hungry prompts body to eat – move towards food – continues through day – peaks at night before sleep.

    Overweight person – too hot, always hungry – oral personality – moves towards food, main emotion angry – subconscious weaning pattern of hungry for breast milk, set up in childhood in ENS, enteric nervous system.

    NIGHT: (two parts)
    Part one NREM sleep – 80% of sleep period.
    Temperature starts to lowers- body uses food taken in during the day to re nurture.

    Part two REM sleep – 20% of later sleep period.
    Temperature lowers through night sleep period – body temperature getting colder – emotion of fear prompts body to excrete out waste( mostly in REM sleep) – moves to excrete out waste – continues through night – peaks a few hours before waking.

    Underweight person – too cold, always full – can’t get waste out- anal personality, moves against waste within, main emotion fear – subconscious weaning pattern of ‘can’t get fid of waste the body can’t use’ set up in childhood in ENS .

  44. musea Says:

    Here are some collected related quotes and comments on my hypothesis:

    1. Catabolic and anabolic processes can evolve and expand to other deconstructive and constructive processes.
    2. Catabolic and anabolic processes can evolve and expand separately. Regulating each separately gives many evolutionary advantages.
    3. Separate constructive and deconstructive process may work as a symbiotic arms race” such that whenever a positive change happens on one side, it may spur the other to match it,; or, when a negative change happens on one side, it may spur the other to counteract the damage.
    ———————————-

    We can see not only that the degradative and biosynthetic pathways are not the simple reverse of each other but also that they differ with respect to their energetics… (not equal, and separate)

    There is one additional important feature of the dual pathways of degradation and biosynthesis: they are independently regulated in the cell… (independently regulated)

    Thus whenever the ATP and acetyl CoA concentrations in the cell exceed certain levels, the degradative pathway is inhibited and the biosynthetic pathway is stimulated… (separate, and work separately) – Bioenergetics, A.L. Lehninger.
    ———————————-

    I don’t see any reason they can’t evolve separately. I don’t see any
    need for non-random mutation or rapid change either.

    What you have to remember is that not every organism needs catabolic
    processes – a primitive autotroph, drawing energy from the sun or
    from chemical potentials, only needs anabolism. A primitive heterotroph, living off the molecules built by autotrophs, only needs catabolism.

    So anabolic pathways and catabolic pathways can evolve separately
    either in space or in time. Separately evolved autotrophic and
    heterotrophic organisms can for a symbiotic union forming an organism with both kinds of pathways. Or, an anabolic autotroph,
    wishing to expand its range toward the poles, might add some
    catabolism to its repertoire so that it can live on stored energy
    reserves over the winter. – Perplexed in Peoria
    ————————————

    Yes, but when the mutation occurs and
    in what gene it is is random–if it “corrects” the metabolic
    imbalance, then it will be selected for. – Anonymous

  45. musea Says:

    Shed the veneer of civilization and look at human species during most of our existence and you see strong circadian daily rhythms.

    Why not build up the body with nurturing during the most easy to build, part of the 24 hour day? Why not break down food during the easiest part of the 24 hour day to break down food? The species that best adapts to their daily two part environment will be selected for.

    Look at this chart:

    CHART – Daily biological chart
    http://tinyurl.com/4b7mxuu

    My suggestion is that there is an overall CATABOLIC /ANABOLIC daily cycle.
    Or to put it more exactly a CATABOLIC AND DECONSTRUCTIVE CYCLE followed by an ANABOLIC AND CONSTRUCTIVE CYCLE.

    Wake = catabolic, deconstructive phase of rising temperature. Day
    Sleep = anabolic, constructive phase of lowering temperature. Night

    Day: When awake we eat, and break down food for energy. Body temperature is low when we wake, and continues rising till the sun goes down. Catabolic / Deconstructive phase.

    Night” When we go to sleep, we first stop eating, stop bringing in more food, and then begin processing the food, and using it to grow and replenish the body. Body temperature drops throughout the night – sleeping phase continues till about two hours before waking. Then the body prepares waste out – we awake, excrete out waste, and temperature begins to increase again for a new daily cycle.

    Further I suggest that there is a weaning/ breast feeding pattern set up in childhood. If the infant has enough breast milk for enough time, he will have a normal daily temperature cycle and no repressed trauma connected to weaning.

    When there is not enough breast feeding, the child will have a compensation temperature pattern –
    overweight has a too high temperature . This is connected to repressed anger issues..
    underweight has a too low temperature. This is connected to repressed fear issues.
    When this repressed infant trauma is triggered, we have major health and psychological problems. Resolve repressed trauma and we end the problems.

    Now go back to the chart. I suggest that there are two main problem areas that are triggered daily.
    1. When the body temperature shifts from rising, to falling – when night begins – 7 PM.
    2. When the body temperature shifts from falling, to rising, near dawn and wake up – 4:30 AM.

    For those overweight – I suggest anger issues will be at their worst in late evening when body temperatures reach their highest., switch, and begin to lower.
    (Anger issues, hunger issues, addiction issues, etc.)

    For those underweight – I suggest fear issues will be at their worst in early morning before waking, when body temperatures reach their lowest, switch, and begin to rise.
    (Fear issues, nightmares, panic attacks etc.)

    Here is another chart that shows this daily cycle for blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature.

    CHART daily, blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature cycles.
    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html

    Clearly humans have adapted to the environment’s day/night cycle.
    This suggests why we sleep – it is for anabolic, constructive processes,
    This suggests why some are overweight with that set of repressed anger problems. while others are underweight with that set of repressed fear problems
    This suggests that catabolic/anabolic processes are key our understanding of life.

    Tom Hendricks
    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)

  46. musea Says:

    Here is a key puzzle piece I was looking for – blood pressure.

    The one single thing that would set up the patterns I’ve suggested during weaning would be the blood pressure pattern. That would lead to all the health problems, that I suggested, for those without a healthy breast feeding pattern. Then I wondered if there was any study to test if breast milk would affect blood pressure. Sure enough, it does.
    This suggests some new developments in my hypothesis:

    Breast feeding sets up, and or adjusts the blood pressure pattern.

    Too low blood pressure- underweight * problems in later life.
    Too high blood pressure – overweight ** problems in later life

    Breast milk lowers blood pressure,
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4572185.stm

    CHART: daily, blood pressure, (and heart rate, body temperature) cycle.
    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html

    __________________________

    *Underweight person – too cold, always full – can’t get waste out- anal personality, moves against waste within, main emotion fear – subconscious weaning pattern of ‘can’t get rid of waste the body can’t use’ set up in childhood in ENS, enteric nervous system . (Fear issues, nightmares, panic attacks etc.)

    **Overweight person – too hot, always hungry – oral personality – moves towards food, main emotion angry – subconscious weaning pattern of hungry for breast milk, set up in childhood in ENS. (Anger issues, hunger issues, addiction issues, etc.)

    Tom Hendricks
    (editor of the 18 year old zine Musea)

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)

  47. musea Says:

    Let’s add this:

    CHART: daily blood pressure cycle, (and heart rate, body temperature)
    cycle.
    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html

    Note on this chart that day – awake, is about raising blood pressure
    to help take in food, and night – sleep is about lowering blood
    pressure to use that food and get waste out.

    That is a clue to why there is sometimes an unhealthy pattern, set up
    in childhood, of too low or too high blood pressure with all the
    problems connected to each response.

    When the infant is underfed and does not get enough breast milk and
    nurturing he needs – his body raises his blood pressure to accent the
    day/food in phase. Note the charts – this is when blood pressure is
    highest.

    When the infant is weaned too soon, and now gets solids his digestion
    system is not yet developed enough to process – his body lowers his
    blood pressure to accent the night/sleep/waste out phase. Note the
    charts – this is when blood pressure is lowest.

    Thus the infant’s blood pressure reacts to the weaning problem with a
    pattern of either too high or too low blood pressure. This pattern
    seems to stick in the ENS (Enteric Nervous System or gut brain) and is
    almost impossible to change as an adult – so far.

  48. musea Says:

    More and more it seems to me that we are creatures of 2 brains.
    The head brain, and the gut, or digestion, or ENS (Enteric Nervous System) brain.

    We have a two brain system.

    Head brain – stresses consciousness and waking activity.

    We being social creatures find this brain to be vital to our survival because it involves all activity with others. We consciously think this is our main brain, because it is so important to every aspect of our waking interacting lives. We seldom even consider the digestion brain or sleeping brain as important – sleep is more a necessary nuisance to us. And digestion isn’t an issue until something goes wrong and we get sick. Yet I think the digestion brain is the more basic and the more ancient of the two brains. And now in many ways I find it as equally important, if not more important to our well being.

    ENS or digestion brain – stresses the unconscious and sleeping activity.

    —————————————
    This is speculation of course, but I’m going to suggest a comparison of the two brains. If correct you will see that we are very much creatures of two brains and that though these two brain systems work together, they are very much separate also. And that the ENS, not only rules our inner body digestion and waste out activity; but is a major force of every aspect of our lives. And it may hold the key to many major chronic health and psychological problems that up till now could not be resolved.

    1.
    HEAD BRAIN : conscious, waking brain. This is the brain that gets and takes in food. The head brain concerns everything outside of our bodies. This is the brain for eating, sex, child care, and everything outside of our bodies. For social creatures all of these things are vital. More and more I tend to think of consciousness as necessary for this awareness of what’s outside our bodies. Whereas that same consciousness is NOT necessary to digestion and to use the food within our bodies, or to build or rebuild our bodies, or to get waste out of our bodies. Thus creatures have evolved consciousness to better deal with the world outside of themselves.

    ENS: unconscious, sleeping brain. This is the brain that does these main things, 1. It stops eating, it begins to process the food, it uses the food to build and refresh the body, and it prepares waste out. Consciousness does not seem to be necessary for any part of this process.

    2.
    HEAD BRAIN; used to monitor activity outside the body. The social brain.
    ENS: used to monitor activity inside the body. The self brain.

    3.
    HEAD BRAIN: Eating, Sex, Child Care, social interaction.
    ENS: self nurturing, and getting waste out

    4.
    HEAD BRAIN: Developed senses around mouth: taste, smell, sight, hearing, etc.
    to better monitor outside the body and take good food in, etc.
    ENS: Digestion system (and perhaps part of the circulation system).

    5.
    HEAD BRAIN: Waking hours. Consciousness*
    ENS Sleeping hours. Unconsciousness or Subconsciousness

    6.
    HEAD BRAIN; Higher blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature
    ENS: Lower blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature.
    See these three charts:
    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html

    7.
    HEAD BRAIN: learns through thinking
    ENS: learns through repetition.

    8.
    HEAD BRAIN: more catabolic
    ENS: more anabolic

    ———————————————————-

    *One of the great advantages to consciousness may be that problems that we are aware of in our conscious head minds, can be more easily addressed and resolved. Problems of the ENS are hidden or unconscious. They are inner conflicts that, until now, we didn’t have a way to bring to our conscious minds and resolve. Finding a way to do that may resolve the hidden conflicts in the ENS brain.

    Tom Hendricks
    (editor of the 18 year old zine Musea)

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)

  49. musea Says:

    Two stages for the newborn:

    My suggestion is that there seems to be two stages that a newborn goes through after birth. The first is learning how to take in nurturing. This develops the body’s digestion system for taking food in. The second is learning how to excrete waste out. The second develops the body’s digestion system that excretes waste out.

    1. The first stage is taking nurturing in. The newborn, after birth moves toward breast milk for nurturing. The most vital thing now for the infant is taking breast milk in. This seems to be a stage where the child develops that part of his digestion system that deals with taking in nurturing. Excreting out waste is not a priority yet, because breast milk is almost the perfect food. This stage seems to last for at least 6 months or more until the child is weaned.

    2.. Now the child is advanced enough for the second stage. The second stage is excreting waste out. The newborn is teething, weaning off breast milk, and goes through a stage of separation anxiety. These all seem be clues that suggest a stage where the child develops that part of his digestion system that deals with excreting out waste – separation from waste, and/or separation from breast milk – trauma. This stage seems to begin after the first stage, and when weaning begins.

    Thus we see that the body’s digestion system builds itself, not all at once, but in stages such that the first concentrates more on taking in and using nurturing. Then when that is safely developed enough, the second stage begins where the digestion system develops waste out processes to deal with waste.

    My suggestion is that these two stages set the food in and waste out processes for the child for the rest of his life, that they are unconscious behavior, that they are somehow connected to the digestion system and the ENS, that this remains a driving force, and that most of it is connected to sleep.

    Finally, problems in either one of these stages suggests specific, chronic, physical, and psychological problems such that

    1. Stage one nurturing problems. No breast milk at all – sets up nurturing in problems and the overweight pattern.
    2. Stage two waste out problems. Weaning too soon – sets up waste out problems and the underweight pattern.

    See Breast Feeding Phase and See Weaning Phase.

  50. musea Says:

    WEANING PHASE (Second of two phases) The Underweight pattern.

    The second phase of two infant developmental phases, is the waste out phase, or weaning phase.

    This post is about the second phase of infancy where the child is weaned from breast milk. IF there is a problem, then there is the underweight /fearful/ anal/ subconscious/ digestion pattern , one of two main breast feeding trauma patterns.*

    I’ve suggested that there may be two main unconscious problems connected with breast feeding that may be best summed up as the overweight pattern and the underweight. pattern Both of these seem to involve the ENS, Enteric Nervous System or digestion brain, or gut brain. Both come from a breast feeding or weaning problem. And both are unresolved sleep traumas. The infant starts with a breast feeding phase where he sets up his taking-food-in pattern. Then 6 months or more later, he starts with the 2nd phase, where he sets up his waste-out-pattern; with weaning, teething, separation anxiety etc.

    This talks about the underweight problems and their possible connections to infant development.

    Unlike the overweight pattern child that was denied breast milk and always fed formula, the underweight infant is breast fed. From 6 months – 18 months the child begins teething, (biological way to prepare for solid foods). This is a time he also ends breast feeding. Soon after, infants go through a phase called separation anxiety where the infant has trauma when separated from his mother.

    I suggest that this separation anxiety comes from loosing breast milk feeding and the mother-child bond connected with breast feeding . The phase seems to follow the ending of breast feeding. The phase is also a normal part of any child’s development if done late enough for the child to handle. But if it is done too soon then I suggest it becomes a hidden trauma – the underweight pattern trauma .**

    I suggest separation anxiety of the breast fed child can become an adult trauma.
    And because it is a digestion trauma, I suggest it is a trauma in the ENS.
    And because it is so early in the infants development, I suggest it is an unconscious trauma that may affect the child into adulthood until it is resolved. The ENS also seems to do the most ‘digesting’ during sleep, so I suggest the trauma in one connected to sleep. Waking events may trigger the problem, but they don’t cause it.

    The adult with the underweight pattern has these characteristics.

    Fear. Childhood fear of being separated from his mother – separation anxiety, then turns to fear of being separated from those he loves, or those things he loves. The person has a hidden fear of loosing those close to him, or of things he treasures. There is a sense of once having it, then loosing it – that reflects once having breast milk, then loosing it too soon in his development. There is also a fear of strangers and new experiences.

    This fear may manifest itself in these unconscious or subconscious ways.
    Overall : fear of taking in food, fear of letting go of waste. This is the underweight anal personality.

    Fear of taking in food – it might be undigestible.
    Fear of separation from body waste – there is a desire to hold on to what the person has now, to compensate for loosing the breast milk the child still needed in infancy.
    Fear in sleep, nightmares, night terrors, etc. Fear of going to sleep. Fear of waking up.
    Fear of eating and fear of food from loss of breast milk and the substitution of less nurturing food.
    Desire for sweets – that are breast milk substitutes, and can be quickly and easily digested as opposed to fibers and protein.
    Overall lower temperature, and blood pressure. Perhaps because of processing less food.
    Anxiety attacks – fear of loosing what you have, fear of being forced outside of what you know. OCD.
    Fear of strangers – a common aspect of infant separation anxiety.
    Underweight.
    Fear during puberty, when many of these fears are triggered from changes in the body. Fear of sex.
    Phobias of any kind.

    What needs to be resolved: Unconscious separation anxiety in ENS and sleep. Then the adult needs to feel he can safely separate from his mother. Then he can resolve the sleep problems in both NREM and REM sleep – let go of waste in REM sleep, and replace it with the necessary food in, in NREM sleep.

    NOTES: and comments
    * The other is the overweight/angry/oral subconscious digestion pattern trauma
    **This suggests a test for this part of the hypothesis. Breast fed children should have a greater separation anxiety than those that were bottle fed.
    *** painful teething may also set up an unconscious fear of dentists.
    **** note that both the overweight and underweight patterns seem to come from not enough breast milk in. Why would they not be connected to too much food coming in?
    My suggestion is that for the millions of years of human development, there was, for the most part, a lack of food, not an abundance of it. That would suggest that a pattern of digestion determined after birth, would better adapt the child to that environment.
    ***** Breast feeding is the only biological necessary human interaction. As such it plays a vital part in our well being. Not having any breast milk leads to the ‘always hungry, overweight personality. Being too soon weaned leads to the separation anxiety underweight personality.

  51. musea Says:

    BREAST FEEDING PHASE (First of two phases)

    The first of two infant developmental phases, is the nurturing in phase, or breast feeding phase.

    This post is about the first phase of infancy, where the child, is breast fed after birth and until he is weaned .
    IF there is a problem, then there is an overweight, angry/oral/sucbconsicous digestion pattern, one of two main breast feeding trauma patterns.

    I’ve suggested that there may be two main unconscious problems connected with breast feeding that may be best summed up as the overweight pattern and the underweight. pattern Both of these seem to involve the ENS, Enteric Nervous System or digestion brain, or gut brain. Both come from a breast feeding or weaning problem. And both are unresolved sleep traumas. The infant starts with a breast feeding phase where he sets up his taking-food-in pattern. Then 6 months or more later, he starts with the 2nd phase, where he sets up his waste-out-pattern; with weaning, teething, separation anxiety etc.

    When the child is not breast fed from his biological mother, then this sets up an unresolved, subconscious, chronic, hunger that leads to the overweight pattern.

    The child is always hungry. Moves toward food. Moves toward others, and is very social. Oral personality. May have low self esteem and anger issues from not getting the breast milk he needed.

    The possible scenarios for this are somewhat rare. That suggests that in the millions of years of human existence, overweight should be somewhat rare. And excluding recent developments, it seems to be somewhat rare.

    1. The mother dies, and the child is breast fed from another mother.
    2. The child is fed on another type of milk – example cow’s milk or goat’s milk.
    3. The child is fed a formula, a recent development that seems to play the main role in recent obesity.

    The suggestion is that all these would lead to the subconscious overweight pattern in the child.

  52. musea Says:

    Note: another major part of this weaning phase is that it spurs language development.
    With separation anxiety comes the desire to communicate with the mother.
    Sure enough language in children starts during this weaning phase.
    http://www.childdevelopmentinfo.com/development/language_development.shtml

  53. musea Says:

    The Two Traumas 1. Breast Feeding Pattern. 2. Weaning Pattern.*
    (This is the latest in an ongoing, and developing hypothesis).
    _______________________________________________________
    1.
    Description: Overweight, oral, angry, bossy at others, social:

    BREAST MILK TRAUMA. Was denied all breast milk. Needed to take in much more to get the needed nurturing.

    Problem to solve: Needs to be able to have enough nurturing coming in, so he can block out bad food.

    Moves towards others to get nurturing. High Blood Pressure (eats more). Addictive personality. Can’t block out bad food (had to take in a lot of it, to get the needed nurturing that breast feeding would have given). Hard to separate from others. Separation from mother phase is poorly developed

    Problems: obesity, addictions, colds and allergies (can’t block out bad first food), angry at bad food, but needs it for the little nurturing he got. Low opinion of self – never nurtured.

    ANGER. Angry at bad food coming in. Angry at not blocking out bad food. Repressed anger.

    Trauma in first phase of infancy, when food-in pattern established. Birth to 6-8 months when other breast fed infants are weaned and waste out pattern begins.

    Desire – good food coming in and bad food blocked out – which was denied in infancy.

    1. Moves towards nurturing, moves towards others
    Moves towards others to get the nurturing he was denied.

    2. Moves against bad nurturing, moves against non nurturing others – trauma
    Not able to move against bad food, because that’s the only nurturing he’s had.

    __________________________________________________________
    2.
    Description Underweight, anal, fearful, bossy at self, introspective.

    WEANING TRAUMA: Received breast milk, but was weaned too soon. Tries to hold in more to compensate for what he had but now has lost.

    Problem to solve:Needs to have enough nurturing so he can excrete out waste without fear. Weaning too soon causes waste out problems.

    Moves towards self to hold nurturing – but holds in too much waste too. Blocks out food for fear it’s indigestible like the solids he got too soon in his development. Low Blood Pressure (eats less). Anal Personality, with phobias, panic attacks. Can’t excrete out bad waste (had to hold it in to nurture self, when breast milk was stopped too soon). Hard to separate from waste in self. Separation anxiety.

    Problems, underweight, phobias, infections, waste out problems, separation anxiety, Low opinion of others who took away his nurturing too soon.

    FEAR. Fear of not excreting out waste. Repressed fear.
    Trauma in second phase of infancy, when weaning pattern established. 6-8 months and beyond.

    Desire – good food staying in, and bad food excreted out. Denied in infancy.

    3. Moves towards nurturing from self, moves towards self
    Moves towards self to get the nurturing he had, but then lost.

    4. Moves to excrete out waste – moves to separate from others – trauma
    Not able to move against waste, because he is afraid of loosing what little remained.
    __________________________________________________________________

    Traumatic events in our lives cause anger and fear in all of us. Yet they become much worse if they trigger these subconscious and unconsciously motivating infant traumas. Some handle stress better than others. That seems to be why. These traumatic events don’t start the trauma, instead they amplify it. Once, both the original breast feeding pattern and the weaning pattern is resolved to a healthy state, then the person should resolve other traumatic events that happened in his life. One to be sure to consider is the changes during puberty. Another is any traumatic loss or violent episode, or any situation that caused great anger and fear.

    *Readers can check their own situation by first determining if they are
    ‘overweight, angry, oral’ or ‘underweight, fearful, anal’. Then read the descriptions and see if they fit your own breast feeding pattern.

    Note these unconscious problems are probably in the ENS, enteric nervous system, that deals with digestion. And they are mostly sleep issues. That is when food is processed in NREM, and waste out is processed in REM..

  54. musea Says:

    There is a telling remark in this video of the benefits of breast
    feeding

    that supports much of what I’ve said.

    The woman said that ‘breast fed babies often wake earlier
    because breast milk is more easy to digest.
    That simple fact suggests.

    Sleep is digestion.
    Breast milk sets up a digestion pattern of food in.
    Breast milk set ups the best digestion pattern of food in.

  55. musea Says:

    Where in the body does the food in / waste out pattern form?

    The digestion system starts with breaking down food. This continues in the stomach. The small intestine is where the food is absorbed for use, then the waste is excreted out. The entire digestion system seems to be mostly under the control of the ENS (enteric nervous system) or gut brain.

    I suggest that after birth a pattern of food in (connected to breast feeding) is set up. Then 6 or more months later, a waste out pattern is set up (connected to weaning)

    My suggestion is this:
    The food in pattern begins in the small intestines where digested food is absorb and used by the body. This begins at birth and develops through the breast feeding pattern. There is little waste out here because breast milk is so nutritional.

    The waste out pattern begins after breast feeding ends and weaning begins. It begins when solids that are not absorbed, are excreted out as body waste.

    My suggestion is that we sleep to utilize the food we take in during waking hours.
    There are two types of sleep, NREM, not REM sleep or slow wave sleep, and REM or rapid eye movement sleep.

    NREM sleep is when we take in or absorb nurturing. Then in REM the waste is pushed along and prepared for morning evacuation. That is why NREM comes first, and why REM is second. That’s why there is more NREM sleep , about 80%, and less REM sleep about 20%. That’s why they alternate. First in NREM we absorb, then in REM we send the rest further along the alimentary canal. Then repeat through the night.

    This pattern of first food in, then waste out is healthy when:
    FIRST the child is breast fed by it’s biological mother for more than 6 months. This sets up the infants food-in pattern or nurturing pattern, for the rest of his life with easy to digest breast milk.
    Then SECOND the child is weaned and begins to eat solids. By introducing food other than breast milk it develops the child’s waste out pattern. His body learns how to excrete out waste. It also helps separate the child from his mother (separation anxiety = weaning anxiety) which is a positive phase of development.

    But when either of these go wrong then you have problems

    Nurturing in problems – lead to overweight pattern.: The child is not fed breast milk from his biological mother. He develops a pattern of absorbing too much in his intestines to compensate for the lack of nutritional breast milk – and becomes overweight. AND because he is never breast fed, he doesn’t go through the weaning phase, and has problems of not enough separation. He is angry about being hungry
    Not enough breast milk in, in infancy – nurturing phase. This unconscious pattern programs him for the rest of his life.

    Waste out problems lead to underweight problems. The child is breast fed milk from his biological mother so his food in pattern is normal, but he is weaned too soon and fed solids he can’t yet digest.
    He develops a waste out trauma, and from then on fears being full with waste he can’t excrete out and excretes out too much waste in REM sleep to compensate. . He has weaning problems of too much waste out, too much separation and too much separation anxiety. He is fearful of being too full.
    Not enough waste out in infancy weaning phase. This unconscious pattern programs him for the rest of his life.

  56. musea Says:

    Small Intestine may be the most important entry point to the body.

    We are conditioned to think of our mouths as the entry point for nurturing. But from a biological point of view it may be more correct to say the small intestine is. That change in focus may be a key to understanding many aspects of human health and well being.

    We take in nurturing in the mouth and up to the small intestine it is mostly broken down. It is in the small intestine that the nurturing is absorbed. The alimentary canal is, strangely enough, mostly separate from the rest of the body, except at the small intestine. That’s why I think it is there that according to our digestion system, we take in food.

    I suggest that there too is where the pattern of food in and waste out. is set up in childhood – food in during breast feeding, waste out – during weaning.
    Then too this may be mostly in NREM sleep – the time after we have stopped eating. Note that most food seems to take a day to digest completely. The diet that humans have had over most of our existence, was probably less food filled with more fiber, and more vegetables and fruits. It would be more quickly digested than today’s diet. That suggests a daily cycle.

    The small intestines has these two options:
    take in too much nurturing / block out too little
    take in too little nurturing / block out too much

    So now I see the small intestine as the place where nurturing is taken in (too much or too little) and bad food – food the body doesn’t want – is blocked out. This is the pattern set up in childhood. It’s really fascinating change of ideas on what is important to health. – thoughts?

  57. musea Says:

    Some ideas:

    Sleep debt is the sleep lost on one night, and gained on another to correct the problem.

    I suggest the reason for a sleep debt is this. Sleep is the time when digested food is used to build up the body. Then the waste is prepared for excretion.
    If there is not enough sleep for one night – the food digested that day is not fully processed. Extra sleep on the next night will catch up on the necessary digestion of both days.

    ————————
    Sweet tooth. I suggest we have a sweet tooth, or love for sweets because they are so easily digested. If protein was more easy to digest than sugar, we would have a ‘meat’ tooth.

    ————————-
    Daily two part cycle of digestion. (Cave man diet probably a 24 hour or one day digestion cycle.

    Day, wake, conscious, catabolic / deconstructive phase – take food in and break it down from mouth to small intestine.

    Night, sleep, unconscious, anabolic / constructive phase – absorb nutrients, build and repair body, and prepare waste out. – from small intestine through evacuation through alimentary canal.

    Like all my posts, these are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  58. musea Says:

    First this – there are many adjustments to my hypothesis here that in some ways suggest new ideas, and in many ways suggest past ideas were NOT correct. Hopefully these are more and more correct. Reading different studies suggest tough questions that need to be answered. That, in turn leads to new developments.
    __________________________

    Digestion system has 3 main parts. I suggest that in infancy each part is set up either during the first infant phase, the breast feeding phase, or the 2nd phase the weaning phase.

    Digestion system has 3 main parts. The alimentary tract has 3 distinct parts.
    Generally speaking:

    a. Breaking down food. Food is broken down mostly from mouth to stomach.
    b. Absorbing digested nutrients. Nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine.
    c. Excreting waste out. Waste with nutrients removed, passes through large intestine and then is excreted out.

    Breast feeding and weaning set up patterns in these three vital digestion parts.
    Breast feeding usually lasts anywhere from 6 months and up. Weaning pattern follows.

    1. Breast fed infants absorb breast milk in small intestine. There is little need to break down breast milk yet, and little waste to excrete out yet. So those two of the three parts of the digestion system are not needed that much yet.
    This first phase sets up a NUTRIENTS TAKEN IN pattern.

    2. Weaning off breast milk. The child eats his first solids and liquids that are not breast milk. This requires two new patterns:
    Breaking down the new foods before they reach the small intestine. Unlike breast milk these first foods require breaking down into usable nutrients.
    Excreting out the waste after nutrients are absorbed in small intestine. For the first time the infant has to excrete out assorted wastes that are not solely from breast milk.
    This 2nd phase sets up a BREAK DOWN food pattern and a WASTE OUT pattern.

    Now the child has developed all three parts of the digestion system.
    a. Takes food in, attacks it, breaks it down and digests it. (Weaning phase)
    b. Nutrients are absorbed (Breast feeding phase)
    c. Waste is excreted out. (Weaning phase).

    Now the child has developed a FOOD IN / WASTE OUT system.

    This food in and waste out, three pattern, digestion system is set up in the ENS, Enteric Nervous System, or gut brain. These patterns are extremely hard to alter once they are set up. They subconsciously drive our behavior. Because they deal with the basic food in and waste out metabolic processes that are so vital to every aspect of our lives, these subconscious patterns are the key to our health and behavior.

    IF there is a trauma in any one of the three, there will be a specific, recognizable, distinct pattern of stress, neurosis, and health problems. Much more to follow.

    ————————————–
    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  59. musea Says:

    The importance of weaning to an infants health

    First, breast feeding teaches a child how to take in needed nutrients.
    Then weaning teaches the child how to take in other foods that require two new aspects of digestion.
    a. breaking down the new foods into nutrients.
    b. excreting out the unusable waste.

    The infant is weaned sometime after 6 months of breast feeding.

    I contend that there are many many necessary parts to this phase of infant development. A healthy weaning supports all these things and or correlates with these developments. Note how important these developments are to the healthy independence of the child and his separation from his mother.

    Separation anxiety
    Fear of strangers
    Beginning of language
    Beginning of crawling, and later walking
    Teething
    Development of digestion of solids
    Development of waste out processes.
    First nightmares,
    Language development

    Weaning seems to spur development in a child to reconnect with his mother (talk to her, crawl back, etc.) and then to move on to learning the value of separation from mother and parents.

    The trauma of loosing a mother’s breast milk, seems to be a way to better protect and build the infant. We talk of the importance of breast feeding which are many. But weaning also has many important and positive aspects.

    —————————–
    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  60. musea Says:

    Digestion system has 3 main parts. The alimentary tract has 3 distinct parts.
    Generally speaking:

    a. Breaking down food. Food is broken down mostly from mouth to stomach.
    b. Absorbing digested nutrients. Nutrients are absorbed in the small intestine.
    c. Excreting waste out. Waste with nutrients removed, passes through large intestine and then is excreted out.

    This post suggests that in infancy each of those three parts are set up either in the breast feeding phase or the weaning phase,
    AND that they are set up in the ENS, Enteric Nervous System,
    AND that each one is a key, vital aspect to every aspect of the health and well being of a person
    AND that a well developed child will use all 3 to resolve food, health problems or problems of any kind, that he may face in his life.
    AND that the trauma in any one of the 3, causes clear, distinct , specific, reactions; responses, emotions, and health problems. This long post looks at each of those three phases individually.*

    BREAK DOWN FOOD
    ————————————————
    GOAL IN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM – Food in OR Waste out
    Food in -Take in, eat, and break down food to its usable components.
    BODY RESPONSE
    Moves against undigested food.
    WHAT PART OF ALIMENTARY TRACT
    From eating, esophagus, and stomach, up to small intestines.
    BREAST FEEDING OR WEANING PHASE
    Set up during weaning phase when foods other than breast milk are introduced.
    MOVES TOWARD OR AWAY FROM MOTHER
    Coincides with weaning, separation anxiety, and first independence from mother. Moves against mother due to excess food.
    WAKING OR SLEEPING
    Food eaten and broken down mostly during waking hours.
    MAJOR TRAUMA
    Too much food to process. Over fed, over nurtured.
    WEIGHT PROBLEM
    Overweight ? Takes in too much food may lead to a pattern of over eating.
    MAJOR EVOLVED EMOTION WITH TRAUMA
    Anger. Anger at excess.
    HOW REACT TO OTHERS
    Moves against others.
    WHICH OF 3 NEUROTIC PERSONALITY (K. Horney)
    Moves against others (Wikipedia)
    Aggression … the “aggression” category, also called the “moving against people”, or the “expansive” solution. Neurotic children or adults within this category often exhibit anger or basic hostility to those around them. That is, there is a need for power, a need for control and exploitation, and a maintenance of a facade of omnipotence. Manipulative qualities aside, under Horney’s assertions the aggressive individual may also wish for social recognition, not necessarily in terms of limelight, but in terms of simply being known (perhaps feared) by subordinates and peers alike. In addition, the individual has needs for a degree of personal admiration by those within this person’s social circle and, lastly, for raw personal achievement. These characteristics comprise the “aggressive” neurotic type. Aggressive types also tend to keep people away from them. On the other hand, they only care about their wants and needs. They would do whatever they can to be happy and wouldn’t desist from hurting anyone.
    MALE OR FEMALE
    Traditional male behavior , violent, aggressive behavior.
    FIGHT, FLIGHT, TEND AND BEFRIEND
    Fight reaction to stress, move against
    POSITIVE BEHAVIOR (often used to defend neurotic behavior)
    Defender, protector of group.
    OVERALL PERSONALITY
    ?
    CATABOLIC OR ANABOLIC
    Catabolic, deconstructive – break down food.
    FOUR OPTIONS
    #2

    ABSORBING DIGESTED NUTRIENTS
    ————————————————
    GOAL IN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM – Food in OR Waste out
    Food in – Absorb digested nutrients. Nourish replenish, repair, growth. Nutrients in.
    BODY RESPONSE
    Moves towards digested nutrients
    WHAT PART OF ALIMENTARY TRACT
    Small intestines
    BREAST FEEDING OR WEANING PHASE
    Set up during breast feeding phase
    MOVES TOWARD OR AWAY FROM MOTHER
    Moves towards mother for nourishment. Moves towards nurturing.
    WAKING OR SLEEPING
    Sleeping (NREM?)
    MAJOR TRAUMA
    Not enough nutrients to take in. Always hungry.
    WEIGHT PROBLEM
    Overweight. Will always be hungry – addictive personality.
    MAJOR EVOLVED EMOTION WITH TRAUMA
    Love – love for the needed nurturing and love those who can give it.
    Also dependency problems. Dependent on others to get love.
    HOW REACT TO OTHERS
    Moves towards others
    WHICH OF 3 NEUROTIC PERSONALITY (K. Horney)
    Moves towards others: (Wikipedia)
    This category is seen as a process of “moving towards people”, or self-effacement. Under Horney’s theory children facing difficulties with parents often use this strategy. Fear of helplessness and abandonment occurs—phenomena Horney refers to as “basic anxiety”. Those within the compliance category tend to exhibit a need for affection and approval on the part of their peers. They may also seek out a partner, somebody to confide in, fostering the belief that, in turn, all of life’s problems would be solved by the new cohort. A lack of demands and a desire for inconspicuousness both occur in these individuals.
    MALE OR FEMALE
    Traditional Female behavior (dependency, excess mothering)
    FIGHT, FLIGHT, TEND AND BEFRIEND
    Tend and befriend reaction to stress.
    POSITIVE BEHAVIOR (often used to defend neurotic behavior)
    Nurturer, supporter of group.
    OVERALL PERSONALITY
    Oral
    CATABOLIC OR ANABOLIC
    Anabolic, constructive – take in and use nutrients
    FOUR OPTIONS
    #1 and #3

    EXCRETING OUT WASTE
    ————————————————
    GOAL IN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM – Food in OR Waste out
    Waste out – Excrete waste out.
    BODY RESPONSE
    Moves against waste to excrete out, or separates from waste
    WHAT PART OF ALIMENTARY TRACT
    Large Intestine
    BREAST FEEDING OR WEANING PHASE
    Weaning phase. Set up phase when foods other than breast milk are introduced and they produce wastes..
    MOVES TOWARD OR AWAY FROM MOTHER
    Separates from mother, separation anxiety, fear of strangers.
    WAKING OR SLEEPING
    Sleeping (REM?)
    MAJOR TRAUMA
    Not enough waste out, undigested waste, can’t block out waste, can’t excrete out waste
    WEIGHT PROBLEM
    Underweight. Fear of food, fear of taking in food.
    MAJOR EVOLVED EMOTION WITH TRAUMA
    Fear
    HOW REACT TO OTHERS
    Move away from, separate from
    WHICH OF 3 NEUROTIC PERSONALITY (K. Horney)
    Detachment, also called the “moving-away-from” or “resigning” solution or a detached personality. As neither aggression nor compliance solve parental indifference, Horney recognized that children might simply try to become self sufficient. The withdrawing neurotic may disregard others in a non-aggressive manner, regarding solitude and independence as the way forth. The stringent needs for perfection comprise another part of this category; those withdrawing may strive for perfection above all else, to the point where being flawed is utterly unacceptable. Everything the “detached” type does must be unassailable and refined. They suppress or deny all feelings towards others, particularly love and hate.
    MALE OR FEMALE
    Traditional Male (lack of commitment)
    FIGHT, FLIGHT, TEND AND BEFRIEND
    Flight, separate from.
    POSITIVE BEHAVIOR (often used to defend neurotic behavior)
    Rebel, critic, helps to improve group.
    OVERALL PERSONALITY
    Anal
    CATABOLIC OR ANABOLIC
    Catabolic, deconstrucitve, excretes out waste
    FOUR OPTIONS
    #4

    *Reader, unless you are very healthy indeed, one of these 3 personalities should fit you and suggest unconscious problems, where they came from, and how to resolve them. Note too that if that is the case, you will have a strong RESISTANCE to dealing with this subconscious trauma. ” Over time, “resistance” came to mean anything a patient did to make therapy or a particular intervention less effective. Resistance has also been defined as the act of defending one’s position in response to confrontation.” – Wikipedia.
    When trauma happens to us from events outside us they may trigger these inner problems and make them more stressful and harmful, but they don’t cause them. They seem to be mostly caused by the patterns set up in the digestion system in early childhood.

    —————————–
    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  61. musea Says:

    Selection Pressure.

    This post suggests that species react to selection pressure with one of these
    three responses or strategies:

    Move against
    Move toward
    Move away from

    Move against – the predator of predator and prey. The species attacks to resolve the selection pressure

    Move toward – symbiosis. The species joins with other species to resolve the selection pressure.

    Move away from – the species finds a separate niche to resolve the selection pressure

    Can anyone think of some response outside of these?

    ————————————–
    Note that these three responses are the same as the 3 phases of digestion.
    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  62. musea Says:

    Question about my hypothesis.
    Sure is a relationship between the two, catabolic and anabolic.
    The metabolism of living things is either catabolic or anabolic. There really is nothing else. So my suggestion was that just about every aspect of any living thing must have evolved from one or the other.
    The ones that evolve from anabolism – I define as constructive.
    The ones that evolve from catabolism – I define as destructive.
    These posts and my hypothesis are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Two things are important if this hypothesis is valid. 1. that catabolic and anabolic can evolve to other forms while the original catabolic and anabolic chemistry continue. 2. that each can evolve separately. A good example is your stomach breaks down (deconstructive) while your intestines mostly use the broken down nurturing to build up (constructive). I have found interesting constructive and deconstructive aspects of life at every level.
    Perhaps one of the most exciting ideas is that these two processes may help conserve what’s good and promote change of what’s bad – that’s a sort of engine for evolution.
    Natural selection seems to favor little change when something works well. But when the catabolic side improves, there should be pressure on the other anabolic side to change to match. And vice versa. This suggests a process of change that is not from mutation, but from within the organism.
    This is sort of an arms race, but for the good!

  63. musea Says:

    Catabolic and Anabolic do not blend!

  64. musea Says:

    Go to http://tinyurl.com/4ybol4p

    Then scroll down to the absorption of water in the intestinal tract. Then the chart of water in and water out.

    More and more I see the small intestine as the real ‘mouth’ or entry to the body. There carbs, protein, and lipids are taken in in a SEA of water.

    We usually consider the mouth as the entry to the body. But looking at the body as an alimentary tract or tube that is virtually separate from the body, then we see how important the small intestine absorption is, and how much water is involved – almost 9 liters! Note also that all this is under the direction of the Enteric Nervous System. I’ve also suggested that the small intestine is most active during sleep. That is why we sleep. We eat during the day, and sleep to process and absorb the days food.

    What struck me here is how much water is involved. It really seems like we are absorbing nutrients in a sea of water . This reminds me of our ancestory from water.

    Note also how similar the small intestine and human digestion, is to fungi digestion, in that enzymes break down the food outside the ‘body” – in the case of humans, the alimentary tract, and then absorb nutrients in a sea of 9 liters of water.

    The small intestine, ENS, water absorption,and sleep, should be the site of many more discoveries.

  65. musea Says:

    [Update 1/2012, correction for this post. I now think sleep is NOT for taking in nurturing. That is for the daylight hours. Sleep is for waste out and immunity.]
    There is a lot here. What’s most important to me is that REM sleep seems to correspond to a speed up of the muscle contractions of the intestine.

    First this.
    NREM and REM are both determined by readings of the HEAD brain waves during sleep. What’s needed is monitoring the ENS, Enteric Nervous system, during sleep. My suggestion is that sleep is when the Enteric Nervous System, or gut brain, or digestion brain is most active. Here’s a clue to the connection between digestion, the gut muscle contractions, and NREM / REM sleep.

    The Sleep-Gut Connection
    “As light is shed on the circuitry between the two brains (head brain and gut brain), researchers are beginning to understand why people act and feel the way they do. The brain and gut are so much alike that during our sleeping hours, both have natural 90-minute cycles. For the brain, this slow wave sleep is interrupted by periods of rapid eye movement sleep in which dreams occur. ”

    [Here’s the part that may be an important clue]

    “For the gut, the 90-minute cycles also involve slow waves of muscle contractions but, as with REM intervals, these are punctuated by short bursts of rapid muscle movement.

    Could it be that both brains influence each other? The answer is probably yes. REM sleep is a sleep phase characterized by arousal, altered activity of the autonomic nervous system and altered colon (large intestine) function.”
    http://altmedangel.com/gutbrain.htm

    Then this quote from Insomniac by Gayle Greene
    http://tinyurl.com/3awc6ha
    “During sleep, the brain in the gut produces ninety minutes of slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, cycles that correspond to the cycle of deep sleep and REM.. When you disrupt the rhythmical movement of the peristaltic action of the intestines, you disrupt REM patterns; when you disrupt REM, you disrupt peristaltic action – and along with this, regular bowel activity….”

    Then this
    “Peristalsis is a manifestation of two major reflexes within the enteric nervous system that are stimulated by a bolus of foodstuff in the lumen. Mechanical distension and perhaps mucosal irritation stimulate afferent enteric neurons….”
    .http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/basics/peristalsis.html

    My take on this is that NREM = slow waves of muscle contractions that would move the chyme slowly through the small intestine. That would allow for more absorption of nutrients.

    That REM = punctuated periods of short bursts of rapid muscle movement, that would move the chyme quickly through the small intestine. That would allow for less absorption of nutrients.

    This could explain why there is so much NREM sleep at first. This is when we sleep and the bulk of the chyme is released from the stomach. Then the first REM sleep moves the chyme down the intestine, and we repeat the NREM then REM process – each time with shorter periods of NREM/REM as the days food intake is processed. Then we wake when the process is finished.

    STUDIES

    REM sleep tied to obesity risk in children
    http://www.medpagetoday.com/Pediatrics/Obesity/10414

    Lack of REM sleep May raise Obesity Risk In Kids
    http://www.sleepdisordersguide.com/blog/sleep-disorder-news/lack-of-rem-sleep-may-raise-obesity-risk-in-kids/

    http://science.education.nih.gov/supplements/nih3/sleep/guide/info-sleep.htm

    “Although the muscles that move our bodies go limp, other important muscles continue to function in REM sleep. These include the heart, diaphragm, eye muscles, and smooth muscles such as those of the INTESTINES AND BLOOD VESSELS .
    This complex circuitry provides the brain in the gut with the means to act independently. Proof of this can be seen in stroke victims whose brain stem cells, which control swallowing, have been destroyed. If this occurs, a surgeon has to create an opening in the abdominal wall, so that feeding can be accomplished by manually inserting foods directly into the stomach. Once the food is in the stomach, digestion and absorption can take place, even in individuals who are brain dead. The central nervous system is needed for swallowing and for defecation, but from the time the food is swallowed to the moment its remains are expelled from the anus, the gut is in charge.”
    http://altmedangel.com/gutbrain.htm

    This page talks about how long it takes for food to be digested
    http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/basics/transit.html
    “Substances do not move uniformly through the digestive system.
    Materials do not leave segments of the digestive tube in the same order as they arrive.”

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  66. musea Says:

    Please also see discussion under A-U-G World in this blog.
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-mC

  67. musea Says:

    This looks at a daily digestion cycle.
    Highlights: Why do we sleep, why are there two types of sleep, why are our muscles in paralysis and there is rapid eye movement during REM sleep, what is the connection between metabolism and sleep, why is blood pressure so high in the morning, how important is the ENS or gut brain on the digestion cycle, what happens during sleep in the small intestines, why is the digestion cycle 24 hours in most species?

    My suggestion is that there seems to be a daily metabolic cycle. When awake, we eat and digest. When we sleep, eating stops, the intestines begin to absorb nurturing. Then we wake , blood pressure rises, nurturing is sent by the heart, throughout the body through the bloodstream, waste is evacuated out of the colon, and the cycle repeats. Though these processes may be working most of the day, there seems to be a circadian daily cycle that goes through one complete digestion process. Doing the bulk of digestion in separate steps during a daily cycle, would seem to give a selective advantage.

    There are two main phases to sleep. First phase I suggest , corresponds with NREM sleep. Digested food or chyme from the stomach and intestines, is released into the small intestines and absorbed through the villi. Then the second phase I suggest corresponds with REM sleep. There are very strong intestine contractions that re-churns the chyme, and moves it forward toward the colon. Then the next phase of NREM sleep absorbs more nurturing, and the next REM sleep phase, re-churns and moves the chyme forward.This two part process repeats itself through the night.

    Here is some DISCUSSION followed by quotes from STUDIES.
    Group, if there is anyone that knows about the ENS, let me know.

    Discussion:

    There seems to be a daily circadian cycle connected to digestion. The bulk of human life seems to revolve or build upon this daily cycle.

    My suggestion is that wake is the eating and digesting phase; and sleep is the stop eating, and absorption of nutrients phase. Then we wake and repeat the process.

    There may be much stronger contractions in the intestines in sleep than during waking. The daytime actions of the intestines seems to include a house cleaning phase called the migrating motor complex that happens periodically. This stops when we eat.
    Both the initial NREM period, followed by the REM period cycle may have strong contractions. But I think the REM has the strongest – so much so that this is why there is voluntary muscle paralysis during this phase of sleep. And too why there is a strong rapid eye movement and sometimes nightmares with it.
    The stomach, which does not release digested food in the order eaten, may release certain digested food before sleep.
    Naps may be milder with much less stressful contractions.

    Sleep seems to be the main daily period of intestine absorption of most nutrients, then during waking in the morning, the heart , which has been at it’s lowest blood pressure during sleep, now rises and distributes the nurturing to the body. Note that heart attacks seem to be most prevalent in this morning phase.

    By understanding and resolving unconscious problems of sleep and digestion, mostly in the ENS, we should be able to resolve the trauma that they cause. Besides the obvious problems of digestion, or sleep problems, this may include, eating disorders, some heart problems, and a layer of chronic problems and personality disorders.

    Studies and Quotes

    Connection between sleep and metabolism quote:

    There is a high amount of SWS, slow wave sleep, in children, with slow declines during adulthood and much less or no SWS at all in retirees. THIS DECLINE PARALLELS THAT OF METABOLIC RATE IN HUMANS. In other species with no decline in SWS with advancing age, there is no decline in metabolic rate. – Understanding Sleep and Dreaming by William H. Moorcroft, Paula Belcher.

    Enteric Nervous System, ENS, or gut brain.

    The enteric nervous system is more complex and more similar to the central nervous system than any other region of the peripheral nervous system. It is an independent integrated system capable of mediating reflex activity in the absence of central nervous system input.

    Sleep and Gut Motility

    Although sleep cycles and MMC –

    (migrating motor complex – defined: , The migrating motor complex is a distinct pattern of electromechanical activity observed in gastrointestinal smooth muscle during the periods between meals. It is thought to serve a “housekeeping” role and sweep residual undigested material through the digestive tube. As studied in dogs and man, the cycle recurs every 1.5 to 2 hours)

    – cycles are independent, it is clear that sleep does modulate gastrointestinal motility. At night, MMC periodicity is shorter and less variable compared to day [16, 17], and the distal progression of phase III is slower [15]. Kellow et al. found that nocturnal MMCs were less likely to have an esophageal component compared to daytime MMCs …Is the cyclic nature of migrating motor complex dependent on the sleep cycle?

    Circadian Rhythms and metabolism

    There is currently sufficient evidence to suggest that circadian rhythms are important to gut function, metabolism and mucosal defence and that further investigation will uncover connections between disordered rhythms and gastrointestinal malfunction.

    Metabolism as daily cycle;

    Mammalian metabolism is tightly regulated, balancing fuel storage and expenditure, in alternating cycles. Evidence that these alternating episodes are under the control of circadian feedback loops involving clock genes has snowballed in recent years (for a review, see Green et al.8). Strong hints of links between metabolism and circadian rhythms came from the dramatic metabolic phenotypes of mice with mutations in clock genes5 and the association of BMAL1 mutations with Type 2 diabetes in humans.34 Conversely, evidence has emerged recently showing that diet affects circadian rhythms and clock gene expression.35–37 The biochemical and genetic pathways that constitute the feedback loops driving circadian rhythms and metabolism are rapidly being unravelled,8,10,12,13,15,38 revealing an increasingly complex network of interlocking loops (Fig. 2) that serve to balance and integrate various metabolic parameters to achieve a fine-tuned oscillating pattern of storing and spending to match the organism’s pattern of rest and activity.
    -this and below quotes from, Rhythm of digestion: keeping time in the gastrointestinal tract …

    When left to its own (free running), the full circadian cycle takes just under 24 h in most species. To keep the system synchronized with the 24 h light–dark cycle, the internal clocks are reset (or entrained) by distinct environmental cues (called Zeitgebers), most prominently light.

    70% OF IMMUNOCYTES in intestinal tract PLUS HIGHEST VIGILANCE IS LATE NIGHT, EARLY MORN.
    The gastrointestinal tract harbours more than 70% of the immunocytes in the body62 and its lining can be regarded as being in a constant state of mild inflammation that defends against pathogens and toxins that find their way into the lumen. This immune vigilance combines with the integrity of the mucosal barrier in guarding the intestine.
    The intestinal immune system appears to be set to its most vigilant AT THE END OF THE NIGHT / BEGINNING OF THE DAY when expression of enteric defensins and Toll-like receptors peak in the gut.21 Likewise, mucosal cell proliferation in the stomach and small intestine peaks at this time.18 In human volunteers, it has been shown that the gastric protective factor trefoil protein 2 peaks in the night and early morning, between 0300 and 0900 hours. Thus, the circadian control of mucosal protection may provide a daily defensive priming of the gut.63 Disruption of this rhythm may compromise mucosal function and render the gut less resistant to inflammatory challenges.
    Wake – eat

    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  68. musea Says:

    Now I think the inner conflicts of people, come from a healthy ENS, enteric nervous system or gut brain, working automatically and a head brain that interferes because of infancy trauma.

    The ENS, enteric nervous system or gut brain that controls digestion, is somewhat set by birth. But the head brain’s, food in and waste out, pattern is set up after birth and during breast feeding or weaning phases – somehow that plasticity was selected for.

    But too often there is inner conflicts between the two. The ENS automatically does one thing, and the Head brain says do another. This conflict seems to be in sleep when the ENS is most active in processing the day’s intake of food. This conflict comes from infancy when breast feeding or weaning sets up specific food in and waste out patterns. These patterns may conflict with the automatic processes of the ENS.

    The ENS wants to subconsciously take in enough nurturing and excrete out enough waste. But the head brain wants to over compensate for problems in infancy. This sets up chronic conflicts between the two, conflicts that are hidden or subconscious.

    The head brain, wants to override what the ENS is doing to over compensate for what happened during breast feeding and weaning.

  69. musea Says:

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-nS

    This is a summary of new ideas on the health hypothesis so far.

  70. musea Says:

    Separation Anxiety, Stranger Anxiety.
    There are two phases that most all children go through in infancy, separation anxiety and stranger anxiety. They both seem to occur during the weaning phase.

    Here is my suggestion:
    Separation anxiety, fear of loosing the mother, may be a projection of the fear of loosing mother’s milk. This occurs during the period of weaning away from breast milk.

    Stranger anxiety, fear of strangers, may be a projection of the fear of taking in first foods after weaning. This also occurs during the period of weaning away from breast milk.

    These ideas come from looking at the ENS, enteric nervous system, or gut brain. It seems to be a very important part of, not only digestion, but all aspects of health.

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes do not blend
    !http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  71. musea Says:

    This hypothesis has some new developments.

    The most important is that REM sleep may be that part of sleep that takes in and moderates much of the water in the body.

    Brief summary:

    This hypothesis suggests
    1. That most health problems are sleep problems
    2. Sleep is the part of the daily digestion cycle that takes in necessary nurturing and water.
    3. Sleep has two parts, NREM or deep sleep, and REM. Each has a specific role
    4. NREM sleep is the part of the sleep cycle that takes nurturing and water in from the small intestines.
    REM sleep is the part of the sleep cycle that takes water in.
    5. The digestion process is controlled by the Enteric Nervous System.
    6. Sleep problems are problems of not enough nurturing and water in infancy. This sets up stress and trauma.
    7. This stress manifests itself in 4 major stress reactions: fight or flight, tend and befriend.
    8. There is a 2nd sleep/digestion pattern that is set up during infancy. It seems to be set up during the breast feeding /weaning period.
    9. This sleep/digestion pattern seems to adjust the natal metabolic rate. This needs to be changed to solve the health problems

    Fuller summary:

    This hypothesis suggests
    1. That most health problems are sleep problems, except for genetic problems, injuries , infections, or too little food and water.
    2. Sleep is the part of the daily digestion cycle that takes in necessary nurturing and water. It is most directed to body maintenance. Waking is most directed to getting and eating food; also, sex, and child care.
    3. Sleep has two parts, NREM or deep sleep, and REM. Each has a specific role
    4. NREM sleep is the part of the sleep cycle that takes nurturing in from the small intestines. This is about 80% of sleep.
    REM sleep is the part of the sleep cycle that takes water in from the colon. This is about 20% of sleep. The two phases alternate during the night.
    5. The digestion process is controlled by the Enteric Nervous System.
    6. Sleep problems are problems of not enough nurturing and water in infancy. This sets up stress and trauma.
    7. This stress manifests itself in 4 major stress reactions: fight or flight, tend and befriend.
    8. There is a 2nd sleep/digestion pattern that is set up during infancy. It seems to be set up during the breast feeding /weaning period.
    9. When there is breast feeding / weaning problems, this sleep/digestion pattern seems to adjust the natal metabolic rate. This needs to be changed to solve the health problems.

    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

    Catabolic and Anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend!

  72. musea Says:

    Lately I’ve been finding that it looks like, more and more of those health and psychological problems that are hidden compulsions, or stress reactions that seem outside conscious decision; is in sleep and the ENS, Enteric Nervous system, or digestion brain. The ENS, or ‘gut brain’ can work independently of the head brain. Sleep may be when the Enteric Nervous System takes over, to process the day’s food. I made a short list just now.

    Partial list of problems that may be in sleep and connected to the ENS:

    1. sleep disorders
    2. weight and eating disorders
    3. urination, defecation disorders
    4. sexual disorders
    5. allergies
    6. phobias
    7. compulsions
    8. addictions
    9. heart trauma and water regulation

    ‘Gut’ feelings may really be gut brain or enteric nervous system feeling and thinking – Gut feelings really are gut feelings.

    We think that most of our problems are problems from the environment outside of us or from the people we interact with. This hypothesis suggests that the problems are inside of us, that they are repressed and come from the unconscious enteric nervous system, and that we transfer these fears and angers to outside events and other people..

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)

  73. musea Says:

    Conglomerate Brain: There seems to be a shift in thinking going on. The old idea was the head brain controlled everything and that the head brain was king and the body followed its directions.

    Now that is not so clear. The head brain has two main hemispheres that can work separately. The head brain has not only the cerebrum, but the cerebellum (which has two hemispheres too), limbic system, and brain stem.

    But beyond the head brain entirely is the Enteric Nervous System or gut brain. Even when its connection to the head brain – the Vagus nerve is severed, it can and does act independently.

    The liver is such a vast multipurpose gland that I wonder if it should not be considered as working sometimes separately, and be a mini brain center too. (see the post on liver circadian rhythms).

    The details are murky but there is merging a concept of a conglomerate brain – not one brain that controls the body, but different brain areas that control different aspects of the body. And that sometimes these work in harmony and sometimes they work independently to the point of conflict. And that the nervous system is more a loose confederation of somewhat separate brains and nervous system parts, than perhaps we had imagined.

    My study of the ENS has suggested that the head brain or consciousness brain, that is not conscious during sleep, is more concerned with waking activities. The conscious head brain is then the day brain that eats, reproduces, and tends to children.

    When this brain is unconscious or during sleep, eating stops, and the ENS begins processing the days food. Two main sleep divisions – the first , the first 90-120 minutes is for taking in food through the small intestines, and the 2nd shorter cycle moves what’s left into the colon. The cycle repeats till waking.

    Now I wonder what the liver has to do with this. It seems to be the next step in the nutrient processing daily cycle.

  74. musea Says:

    Clock Genes and digestion system
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19566817

    Abstract
    The best characterized mammalian circadian rhythms follow a light-
    entrained central master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and
    are associated with fluctuations in the activities of clock genes,
    including Clock, Bmal1, Per and Cry, the products of which bind to
    sequences in the promoters of effector genes. This is the central
    clock. 2. In the present review, we discuss evidence for an
    independent, but interacting, gut-associated circadian clock, the
    peripheral clock, which is entrained by food. 3. Disruption of
    circadian rhythms is associated with a wide range of pathologies, most
    prominently metabolism linked, but the effects of disruption of
    circadian rhythms on the digestive system are less well studied,
    although also likely to lead to functional consequences. There are
    clues suggestive of links between gastrointestinal disorders related
    to inflammation, cancer and motility and disruption of peripheral
    rhythms. Research aimed at understanding these links is still in its
    infancy. 4. We also discuss practical aspects of the presence of
    circadian rhythms in gastrointestinal tissues for researchers related
    to experimental design, data interpretation and the choice of animal
    models. 5. There is currently sufficient evidence to suggest that
    circadian rhythms are important to gut function, metabolism and
    mucosal defence and that further investigation will uncover
    connections between disordered rhythms and gastrointestinal
    malfunction.

  75. musea Says:

    Today I read yet another evolution book saying that there is no direction to evolution. There is.and it’s to get better anabolic and catabolic processes that better adapt to that environment.

    First there is a mutation. The result is better adaptation such that the new mutation is selected for. The mutation is on a catabolic process. That would spur the anabolic processes to change to catch up and better fit the new mutation. There may not be pressure to change the anabolic every time, but some times it would. That would suggest that the first catabolic mutation would spur the selection of the best matching anabolic process. That suggests that a positive mutation on a catabolic process would also sometimes stimulate a positive change in the anabolic processes. This also works the other way on a positive mutation on a anabolic process.

    Not let’s go the other way. First there is a mutation. The result is worse adaptation such that the new mutation does harm. The mutation is on a catabolic process. That would put pressure on connected anabolic processes too. Sometimes there would be bad results. But sometimes the anabolic processes could be stable enough so that the negative mutation is mitigated. That suggests that a bad catabolic mutation can sometimes be mitigated by a stable anabolic process. This too works the other way.

    Both cases suggest how there is a direction to evolution – better anabolic and catabolic processes that better adapt to that environment.

    Comment?

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)

    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  76. musea Says:

    The ENS, enteric nervous system or gut brain, seems to be much more important to all aspects of health than we have ever imagined. So how can we resolve the problems in the ENS?
    Here are some things that might help:
    1. knowing what’s going on. Sometimes bringing ENS digestion/sleep trauma to awareness in the conscious mind can help resolve it. Knowing that this is in the ENS, how the ENS works, and it’s connection to sleep/digestion etc. can help.

    2. knowing that ENS trauma is almost always food in and waste out trauma, and that a pattern of food in and waste out is set up in infancy during the breast feeding and weaning periods.

    3. knowing that ENS trauma will also manifest itself when that pattern in infancy is triggered during puberty or as an adult.

    4. knowing which of the two weight extremes you may be. There are two obvious main ways to tell if there is ENS trauma. Both involve over compensation for a lack of breast feeding. They are being overweight and being underweight. Each has specific patterns and trauma.

    5. knowing that the ENS, or gut brain doesn’t learn by reasoning, but learns by repetition (like learning to tie shoes. The classic example of food and digestion conditioning is the Pavlov’s Dog experiments) – so resolve the ENS trauma, not through reasoning alone – but using repetition to help.

    Most of these may help, some of these may not – time will tell.

  77. musea Says:

    Clock genes suggest a daily cycle in digestion system
    http://tinyurl.com/46ywt8c

    Here are some quotes:

    Disruptions to our circadian rhythm, the 24-hour clock that drives sleeping and wakefulness, affect our bodies in more ways than previously believed.

    New research shows that each of our organs contains cells with their own circadian-clock genes that help bodily processes, such as digestion, operate with maximum efficiency at certain times of day.

    When a person’s circadian clock is thrown off—by jet lag or shift work or eating at the wrong time—it can, over time, contribute to weight gain and depression. It may even increase the likelihood of heart and liver problems.

    Each organ operates on its own internal clock, producing enzymes and molecules at different levels depending on the time of day; the brain works to make sure all the clocks are synchronized.

    The clock genes appear to have a particularly strong influence on metabolism and how the body handles fat and sugar.

    It isn’t clear exactly how disruptions in circadian rhythm could influence body weight. One theory is that at certain times of day, intestinal bacteria may be more or less active at breaking down food into molecules to be absorbed by the intestine. Eating fat at a time when the bacteria are less active could lead to poorer food breakdown and more fat stored, Dr. Turek says.

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  78. musea Says:

    Clock regulates nutrient absorption
    http://www.jlr.org/content/early/2009/04/22/jlr.M900085-JLR200.full.pdf
    “Various functions of the intestine, such as gastric emptying, colonic
    motility,
    DNA synthesis and epithelial cell renewal, exhibit circadian
    activities…
    Several studies indicate that transporters involved in
    the absorption of fat, carbohydrates and proteins show diurnal
    rhythms.”

  79. musea Says:

    High levels of melatonin and serotonin in small intestine suggest the importance of digestion on health and well being.

    The gastrointestinal tract has 400 times more melatonin than in the
    pineal gland. 400 times!
    Does anyone know why there would be so much more sleep hormone in the
    digestive tract?
    Not just a little but 400 times more.

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/r47518675jw057j0/

    95% of serotonin in small intestine:

    You can actually keep your small intestine healthy and happy. Yes, happy. It contains as many neurons as your spinal column. In many ways, the small intestine is like a second brain. Ninety-five percent of your serotonin — the brain’s mood-regulating chemical — is contained in your small intestine’s elaborate network of nerves. That’s a big reason why we feel strong emotions like fear, anticipation, and love deep in our guts as well as our minds. The intestine’s nerves can also suffer from the same diseases that affect the brain.

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20051005/news_1c05brain.html

  80. musea Says:

    Here’s research on the Liver cycle with a sizable quote. Note it’s a
    day night cycle.
    That’s very much a wake / sleep cycle. And if the liver is on such a
    daily cycle,
    and it produces bile for digestion of fats – then the digestion cycle
    must be on a daily cycle too.

    http://www.hepatitis-central.com/mt/archives/2010/07/working_with_yo.html

    The Liver Cycle
    Although scientists are just beginning to recognize the phases of the
    liver’s cycle, the following appear to describe the hepatic clock:
    The liver synthesizes complex chemicals and processes toxins the most
    when the production of bile is lowest.
    Along the same lines, chemical synthesis and toxin processing is
    lowest while the liver’s production of bile is highest.
    Because bile is needed for food processing, the liver makes a greater
    proportion during the day – and less at night.
    Bile production is assumed to be at its highest at 9am and lowest at
    9pm.
    After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions,
    synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.
    The cycle begins shifting around 3am, when the liver slows chemical
    synthesis and readies itself for bile production.
    The liver cycle shifts again around 3pm, when chemical synthesis
    begins to increase and bile production decreases.
    Thus, the liver is most prepared to aid digestion with its synthesis
    of bile between 9am and 9pm.

  81. musea Says:

    Digestion as a 24 hour cycle. Some assorted speculations and facts. (as of Nov/2011)

    SUMMARY: The daylight hours seem to be generally more for getting food, eating, and digesting it. The sleeping hours seem to shift to using the food for nurturing and rebuilding the body.

    FACT: Recent studies have shown that the circadian-clock genes (are) present not only in the central nervous system but also in numerous peripheral organs, such as the liver, kidney and heart.

    We eat and begin digestion. Through the daytime hours the digestive tract processes the food we eat. When night and sleep comes, eating and drinking stop, digestion slows down, the intestines finish up their work, and the liver shifts from bile production to body maintenance. Towards morning the colon is active. We wake excrete out waste, and cycle repeats.

    FACTS: The Liver has a circadian rhythm.
    The liver synthesizes complex chemicals and processes toxins the most when the production of bile is lowest. Along the same lines, chemical synthesis and toxin processing is lowest while the liver’s production of bile is highest.
    Because bile is needed for food processing, the liver makes a greater proportion during the day – and less at night. The liver synthesizes complex chemicals and processes toxins the most when the production of bile is lowest. Along the same lines, chemical synthesis and toxin processing is lowest while the liver’s production of bile is highest.
    Bile production is assumed to be at its highest at 9am and lowest at 9pm. After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions, synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins. The cycle begins shifting around 3am, when the liver slows chemical synthesis and readies itself for bile production. The liver cycle shifts again around 3pm, when chemical synthesis begins to increase and bile production decreases. Thus, the liver is most prepared to aid digestion with its synthesis of bile between 9am and 9pm.
    The liver occupies a strategic position in the circulation; it is the first organ to come into contact with absorbed nutrients. Therefore it functions as a major sensor of substrate, electrolyte and water input into the organism and reports this information via sensory, afferent nerves to the brain and thence via efferent nerves to other peripheral organs. The liver is also a major effector organ with a key role in maintaining whole body homeostasis.

    FACT: What happens during sleep?
    In some cases the ENS, Enteric Nervous System, secretes more hormones than the head brain.
    Serotonin is found mostly in ENS. It’s connected to immunity. Immunity is suggested as a cause for sleep.
    The release of growth hormone reaches its peak during deep sleep
    Your metabolic rate slows (during sleep) which is perfect for muscle tissue repair and growth – Increased blood flow to the muscles
    The human gut contain receptors for benzodiazepine, a drug that relieves anxiety.
    The interval between peristaltic contractions in the small intestine and colon is increased in NREM sleep compared to wakefulness and there is an increase in colonic activity after waking
    It is mostly during sleep that the sex hormone testosterone and the fertility hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone and leuteinising hormone, are secreted.
    The levels of certain agents which fight disease rise during sleep and drop when we are awake.
    Moderate amounts of sleep deprivation reduce the levels of white blood cells which form part of the body’s defence system.

    FACT: Morning awakening was associated with high-amplitude independent and related colonic motility in all colonic segments
    We can reclaim from 1 – 4.5 liters of water from the colon each day?

    SPECULATION: During the ending of the sleep cycle, when the digestion system is at it’s lowest, water is absorbed from the colon to recycle for the next days digestive needs.

    FACT: It is more accurate to consider the net fluid movements in the bowel as a cycling of fluid rather than a turnover of fluid. This cycling of fluid into the gut and back to the circulation each day has been called the enterosystemic circulation. http://www.anaesthesiamcq.com/FluidBook/fl3_5.php

    SPECULATION: Conglomerate Brain. The idea of a single head brain controlling the nervous system is changing to the idea of a conglomerate brain with different parts controlling different thing. The head brain uses senses to monitor what’s outside the body. The ENS or enteric nervous system controls the digestion system.

    FACT: The ENS can work independently of the Head brain.
    FACT: … About 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus, carry information from the gut to the brain and not the other way around.
    FACT: The enteric nervous system uses more than 30 neurotransmitters, just like the brain, and in fact 95 percent of the body’s serotonin is found in the bowels.
    FACT: Just like the larger brain in the head, researchers say, this system (the ENS) sends and receives impulses, records experiences and respond to emotions. Its nerve cells are bathed and influenced by the same neurotransmitters. The gut can upset the brain just as the brain can upset the gut.
    FACT: The gut is actually the largest of the body’s endocrine organs, making the endocrine system and digestive system closely linked.

    SPECULATION; The waking hours is mostly a catabolic state. The sleeping hours is mostly an anabolic state. That’s why we sleep – to repair and build the body.

    QUOTE; During our waking hours, the body burns oxygen and food to provide energy. This is known as a catabolic state, in which more energy is spent than conserved, using up the body’s resources.
    This state is dominated by the work of stimulating hormones such as adrenaline and natural cortisteroids. However, when we sleep we move into an anabolic state – in which energy conservation, repair and growth take over. Levels of adrenaline and corticosteroids drop and the body starts to produce human growth hormone (HGH).

    SPECULATION The digestion system pattern seems to be set up in infancy and is connected to breast feeding / weaning.

    SPECULATION The lack of breast feeding causes weight problems and other unconscious trauma that can lead to chronic health problems, addictions and other physical and psychological problems. There may be repressed anger or fear connected with trauma in this digestion pattern.

    SPECULATION Breast feeding and weaning trauma can lead to two types of weight problems – too little nutrients = overweight / too little water to process nutrients = underweight.

    SPECULATION: Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend.

    SPECULATION: Life may be that chemical system that best adapted to the day/night cycle with a catabolic/anabolic system.

    QUESTION: What causes the liver to switch from bile production for digestion to body repair? Does the ENS control this, or does the liver switch when the day’s digestion ends, or when sleep begins.
    QUESTION: Is the ENS similar to the psychological idea of the subconscious mind?

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  82. musea Says:

    ‘According to the repair and restoration theory of sleep, sleeping is essential for revitalizing and restoring the physiological processes that keep the body and mind healthy and properly functioning.’

    I tend to agree with this quote. And I’ve got some new ideas on this.

    My suggestion is that sleep is body restoration in this order:
    Head brain becomes unconscious for repair in NREM sleep, SLOW WAVE, or DEEP SLEEP
    Body has muscle lock down for repair in REM SLEEP.

    After dark the liver switches from bile production to restoration. ‘Bile production is assumed to be at its highest at 9am and lowest at 9pm. After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions, synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.” Then we sleep and begin the repair and restoration for the next day.

    During NREM or deep sleep the head brain is turned off / unconscious – I think it’s turned off for repairs. Therefore the NREM sleep periods are specifically to restore the brain during the sleep/night cycle.

    During REM sleep our mind is semi-awake but our muscles are shut down – I think it’s turned off for muscle repairs. Therefore the REM sleep periods are specifically to restore the body muscles during the sleep/night cycle.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  83. musea Says:

    Here’s where it gets more interesting.

    Are cyanobacteria on a 24 hour cycle too? (See story below)
    OR the bigger question is this – Could it be that all life is on a 24
    hour cycle?
    OR is it restricted all life under the sun,
    OR is it some smaller set of life?

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100318141544.htm

    QUOTE
    A team of researchers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego has shown how cell division in a type of bacteria known as cyanobacteria is controlled by the same kind of circadian rhythms that govern human sleep patterns.
    Previous studies have shown that even though cyanobacteria do not “sleep” in the same way that humans do, they cycle through active and resting periods on a 24-hour schedule. Cyanobacteria depend on sunlight for photosynthesis, so they are most active during the day.

  84. musea Says:

    Prokaryotes and circadian rhythms article.
    http://circadiana.blogspot.com/2006/03/clocks-in-bacteria-i-synechococcus.html

    I tend to think this is in all living things, though less so in underground or deep sea life.
    I also tend to think that us humans have covered up much of this in our society, and that
    there is still great repressed trauma in all of us at dusk and dawn when our bodies
    shift from active day food getting, to self repair night, sleep. Note that body temperature
    reaches a peak at dusk, and at it’s lowest around dawn.

    Following the circadian rhythm and
    becoming aware of it and its influence, may be a key factor to good health
    For example note the extreme danger of most heart problems happening at waking.

  85. musea Says:

    Someone posted a link to 10 dangerous things that science of the future might bring. I countered with this.
    Here is something that will challenge all that. What if the base of all that control and greed is resolved? My study of the ENS, or enteric nervous system, or gut brain (google it for info) suggests that food in and waste out trauma causes virtually ALL our trauma like greed, excess dependency, excess anger, excess fear etc. Further that most of this trauma is hidden. We don’t address it, and instead foist it on innocent others as their fault. Further that this food in and waste out trauma is set up in infancy with breast feeding. So at the bottom of all these scientific nightmare scenarios is trauma from ENS which in turn is from breast feeding trauma in infancy. Finally we see if we have enough in infancy, we don’t transfer our infancy pain onto others. Now that’s a discovery. http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

  86. musea Says:

    Quote: “The (Enteric Nervous System) is way too complicated to have evolved only to make sure things move out of your colon,” says Emeran Mayer, professor of physiology, psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (U.C.L.A.).

    Those handful of readers of my posts, have seen a year or more of posts trying to figure why we sleep and what the mind does during sleep – both NREM and REM sleep.

    Now, I have to say that i’ve been going in the wrong direction. I think I was wrong. Those who said I was wrong, where likely right and now I agree with them. Sleep may not be much about the head brain at all. ‘Unconscious higher mind during sleep may be unconscious higher mind during sleep.
    Unconscious IS unconscious.

    Now I tend to think the head brain during sleep, is conserving energy, doing some basic repairs, and resting. The liver shifts in the daily cycle from bile production to chemical synthesis and toxin processing – that needs to be explored more and find out what role the liver plays in sleep. *

    The idea that shifted this was a new way to look at the Enteric Nervous system. Now I see the alimentary tract and the gut brain as mostly a catabolic digestion tube.
    To give an analogy.

    THE MITOCHONDRIA IS THE POWERHOUSE TO THE CELL as the
    THE ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM IS THE POWERHOUSE TO THE BODY.

    That means that the digestion tube is the powerhouse for the body.
    That it is mostly catabolic
    That it has a daily cycle a circadian rhythm,
    That the daily cycle is this –
    during the day the main job is to tear down and digest food,
    during the night/sleep, stop eating and digesting, excrete out waste, and take water back from the colon for the next day.
    That, because the small intestines is where digested nutrients are taken into the body, that this is the danger point for invading bacteria, that most of the fight and flight response evolved from this and the ENS response.
    That because most of the melatonin is from the ENS that the ENS is a key to why we sleep.

    There is one fly in the ointment here. That is this – if the ENS was all fight and flight, all digest food, and excrete out waste, all catabolic – then why does it also produce the most serotonin and melatonin, plus drugs such as benzodiazepine.
    —————————–
    *Because bile is needed for food processing, the liver makes a greater proportion during the day – and less at night.
    Bile production is assumed to be at its highest at 9am and lowest at 9pm.
    After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions, synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.
    The cycle begins shifting around 3am, when the liver slows chemical synthesis and readies itself for bile production.
    The liver cycle shifts again around 3pm, when chemical synthesis begins to increase and bile production decreases.

    **
    The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body

    Nearly every chemical that controls the brain is also located in the stomach region, including hormones and neurotransmitters such as Serotonin, Dopamine, Glutamate, GABA and Norepinephrine. The gut contains 100 million neurons – more than the spinal cord. But there are also two-dozen small brain proteins; major cells of the immune system; one class of the body’s natural opiates; and native benzodiazepines.

    Ninety-five percent of your serotonin — the brain’s mood-regulating chemical — is contained in your small intestine’s elaborate network of nerves. That’s a big reason why we feel strong emotions like fear, anticipation, and love deep in our guts as well as our minds.

    The concentration of melatonin in the gastrointestinal tissues surpasses blood levels by 10–100 times and there is at least 400× more melatonin in the gastrointestinal tract than in the pineal gland.

    The question has been raised: Why does the human gut contain receptors for benzodiazepine, a drug that relieves anxiety?

  87. musea Says:

    Why do we have a sweet tooth? My bio ideas suggest this reason. Sugars are the easiest to digest – a lot easier than protein, fats, and fiber. When we have trauma in the digestion system – sugars is a quick easy way to digest.

  88. musea Says:

    Before I have suggested that breast feeding sets up a pattern of food
    in and waste out. But how? This study may explain at least one way.

    Breast milk sets up the small intestines : ” The lining of a
    newborn’s gut is particularly vulnerable to damage as it has never
    been exposed to food or drink. The new study highlights the importance
    of breastfeeding in the first few days after the birth…. (and)
    Scientists at Queen Mary, University of London have discovered that an
    ingredient in human breast milk protects and repairs the delicate
    intestines of newborn babies.”

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090629200754.htm

  89. musea Says:

    Loosing weight – or gaining weight for people who have been thin all their life, is very very tough. The reason why reason doesn’t seem to work IMO is that breast feeding in infancy sets up a food in and waste out pattern. Without enough breast milk in childhood, you are ‘hungry’ the rest of your life – and you are hungry not in you mind but in the ENS , or enteric nervous system, or gut brain. I’m working on a way to resolve that .
    Strangely having excess appetite from too low breast feeding, would more likely allow a child to keep living thousands of years ago. So how do you oppose your body trying to save you in a way that’s worked for millions of years? (see reply above).

  90. musea Says:

    Water!

    This hypothesis about ENS (enteric nervous system, or gut brain), as key to the food in waste out process and sleep etc., sure has had a lot of mixed messages. My own experience, my own ‘gut’ feeling was that somehow the ENS affected the entire body during sleep? That’s why we sleep. But how could the gut brain affect the entire body so much that it sleeps for half the day to do it?

    During sleep there was both build up processes like memory consolidation, and the release of growth hormone, but also waste out processes through the liver switch from bile promotion to chemical synthesis and toxin processing. Then add all those brain hormones in the ENS like melatonin and serotonin. How could the ENS do all that?

    Then this came to me – The ENS daily digestion cycle ends with sleep where we stop eating and water is reabsorbed from the colon – though it goes on somewhat all the time. Somehow I now suggest that sleep is the time when the brain and body gets the extra water it needs from the ENS. That water during sleep, would facilitate all those clues and attributes that we find in sleep, and the brain hemispheres could be unconscious during that phase, etc. etc.

    Could water regulation and water uptake from the colon during sleep be the reason we sleep?

    That’s my latest idea But the question is, is night water regulation so important that it is the cause of sleep in all creatures?

    So I took a look at what water does. Note:

    1. Water seems to support memory recall, a key theory of why we sleep. (see current sleep theories in URL below)

    2. Water is key in temperature regulation, and warm blooded creatures sleep more than other creatures. Another key theory of why we sleep.

    I’ve found these notes on the net (assorted sites) on water and health.

    Dehydration can impair short-term memory function and the recall of long-term memory. The ability to perform mental arithmetic, like calculating whether or not you’ll be late for work if you hit snooze for another 15 minutes, is compromised when your fluids are low.

    Over the course of a typical twenty-four hour period, the longest spell most of us go without fluid intake is the six to eight hours we spend sleeping. Sleeping is hardly the kind of activity that you sweat over, but that doesn’t mean you’re not losing water during the night. With every somnolent breath, you expel moisture, and the cumulative effect of a night’s sleep is to dry out. (My note: perhaps that’s when we uptake water out of the colon and into the body.)

    Years of research have found that when we’re parched, we have more difficulty keeping our attention focused. Dehydration can impair short-term memory function and the recall of long-term memory. The ability to perform mental arithmetic, like calculating whether or not you’ll be late for work if you hit snooze for another 15 minutes, is compromised when your fluids are low.

    To put the water requirements in perspective: The average adult brain is 1.3 to 1.4kg and is approx 2% (obviously varies) of the overall weight of the adult human. The brain is 70-80% water and at least two more significant fluids which are reliant upon the availability of water indirectly are present: blood @ 150 ml (10%) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) @ 150 ml (10%) (from Rengachary, S.S. and Ellenbogen, R.G., editors, Principles of Neurosurgery, Edinburgh: Elsevier Mosby, 2005).

    You need water to regulate body temperature and to provide the means for nutrients to travel to your organs and tissues. Water also transports oxygen to your cells, removes waste, and protects your joints and organs.

    Water theories – see this url, 3.8 function of sleep:
    http://tinyurl.com/6lz2yss

    Tom Hendricks
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  91. musea Says:

    Still exploring these water ideas.
    I found that heart rate increases during REM sleep – but why? Could this have
    something to do with my idea of most water uptake from the colon as the cause for sleep? *

    Then it dawned on me. The REM heart increase – is the pump. During NREM could it be that the heart and water
    in the blood rate is average or low, then we reach REM sleep and the heart pumps much faster (see facts below)
    to move the water through the mind for memory consolidation, and body for repair etc.
    Then deep sleep and we slow it down for the cells to uptake the water.

    So sleep is water uptake with a REM pump and extra heart rate to move the water through the sleeping body.
    This both nurtures the body with water, and helps protect them by taking away waste.

    HEART RATE SURGES IN REM
    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is characterized by periods of profound cardiac autonomic activation
    evident in heart rate surges in humans and canines.

    The analysis of the autonomic nervous system during sleep by the investigation of heart-rate variability gives
    further insight into the regulation of sleep. We found that when the brain is very active as in the ‘dream’—
    REM stage, heart rate has long-time correlations, like in the wake phase. In contrast, in deep sleep correlations
    of the heart rate vanish after a small number of beats. In light sleep finally, the heart rate seems to become
    uncorrelated as well, but only after an increased number of beats.

    *This seems to set up a food and water daily cycle for humans.
    During the day we eat, and drink. The small intestine absorbs the nutrients.
    Then at night eating and drinking stops. Much water is absorbed from the colon, during the sleep phase.
    This is pumped through the body to both repair it and get waste out. The REM period is the major water pumping phase.
    We wake and repeat – day food wake, night water sleep.

  92. musea Says:

    More and more I see sleep as not building up of the body – that’s what happens during the day and during the eating and digestion phase – but sleep is when the body stops eating and digestion and is shut down so that the body can fight non self infections, bacterial invasions, etc.

    But if true then there should be reports that lack of sleep leads to infections. There are. See excerpts quoted below.

    Now I think the entire sleep period is for immunity and protection. That’s why the head brain has to shut down, unconscious, and the body is shut down, muscles shut down in REM. The only thing that is not asleep, besides the immune system, is the non self. Maybe that in some way is a way to help tell self from non self – self is asleep, non self is not and active. Self is unconscious mind, and body muscles shut down. Non self is what is not asleep.

    Why would infants sleep so much if sleep was not about growing but about immunity? If true then the first infant period, when babies sleep more than at any time in their lives, is more for protection and setting up an immune system, not growth. That is a new way of looking at things. Babies have to first set up an immune system before most growing starts.

    I think that if any of this will hold up, the immunity system should be on a circadian rhythm too and be more active at night during sleep. See quotes below.

    “But the experiment raises a larger question, he said. Why would healthy people have waxing and waning levels of tumor necrosis factor in their blood? This would indicate a periodic activation of the immune throughout the night, but what might kick it off?”

    Two reports:
    1.
    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/08/03/science/mystery-of-sleep-yields-as-studies-reveal-immune-tie.html?pagewanted=all

    A COLLEGE student goes two nights without sleep to cram for exams and on the third day comes down with a cold. A night-shift employee begins working days and gets the flu. A surgery patient who is awakened four times a night in the hospital begins to recover only after going home and getting a good night’s sleep.

    Are these situations coincidental? Or do they show that sleep loss promotes illness? Despite intense interest in the question, sleep researchers have been hard pressed to show exactly how sleep influences human health and disease.

    But now a burst of findings is beginning to shed light on the ultimate purpose of sleep, and in particular on the convoluted interplay between sleep and the immune system. Experiments suggest that the immune system is somehow repaired or bolstered during sleep and that it, in turn, has a role in regulating sleep.

    In another study, healthy men and women were deprived of sleep for three days while their blood was monitored for immune system factors. Researchers expected to see a decline in immune function, yet the opposite happened. The subjects’ immune systems went into overdrive, seeming to respond to sleep deprivation as if it were an invading organism like a bacterium or virus…

    But few studies have looked at how healthy people respond to sleep loss, Dr. Dinges said. In an ambitious experiment that is now being analyzed, Dr. Dinges and his colleagues recruited 24 healthy volunteers who agreed to live in a sleep lab for one week. Dr. Dinges said that he and others expected to find a decline in immune function after sleep loss. “But from the git-go,” he said, “we realized we were on to something different.”

    The T cells and B cells that are called upon to attack specific pathogens showed no change, he said. But monocytes, granulocytes and natural killer cells — immune cells that are called into play when the body responds to an unknown invader — went sky-high. Cytokines like IL-1 also appear to be elevated, he said. Immune Cells May Induce Sleep

    The sleep-deprived subjects seem to be mounting what immunologists call a nonspecific host response, Dr. Dinges said. It is a first line of defense against disease-causing agents and means that these people should be better at fighting off colds and flu. Whether this response would endure after additional hours of sleep deprivation is not known, he said. And what it means to the brain is also not known.

    Such experiments raise the question of what role the immune system plays in normal sleep.

    2.
    It looks as if sleep research has inadvertently stumbled on something of capital importance. By depriving his animals of sleep, Krueger made them more vulnerable to infection, which stimulated their immune system, which made them more sleepy. Having noticed this, it was then possible to show that many immune proteins do, in fact, promote sleep. Taking a shot of sleep for your flu is sounding better and better, isn’t it? No needles. No pills. Sleep alone is enough to change the state of the immune system.

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  93. musea Says:

    Immunity stronger at night than during the day. This supports my sleep as bodies daily immune response.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081214191014.htm

  94. musea Says:

    This brings up who is regulating this immune system.
    That may all change what we thought we knew.

    I don’t see it as all head brain anymore.
    The ENS faces the most infection from the most dangerious entry point –
    water uptake from the gut bacteria filled colon.
    So which brain does immunity – or is it both?
    Could head brain do day patrol, and night ENS or gut brain do daily body check through that upsurge of water in REM sleep.

  95. musea Says:

    More studies and quotes

    Sleep loss also plays a roll in our ability to fight off serious health conditions. Research suggests that sleep-deprived people are at higher risk of dying from heart disease, according to Balachandran. “The more sleep loss, the higher your levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) will be,” he says. CRP is a marker of inflammation, and inflammation may play a role in heart disease.

    People who sleep less are actually more likely than their well-rested counterparts to die from all causes. “Studies show that people who get about seven hours of sleep a night have the best survival, and if we get less than six hours of sleep a night, our mortality seems to increase,” Balachandran says.During sleep, your immune system releases proteins called cytokines. These substances increase in the presence of an infection, inflammation and stress. Increased cytokines are necessary in fighting infection and regulating deeper sleep. In addition, other infection-fighting cells are reduced during periods of sleep deprivation. So, your body needs sleep to fight infectious diseases.

    During sleep, your immune system releases proteins called cytokines. These substances increase in the presence of an infection, inflammation and stress. Increased cytokines are necessary in fighting infection and regulating deeper sleep. In addition, other infection-fighting cells are reduced during periods of sleep deprivation. So, your body needs sleep to fight infectious diseases.

  96. musea Says:

    The levels of certain agents which fight disease rise during sleep and drop when we are awake.
    Moderate amounts of sleep deprivation reduce the levels of white blood cells which form part of the body’s defence system.
    Whole-body protein synthesis decreases during sleep,

  97. musea Says:

    This is long but the premise and the quotes all seem to support sleep as being a time when the immune system is active each night to help protect the body.

    Basic Premise: Sleep is 2nd half of daily digestion system.
    1. Day/wake – take in nurturing and digest it.
    2. Night/sleep – immune system takes over and patrols body at rest.

    NEW: Suggest that the LYMPH system, major part of the immune system, takes over at night, that lymph flows from groin area up through body to the neck where it joins the blood system, that this is somehow connected to NREM/REM sleep.

    “LYMPH SYSTEM DOES HOUSE CLEANING AT NIGHT”

    Now, I think the reason we sleep is to allow the lymph system to bolster the immune system, and patrol the entire body for any infection etc. Note the major source of that infection may not be from outside the body but from parasites from the intestines. See quote below.

    “We found that evolutionary increases in mammalian sleep durations are strongly associated with an enhancement of immune defences as measured by the number of immune cells circulating in peripheral blood.” ….These relationships suggest that parasite resistance has played an important role in the evolution of mammalian sleep. Species that have evolved longer sleep durations appear to be able to increase investment in their immune systems and be better protected from parasites. These results are neither predicted nor explained by conventional theories of sleep evolution, and suggest that sleep has a much wider role in disease resistance than is currently appreciated.” Parasite resistance and the adaptive significance of sleep

    Fat takes the longest to digest. This would suggest that night time is the most likely time to take the absorbed essential fatty acids into the body and distribute through the lymph system, as well as other lymph transports. (See liver cycle)

    Fat through omega fatty acids is the building blocks for eicosanoids, that plays a key roll in the immune system.

    This is likely connected to the ENS , enteric nervous system in some way ( probably through fat absorption in the small intestines).
    “About two thirds of all lymph nodes and lymphatic tissue are within or near the gastrointestinal tract.”

    The liver cycle. The liver stops making bile that digests fat at night. Wouldn’t that suggest a 24 hour cycle? During the day bile digests fats. During night the liver stops making bile, and the digested fats are distributed through the lymph system in sleep?
    The liver has a circadian rhythm. What may be important here is how it handles fat during its daily cycle. During the day the liver manufactures bile to digest fats. But at night it stops. That suggests fat digestion is over. Bile production is at its highest at 9am, and lowest at 9pm. I suggest that, at night, during sleep, the lymph system circulates those digested fats, that were digested during the day.*

    Perhaps we sleep lying down for a reason. “The lymphatic system does not have a pump to aid in its flow, instead this system is designed so that lymph only flows upward through the body traveling from the extremities (feet and hands) and upward through the body toward the neck.” – LymphNotes.com
    Lying down in sleep better allows the lymph system to move lymph up from the intestines throughout the body to the thoracic duct and right lymphatic duct that empty into the blood system. That suggests that part of sleep – the lying down, allows the lymph system to better protect the body in sleep.

    There may be other aspects of sleep that help move lymph: deep breaths, turning in sleep, yawning (maybe that’s why we yawn before sleep), sleep apnia that shuts down the muscles of the arms and legs in REM sleep, and the elevated heart rate of REM sleep.
    ” Ironically, taking blood pressure medication will make the problem worse by depressurizing the “push” on your lymph system that comes naturally from your cardiovascular system.” http://www.wellnessresources.com

    Sleep shuts down the rest of the body to conserve energy, while the lymph system patrols nightly as part of the immune system. This suggest the body’s immune system does not just react to body trauma after the fact, on a case by case basis; but actively searches it out nightly through sleep to destroy it. Immunity is part of a daily cycle.

    There are two lymph drainage areas. They are very different in size, the left is very large, the right is mostly upper right chest and shoulder.
    “Lymphatic drainage is organization into two separate and very unequal drainage areas. These are the right and left drainage areas and normally lymph does not drain across the invisible lines that separate these areas. Structures within each area carry lymph to its destination, which is to return to the circulatory system. ”
    http://www.lymphnotes.com/article.php/id/151/

    My first suggestion is that during the first NREM or deep sleep – about 70 minutes long – the lymph moves the day’s digested fat through the body to the ducts in the neck connecting the lymph system with the circulation system. REM sleep, where the heart beat increases, may be a periodic way in between deep sleep, to help move the lymph along and better move the waste from the lymphatic system out of the body.
    Then, when that REM session ends ( one cycle is about 90 minutes), the NREM/REM cycle repeats through the night. Note too that NREM periods get shorter through the night, and the REM periods get longer. This suggest the necessary fat may be getting more scarce and require more REM boosts and or at the end of night the body uses REM sleep to help expel waste.
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lymphatic_system.html

    This sleep idea may explain why there is waste fat around the belly and the thighs. It is some kind of block of the lymph system in dealing with fat/ immunity during sleep.

    This also explains obesity connection to lack of sleep – fat doesn’t have enough time to move through the lymph system during sleep and concentrates around stomach or thighs.

    Sleep has a connection to the immune system.
    “It is a common belief that we are more susceptible to infections when deprived of sleep. Consistent with this, there is increasing evidence that sleep deprivation has detrimental effects on the immune response, indicating that sleep should be considered a vital part of the immune system and that there is a reciprocal relationship between sleep and immunity. Penelope A. Bryant, John Trinder & Nigel Curtis.

    Breast milk has both water and fat – that could explain why the water fat mixture is so important to the lymph system and immunity and perhaps why infants sleep so much. The water moves the lymph and the fat is a requirement of the immunity system.

    Therefore infants sleep more, to set up an immune system. Setting up an immune system is perhaps just as important as growth right after birth.

    There may be both a cancer and heart trauma connection to the lymph/sleep/daily immune system. The lymph system protects from cancers. Lack of sleep or an unhealthy lymph system, would increase the risk. Then too the heart surge during REM would be excessive if there is sleep problems. Most heart problems happen in early morning.

    Turning in sleep may allow more easy flow for the lymph system through the side of the body that is facing up. I would suggest that most of us may sleep more on their right side which would open up the lefts side, because the left side drained by the lymph system, is so much larger.

    This quote about parts of the body going to sleep, suggests that the lymph system is active during sleep.
    “Because your lymph system likes to do house cleaning at night, if you have problems, the thoracic ducts will swell while you are sleeping (an overworked trash removal system) and press on nerves that go to your hands and arms (and to a lesser extent your legs and face). Compression on these nerves may cause your hand or arm to fall asleep while you are sleeping. Many people notice they have such a problem every now and then, which invariably is associated with a flare up of lymph troubles due to wear and tear overload. Those who have this problem more often than not have significant lymph stagnation.”
    http://www.worldwidehealth.com/health-article-A-Healthy-Lymph-System-is-Vital-for-Flu-Fighting-Immunity.html

    “We found that evolutionary increases in mammalian sleep durations are strongly associated with an enhancement of immune defences as measured by the number of immune cells circulating in peripheral blood.” – Parasite resistance and the adaptive significance of sleep.
    ——————————-
    * “After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions, synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.The cycle begins shifting around 3am, when the liver slows chemical synthesis and readies itself for bile production.
    The liver cycle shifts again around 3pm, when chemical synthesis begins to increase and bile production decreases.Thus, the liver is most prepared to aid digestion with its synthesis of bile between 9am and 9pm. ” – Living With Liver Disease.
    ——————————–
    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  98. musea Says:

    Many new ideas – these on Fat and Immune System, Obesity and Trauma.

    Fat and it’s role in the immune system.

    Fats trigger immunity
    http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20071508-16202-3.html

    Reductions in total body fat decrease humoral immunity
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1691330/

    Very Low Fat Diet May Compromise Immune Function, Increase Infection Rate in Trained Runners, UB Study Finds.
    http://www.buffalo.edu/news/2753

    Body Fat and the Immune System,
    http://www.educationireland.ie/index.php/component/content/article/48-articles/548-body-fat-and-the-immune-system
    “It’s easy to think of body fat simply as storage -useful for cushioning, insulation and holding energy reserves, but little else. But that inert picture of fat is fundamentally wrong. Increasing evidence points to fat playing an active role in the body, sending and receiving hormones and other chemical messengers. And now UCD research is shedding light on how our body fat can also act as an immune organ, which when it fails can pave the way for serious disease.”
    ___________

    This leads me to wonder if obesity reflects the body’s response to childhood trauma. Fat helps the immune system, so body says more fat needed to fight trauma – and over does the response.

    Childhood Obesity Often Linked to Trauma
    http://www.weightlosssurgerychannel.com/breaking-wls-news/childhood-obesity-often-linked-to-trauma.html/

    How Childhood Trauma Can Cause Adult Obesity
    http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951240,00.html

    Many more such studies when you google obesity + childhood trauma.

  99. musea Says:

    Heart rate, body temperature, and blood pressure all rise dramatically around 6 am. on a daily basis. Could this be the reason – during the night/sleep period the immune system fights bacteria, during the morning, wake up time, the body excretes out that waste through higher heart rate, body temperature, and blood pressure?
    See daily chart of all three here.
    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html
    There is also more REM sleep toward morning. Heart rate increases during REM sleep.
    Heart attacks are more common and more severe in the morning. (Google heart attacks + morning for studies.)

  100. musea Says:

    Immune system stronger at night:
    The immune system’s battle against invading bacteria reaches its peak
    activity at night and is lowest during the day.
    Experiments with the laboratory model organism, Drosophila
    melanogaster, reveal that the specific immune response
    known as phagocytosis oscillates with the body’s circadian rhythm,
    according to Stanford researchers who presented
    their findings at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 48th
    Annual Meeting, 13-17 December 2008 in San Francisco…

    http://esciencenews.com/sources/science.centric/2008/12/15/immunity.stronger.night.during.day

  101. musea Says:

    This post suggests

    1. that besides the higher thinking of the cerebral cortex, the head brain is more about outside the body activities – specifically
    MOVEMENT OF THE BODY, and SENSORY PERCEPTION
    And
    2. that it is not about DIGESTION. Digestion is more under the control of the Enteric Nervous System. The head brain is mostly for outside the body responses., and in many ways is mostly concerned with those mental activities. We need to look elsewhere in the nervous system for most digestion and other inner body regulation.

    This suggests a big shift in how we look at our mental processes. The head brain does not control all, but is part of a bigger multi part nervous system.

    There are 4 parts to the brain:
    The brain stem, the cerebellum, the limbic system, and the cerebral cortex. The first three are concerned with movement or the senses. The cerebral cortex, is concerned with higher mental processes.

    The brain starts with the brain stem. On top of the spinal chord is the MEDULLA OBLONGATA. This small top section of the spinal chord is supposed to control the autonomic nervous system including all breathing and heart rate, AND some sources suggest it controls digestions too!!!
    I don’t think that is reasonable. What’s reasonable for this small part of the brain stem, is that this is a relay part of the brain, like the pons above it and the spinal chord below it.

    So as it stands now, experts think that all the head brain is for senses and motor functions, except the tip of the spinal chord and that covers all the rest of the body’s activities???

    Much more likely is that the head brain is for outside the body activities and the other parts of the nervous system are more for internal body processes.

    Here are some things to consider

    1. The medulla, or top of the spinal chord is too small an area to do all that’s claimed of it. Compare the tiny medulla, with the size and complexity of the rest of the head brain.
    2. It is more likely that, like the spinal chord below it, and the pons above it, it helps relay messages to and from the head brain.

    This suggests that the enteric nervous system, or gut brain, plays a much larger role in inner body processes – perhaps even more than the head brain.

    Tom Hendricks

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  102. musea Says:

    This gives further support for the idea that the head brain does not control digestion, and that most control is in the somewhat independent ENS or enteric nervous system.

    From Wikipedia,
    The ENS is capable of autonomous functions[3] such as the coordination of reflexes; although it receives considerable innervation from the autonomic nervous system, it can and does operate independently of the brain and the spinal cord.[4] …

    … vertebrate studies show that when the vagus nerve is severed, the enteric nervous system continues to function.

    That seems to suggest that the head brain does not control digestion, and that most of the regulation of the digestion system is in the Enteric Nervous System that seems to be more independent than we used to think.
    (See my post on the idea of a conglomerate brain.)

  103. musea Says:

    The usual reason for skeletal muscle paralysis during REM sleep is that it keeps the sleeper from acting out the dream. I suggest that that is not correct, and that REM sleep more likely evolved before dreams. When I searched the idea I found that I was not the first:

    “Fred Synder was the first psychiatrist to look at dreaming from an evolutionary perspective, proposing that REM sleep came first and dreams came later. First, the brain developed the state of REM sleep and then dreams were engrafted upon REM sleep. In other words, REM sleep was available and was used to host dreams. Synder believes that dreaming evolved after a physical feature made it possible, just like language was evolved after an anatomical apparatus that was born for whatever reason (Scaruffi, 2001).”

    So what could be the reason for the paralysis? I think sleep is for the lymph system to excrete out waste and for body immunity. How would the paralysis help that?
    Because when alternating with deep sleep, the muscles take in lymph and excrete it out.

    Lymph movement:
    “The pressure gradients of the lymph through vessels comes from the skeletal muscle action, respiratory movement and contraction of the smooth muscle in vessels wall

    When your muscles contract, they squeeze the lymph vessels inside the muscles,
    emptying them. When the muscles relax, pressure on the lymphatic vessels relaxes too, and they absorb more fluid from the muscles. ”

    Muscles would contract during deep sleep. Muscles would relax in REM sleep.

  104. musea Says:

    This study from Science Daily strengthens the argument that the
    biggest threat to the body is from the bacteria in the intestines.
    I go further and say that the main body protection is not the head
    brain. The ENS or enteric nervous system seems to play a major
    part in all aspects of protection from intestines bacteria, as well as
    food in and waste out, plus possibly sleep and immunity.
    I tend to think because the ENS protects the body from gut bacteria,
    that it is the main part of the nervous system for all body
    protection.

    http://tinyurl.com/79k5oj8

    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV
    paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  105. musea Says:

    JHC,

    Breast feeding boosters the immune system.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-11417490

    THIS IS ONLY MY SPECULATION FOR SURE but here goes:

    Children that are not breast fed or not breast fed enough are more liable to infection.
    When that happens I think that that trauma, repressed and hidden from the head brain from childhood on – still has a major impact.

    The impact is so strong that the will of the head brain and the will of the gut brain are at odds.

    This is clear if you want to do something but your gut feeling is opposite, or if you feel one way, but part of you feels the other way.

    Somehow the repressed trauma of infant infection in the ENS, has to be brought to the surface. Somehow the ENS has to be allowed to make conscious the trauma it had in infancy from infections – infections mostly in the colon. Somehow the head brain must consciously say, that the ENS had trauma, and now it is important to bring it to the surface, understand why it happened and resolve it.

    Then the body can begin to resolve the two sides – the trauma from bacteria in the ENS in infancy that was never resolved or expressed, and the reasoning from the head brain that doesn’t understand the ENS.

  106. musea Says:

    There may be the same trauma about not enough food in in infancy for infants that are not breast fed. So that suggests two main traumas one of food in trauma, and the other of waste out trauma.

  107. musea Says:

    This article ties in and supports many of my ideas:
    1. sleep is connected to immune system
    2. bulk of immune is connected to infection from the gastrointestinal tract
    3. fear/ depression is involved – not from external causes but from infection fighting.

    Quote:
    Most of the genetic variations that have been linked to depression turn out to affect the function of the immune system,” Miller says. “This led us to rethink why depression seems to stay embedded in the genome.”

    “The basic idea is that depression and the genes that promote it were very adaptive for helping people-especially young children-not die of infection in the ancestral environment, even if those same behaviors are not helpful in our relationships with other people,” Raison says.

    Infection was the major cause of death in humans’ early history, so surviving infection was a key determinant in whether someone was able to pass on his or her genes.

    The authors propose that evolution and genetics have bound together depressive symptoms and physiological responses that were selected on the basis of reducing mortality from infection. Fever, fatigue/inactivity, social avoidance and anorexia can all be seen as adaptive behaviors in light of the need to contain infection, they write.

    The theory provides a new explanation for why stress is a risk factor for depression. The link between stress and depression can be seen as the byproduct of a process that preactivates the immune system in anticipation of a wound, they write.

    Similarly, a disruption of sleep patterns can be seen in both mood disorders and when the immune system is activated. This may come from our ancestors’ need to stay on alert to fend off predators after injury, Miller says.

    http://www.interndaily.com/reports/Depression_Evolutionary_byproduct_of_the_ability_to_fight_infection_999.html

  108. musea Says:

    Which came first, the head brain or the ENS, enteric nervous system,
    or gut brain?
    That could help determine if paralysis during sleep preceded dreams.
    This intro to the ENS seems to suggest that the digestion brain came
    before the head brain.
    I contend that muscle paralysis probably preceded the head brain
    dreams.

    Quote on the ENS (downstairs brain) from http://www.whyfiles.org/026fear/physio1.html

    When animals began doing more than just eating (say choosing a good
    wine to complement dinner), they evolved that better-known brain in
    the skull. But instead of replacing the downstairs brain, the upstairs
    brain was hooked up to it. And it turns out that both brains originate
    from a structure called the neural crest, which appears and divides
    during fetal development to form both thinking machines.
    The enteric nervous system, present in all vertebrates (defined), has
    these functions: to regulate the normal (digestive) activity of the
    digestive system and prepare it for whatever its future may hold:
    whether it be sampling lobster thermidor or dodging a headlong charge
    from the king of the tigers.
    With a population of 100 million nerves, the enteric nervous system is
    as complex as the better studied spinal cord. And like the spinal
    cord, it transmits and processes messages…
    And while this nervous system isn’t protected by a skull, many of its
    structures and chemicals parallel those of the mainframe brain. It has
    sensory and motor neurons, information processing circuits, and the
    glial cells (defined). It uses the major neurotransmitters: dopamine,
    serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide and norepinephrine. It even has
    benzodiazepines, chemicals of the family of psychoactive drugs that
    includes Valium and Xanax.
    Please explain. Sorry. Can’t. Nobody knows. But it’s an indication of
    the complexity of the gut-brain, and of the number of questions
    remaining to be answered about it.

  109. musea Says:

    This article
    http://www.livescience.com/18565-life-building-blocks-chemical-evolution.html

    Supports the ideas that
    1.UV played a part in the origin. and
    2. Life became complex to survive – not to replicate or metabolize or
    to get to us.

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV
    paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  110. musea Says:

    Be some of the first to know. Why do we sleep? Sleep= immunity. This study supports that.

    We found that evolutionary increases in mammalian sleep durations are strongly associated with an enhancement of immune defences as measured by the number of immune cells circulating in peripheral blood. This appeared to be a generalized relationship that could be independently detected in 4 of the 5 immune cell types and in both of the main sleep phases. Importantly, no comparable relationships occur in related physiological systems that do not serve an immune function. Consistent with an influence of sleep on immune investment, mammalian species that sleep for longer periods also had substantially reduced levels of parasitic infection.

    These relationships suggest that parasite resistance has played an important role in the evolution of mammalian sleep. Species that have evolved longer sleep durations appear to be able to increase investment in their immune systems and be better protected from parasites. These results are neither predicted nor explained by conventional theories of sleep evolution, and suggest that sleep has a much wider role in disease resistance than is currently appreciated.
    http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/9/7

  111. musea Says:

    Here’s more on circadian rhythms, and building blocks

    This quote from this new study, Circadian Rhythms Have Profound Influence On Metabolic Output
    http://tinyurl.com/89ebtcv

    “By analyzing the hundreds of metabolic products present in the liver, researchers with the UC Irvine Center for Epigenetics & Metabolism have discovered that circadian rhythms — our own body clock — greatly control the production of such key building blocks as amino acids, carbohydrates and lipids.”

    This supports my idea that there is a strong day/night cycle, that day is for taking in and digesting nurturing and that night sleep is key to mostly immune processes, and that they circadian rhythm in the liver may be the key to better understanding al this.

  112. musea Says:

    Excerpt from a discussion on Panspermia, the idea that life came from space and did not start here.
    Don’t forget for life to get to planet earth it has to go through the earth’s atmosphere – look what that atmosphere does to solid rock falling from the sky. I think the real reason for panspermia, is that most origin of life scenarios are built on chemical flukes. Which really have very little chance of surviving. So we transfer our origins to somewhere else. As if the fluke there makes more sense. Life was not a chemical fluke, it was not a one time event with 5 magic taps from a chemistry wand (like most OOL scenarios). It was just the opposite – the most stable reaction to that environment. Analogy – life has lasted 4 billion years in pretty much the same form. That can not be said for the atmosphere (reducing then) the seas (sterilized through thermal vents) or the earth (plate tectonics). Thus life is not a fluke, but so stable that it outlasted the earth, sky, and sea it started from. Strange for me that most scientists investigating this believe so strongly in natural selection, but throw that out the window when it comes to the origin. It too was chemical selection on what best survived that environment. It had nothing to do with a one time chemistry that started up and that somehow wants to get to us! Perhaps I went on too long on this thread, but I think this specific type of 5 magic taps of a chemistry wand is the wrong way to go. And it leads nowhere.

  113. musea Says:

    Could memory evolve from adaptive immunity?

    This quote from http://www.tcells.org/scientific/memory/

    Adaptive immunity is said to have memory because the immune system learns. In this way we gain life-long immunity to infections such as mumps or chicken pox. T-cells constitute a highly evolved arm of the adaptive immune system that is able to distinguish between pathogens and is capable of evolving or adapting during the lifetime of an individual such that immunity becomes better with each successive exposure to pathogen. This is because, following infection, some of the activated T-cells become memory cells that exist in a state of readiness and have the ability to rapidly expand and fight off recurrence of the same disease. In a way, these cells learn from their experience of fighting a particular infection and so can use the most effective strategy to manage the same infection later. This ability to remember and learn is exploited during the process of vaccination.

  114. musea Says:

    There are a lot of new studies about the impact of gut flora on human health.
    But most of these studies suggest that these microbes are active, but the human immune and digestive system is passive.

    But how can that be? Millions of years of evolution would set up an arms race between the negative bacteria and the human gut. And it would set up symbiotic systems between the positive or neutral bacteria and the human gut.

    Instead of a passive human digestive system, we should likely find one that is highly evolved to not only support good bacteria, but to defend itself from negative bacteria.

    Now we must find out how the intestinal tract does all this.

    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

    Catabolic and Anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend!
    ———————–
    This health hypothesis and all these posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes..
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO

    Catabolic and Anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend!

  115. musea Says:

    “UV irradiation was a key component in the production of complex organic molecules in the early solar system. ”

    This article suggests that the creation of organic compounds, far from being a fluke event, are a common aspect of primordial solar systems.
    It also suggests that UV played a key part. Both of these ideas are ones that I’ve suggested before.

    Science Daily Article
    http://tinyurl.com/74n5faa
    My article on UV
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html

    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  116. musea Says:

    Perhaps everything is upside down, and the nervous system works the other way around? We think the head brain directs the body. But is that fact or just an assumption? If it’s the other way around, we may have a big shift in understanding how the body works.

    “Scientists were shocked to learn that about 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus, carry information from the gut to the brain and not the other way around. ”

    Perhaps the ENS, enteric nervous system directs the rest of the body through the vagus nerve instead of the head brain directing the ENS and the rest of the body through the vagus nerve. Perhaps not only digestion, but some aspects of heart rate (changing rate after eating), etc. is more and more regulated by the ENS, to best suit the digestive system. Then the head brain overrides that in day time emergencies.

    Could that be? Could we have it all backwards? Do gut feelings trump head reasoning? Does the more ancient digestive system, trump the later developed head brain?

    Here are some quotes from assorted articles:

    ENS basics:
    The enteric brain is ancient in evolutionary terms and probably antedates the CNS. It has been discovered in a sea cucumber. Sea cucumbers belong to the echinoderms, a sister phylum to our phylum, the chordates. It was believed that the nervous system of echinoderms consisted of only a ring of nervous tissue but recent research shows that echinoderms have a sophisticated enteric nervous system.

    ENS works independently from CNS
    Although the central nervous system( CNS) and ENS are connected by the vagus nerve, they continue to operate independently when the nerve is severed.

    ENS full of brain chemicals
    Nearly every chemical that controls the brain is also located in the stomach region, including hormones and neurotransmitters such as Serotonin, Dopamine, Glutamate, GABA and Norepinephrine. The gut contains 100 million neurons – more than the spinal cord. But there are also two-dozen small brain proteins; major cells of the immune system; one class of the body’s natural opiates; and native benzodiazepines. The gut, known as the enteric nervous system, is located in sheaths of tissue lining the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon, and plays a key role in human emotions. But few know the enteric nervous system exists, and therefore gut health is often overlooked. Symptoms from the two brains can get confused, and just as the brain can upset the gut, the gut can also upset the brain.

    Vagas Nerve basics:
    The vagus nerve helps to regulate the heart beat, control muscle movement, keep a person breathing, and to transmit a variety of chemicals through the body. It is also responsible for keeping the digestive tract in working order, contracting the muscles of the stomach and intestines to help process food, and sending back information about what is being digested and what the body is getting out of it. (Wisegeek)

    (Comment: could it be the other way around? ENS directs the vagas nerve and what it regulates?)

    Digestive Brain came first
    When animals were first evolving, their main concern was physical sustenance and so the first nerves to develop were those in the digestive track. As life evolved further, animals required a more complex brain, but the gut’s nervous system was too important to be marginalized. Nature thus maintained the enteric nervous system independent of the central nervous system in the brain and spinal cord. Both brains originate during fetal development from tissues called the neural crest. This structure divides to form the two brains, loosely connected by a group of only a few thousand nerve fibers called the vagus nerve.

    ENS autonomy
    The enteric nervous system, the lesser-know of the two brains, manages the gastrointestinal tract without the assistance of the cranial brain (3). It regulates the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon by mixing food with digestive enzymes and pushing food along the tract. It also helps control the absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream and protects the body against harmful bacteria and toxins that may enter with food (2). The autonomy of the ENS has great advantages. Its proximity to the structures it controls provides “second-to-second control” and eliminates the need for a thick cable of nerves linking it to the cranial brain (1).

    Comment: But perhaps autonomy is not strong enough. Perhaps the ENS instigates the changes as much or even more than the head brain.

    Tom
    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and
    anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive
    processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes do not blend
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO (bio summary)

  117. musea Says:

    Seems there is a 90-120 minute cycle in the digestive tract that keeps coming up and up.
    I wonder what significance this can have to health?

    Here are some assorted quotes:

    The intestines undergo what is called a “cleansing wave” every 90 to 120 minutes when fasting which removes wastes from the small intestine.

    It normally takes about 90-120 minutes for the first part of a meal we have eaten to reach the large intestine, and the last portion of the meal may not reach the large intestine for five hours.

    Between meals, the intestine shows cycles of activity that repeat about every 90-120 minutes. The cycle consists of a short period of no contractions (Phase I), followed by a long period of unsynchronized contractions that appear similar to the fed pattern (Phase II), and then a burst of strong, regular contractions that move down the intestine in a peristaltic fashion (Phase III). Phase III represents a continuation of the “housekeeper waves” that start in the stomach; its function is to sweep undigested food particles and bacteria out of the small intestine and into the large intestine.

    About 70 to 90 minutes after falling asleep, you enter REM sleep, where dreaming occurs.

    During sleep, people experience repeated cycles of NREM and REM sleep, beginning with an NREM phase. This cycle lasts approximately 90 to 110 minutes and is repeated four to six times per night.

    During sleep the brain in the gut produces ninety minutes of slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, cycles that correspond to the cycles of deep sleep and REM. When the brain is in deep sleep, the gut quiets down (there is ‘decreased small intestinal motility”), whereas REM has “immediate stimulatory effects on colonic motility” like those that occur with arousals and waking.

    During sleep, the head’s brain produces 90-minute cycles of slow wave sleep, followed by periods of rapid eye movement (REM) where dreams occur. During the night, when it is empty, the gut’s brain produces 90-minute slow wave muscle contractions, followed by short bursts of rapid muscle movement. These two brains are linked even in sleep.

  118. musea Says:

    FACT one
    The lymphatic system also helps defend the body against invasion by disease-causing agents such as viruses, bacteria, or fungi. Harmful foreign materials are filtered out by small masses of tissue called lymph nodes that lie along the network of lymphatic vessels. These nodes house lymphocytes (white blood cells), some of which produce antibodies, special proteins that fight off infection. They also stop infections from spreading through the body by trapping disease-causing germs and destroying them.

    FACT two
    Sanford researchers showed just how much stronger our immune system is at night by infecting flies with two strains of bacteria – but some of those flies were infected during the day. Those that got sick during the night were more likely to survive than those getting sick during the day.

    FACT three
    The lymphatic system does not have a pump to aid in its flow, instead this system is designed so that lymph only flows upward through the body traveling from the extremities (feet and hands) and upward through the body toward the neck.

    POiINT
    Does that mean that the lymph system works more at night?
    (Remember in sleep we are laying down., that would make it easier to circulate the lymph wouldn’t it?)
    Your lymphatic fluid is the fluid between every cell of your body. It helps remove large particles of trash from your body by flowing through a system of “rivers” and lymph glands, ending at either of two major thoracic ducts by your upper shoulders. This is why fluid heads towards your neck as you are sleeping. It is the major house cleaning time of your body and your body is simply trying to “take out the trash.” Of course, exactly how you feel when you wake up in the morning is indicative of how well of a job you did. The same lymph system is also crucial for how your body absorbs and transports dietary fat, and as a result, is also subject to toxic overload from your own digestive tract.

  119. musea Says:

    More on our circadian liver – that may be the key to a lot of discoveries in health.

    > The liver cycle. The liver stops making bile that digests fat at
    > night. Wouldn’t that suggest a 24 hour cycle? During the day bile
    > digests fats. During night the liver stops making bile, and the
    > digested fats are distributed through the lymph system in sleep?
    > The liver has a circadian rhythm. What may be important here is how it
    > handles fat during its daily cycle. During the day the liver
    > manufactures bile to digest fats. But at night it stops. That suggests
    > fat digestion is over. Bile production is at its highest at 9am, and
    > lowest at 9pm. I suggest that, at night, during sleep, the lymph
    > system circulates those digested fats, that were digested during the
    > day.*

    Here’s more on the liver circadian rhythm. I think this may be a key clue to
    understanding sleep, digestion, ENS, immune system and more. We’ve got
    to ask why is this cycle here? What does it have to do with sleep etc.?

    During the day, humans burn glucose, derived from the food we eat. This is the fuel that supplies the muscles and other parts of the body expending energy. At night, when we sleep, we revert to stored fat as a source of very dependable but slowly released energy.
    http://tinyurl.com/7y2rpxs

  120. musea Says:

    This story supports some of my speculations on the ENS, or enteric nervous system – specifically that the real danger to the body may not be from people or relationships, but more from bacteria in the digestive system.
    I go much further suggesting that the ENS is the main brain for inside the body health, while the head brain is more for sense perception, movement, and coordinating all the nervous system.

    http://www.wbez.org/blog/clever-apes/2012-01-17/clever-apes-24-gut-feelings-95602
    Quote
    It’s still pretty speculative, but gut leakiness has now been linked with a bunch of other neurological diseases. In general, the gut and the trillions of bacteria that live there are turning up as strong candidates to account for correlations that have eluded explanation.

  121. musea Says:

    Biology now seems to be most centered on two things: replication – with genes, DNA etc.. – and biology processes on the molecular level.

    But replication is just one of two main life processes – the other being metabolism. That’s just as important as replication.

    And many different properties emerge on levels higher than the molecular level. Not all discoveries can be found at the molecular level.

    Perhaps it’s time to shift some of the attention to these two other aspects of life: metabolic processes, and emerging properties and processes that are not on the molecular level.

    When I look at metabolism instead of replication, I see two main ways of evolution – either life evolves through catabolic processes, or anabolic processes. I think that catabolic and anabolic processes evolve, but they do not blend. That could lead to important discoveries of why the body has two main systems that are so different but somehow work together: one that breaks down waste (catabolic) and the other that builds up the body (anabolic).

    Also when I look beyond the molecular level, my main interest now is in the Enteric Nervous System. It seems to play a bigger part in human health than we thought. It may be the main ‘brain’ for not only digestion and getting waste out, but almost all body processes. Perhaps it’s time to rethink the role of not only the ENS, but the head brain as well.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  122. musea Says:

    Traumatic events happen every day. The first step in resolving them is to be consciously aware of them. A nights sleep seems to help too. That two part process of 1 being conscious of the trauma*, and 2 Sleep, helping to resolve the trauma; was not available during infancy. We were not conscious of trauma between birth and the age of 3,4, or 5 when we develop memory. So we could not resolve the trauma during that time like we can as adults.

    My suggestion is that this hidden and unresolved infant trauma may unconsciously influence our behavior without us knowing it. It’s our ‘gut’ reaction to stress – that inner drive or behavior we are not consciously aware of.

    Second the basic trauma may be lack of nurturing*. That may lead to all kinds of health problems, including both excess weight problems, and eating disorders. It may also lead to many chronic ailments and diseases we have in later life. This may also include not only some cancers, and heart stress, but most auto immune diseases.

    if this is so, then it explains the strong resistance to change in all of us, even when that change seems so much more healthy. We have, over a life time, set up defenses to offset that hidden infant nurturing trauma.

    Major change in diet, or behavior, would first break down those defenses. We rebel against that change. Why? We need those defenses until we can resolve the hidden nurturing trauma. Our body is right to rebel against any change, no matter how healthy it seems on the surface – at least until the underlying nurturing trauma is solved.

    Then too trying to change the body’s defense system gets a physical reaction from our bodies. The body responds with more trauma and upset. That suggests that any tampering with our defense system, without first resolving the underlying nurturing trauma, would lead to added ailments and problems. That may be why we have auto immune diseases. So called well intentioned, change for the better only makes everything worse.

    These ideas could change our ideas about therapy. First I would suggest that we treat the hidden and unconscious infant nurturing trauma. We must resolve that underlying trauma before we can resolve anything else.

    The first and major step to do that is by bringing that trauma to the conscious mind. Then resolving it.

    Then and only then, after we have ended this hidden nurturing trauma in childhood, can we change our defense system, and possibly cure our hidden ailments, end auto immune responses, etc.
    ——————————
    *Consciousness may have evolved to help resolve trauma among other advantages.
    **The key to nurturing may be the biological need for breast milk. The trauma may be a pattern set up in infancy, in the ENS, or enteric nervous system.

  123. musea Says:

    This study supports my ideas and suggests that there is a circadian cycle to our digestion system and that WHEN you eat makes a difference too.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120517132057.htm

  124. musea Says:

    Check out the concentration of – Immunologic Components in Human Milk – chart. Note the increase of Lysozyme, peaking from 6-15 months. If true why would the medic al profession recommend ending breastfeeding at 6 months before the peak period? That would miss all the Lysozyme benefits.
    Definition Lysozyme, ” an enzyme with antiseptic actions that destroys some foreign organisms. It is found in granulocytic and monocytic blood cells and is normally present in saliva, sweat, breast milk, and tears.”
    http://kellymom.com/nutrition/milk/immunefactors/

  125. musea Says:

    Weight trauma? Here’s some ideas:

    The main culprit seems to be carbs and refined sugar (and excess protein and fat). It’s very difficult to gain weight on fruits and green vegetables.
    But why the inner drive that craves carbs and sugar?

    There seems to be a correlation between those who are not breast fed and obesity. That may be the big underlying cause of all eating problems – a lack of one full year of breast feeding.

    Also these problems:
    The lack of sleep and obesity connection. There is more pain in those who are obese connection. And there seems to be a connection between when you eat and obesity.
    I seldom see those comments made. The studies for all of these are pretty strong.

    Three things that may help (after the unconscious breast feeding trauma is solved – and again that is the big unconscious drive for all eating problems)

    1. Pull back on the amount of carbs you eat.
    2. Never eat after dark – give your digestion system enough to digest and switch over to sleep mode.
    3. Get enough sleep.

  126. musea Says:

    We know that there is a direct connection between amount of sleep and development of immune system in mammals.
    We know fat takes the longest to digest.
    We know the liver, that produces bile to digest fats, has a circadian rhythm that switches over at night from bile production to synthesizing complex chemicals and processes toxins.
    We know that fat is connected to the lymph system,
    We know that too much or too little fat affects the immune system.

    Could sleep be time when the immune system is most active, and a part of that is
    the distribution of fats – that took most of the day to digest?
    Therefore we sleep to distribute digested fats, that support the immune system?
    Here are some studies:

    FAT AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
    http://www.ucd.ie/ucdtoday/2009/04_APRIL/documents/7.pdf

    t’s easy to think of body fat simply as storage useful for cushioning, insulation and holding energy reserves, but little else. But that inert picture of fat is fundamentally wrong. Increasing evidence point to fat playing an active role in the body sending and receiving hormones and other chemical messengers.
    UCD research is shedding light on how our body fat can also act as an immune organ, which when it fails can pave the way for serious disease.

    Obese people have a hugely increased risk of cancer, the get more infections, they take longer to heal after a burn or a cut and they need longer treatments with antibiotics than a lean person does. So it suggests that the immune system is involved.

    FAT TOO MUCH OR TOO LITTLE – BOTH HURT THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
    http://www.eufic.org/article/en/artid/nutrition-immune-system/

    Reducing fat in the diet is important for weight control but it also seems to influence how well the immune system works. Diets that are high in fat seem to depress the immune response and thus increase the risk of infections. Reducing fat content in the diet can increase immune activity. This might not just affect infections but could also strengthen the type of immune cells, which can fight tumour cells. However, it is not just the amount of fat that is important but also its origin. It is important to include oily fish, nuts, soy or linseed oil in your diet because we need the right balance of different fatty acids.

    FAT AND THE IMMUNE SYSTEM
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Scientists-Find-How-Fat-Affects-the-Immune-System-126158.shtml

    Obesity is known to be one of the main causes why people begin to develop a host of other conditions and also become vulnerable to the effects of external pathogens. For instance, those with too many extra pounds may suffer from diabetes, heart conditions, a lack of physical condition and muscle tone, as well as catch the new swine flu faster than people of normal weight. Researchers have known for some time that all the extra fat inside these people forces their immune system to work harder, producing inflammation.

    WHAT FAT DOES – THIS LIST SEEMS SIMILAR TO WHY WE SLEEP.

    Here is a list of what fat does. Lots of these points seem to be why we sleep too.
    http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/family-nutrition/facts-about-fats/why-you-need-fats

    Fats provide energy.
    Fats build healthy cells.
    Fats build brains.
    Fats help the body use vitamins.
    Fats make hormones.
    Fat provides healthier skin.
    Fat forms a protective cushion for your organs.

  127. musea Says:

    Summary

    There are two brain systems that can work independently. The head brain, and the ENS or enteric nervous system, or digestion brain.
    Consciousness in the head brain, seems to be a major part of resolving any health trauma. (Though we don’t know why.)
    There is a period in infancy from birth to the age of 3-5, when we do not have head brain consciousness, which would include memory. (see study url below)
    There is often pre conscious trauma in the ENS or enteric nervous system, or digestion brain, in infancy, connected to digestion issues like breast milk nurturing and gut infection.
    This pre consciousness trauma is never brought to consciousness and never resolved because it occurs before our head brain becomes conscious.
    This pre consciousness trauma may continue to affect our lives, leading to auto immune response to health problems, and an excess response to any problem.
    —————————
    This sight has an overview for infant amnesia
    http://social.jrank.org/pages/392/Memory-Developmental-Onset-Memory.html

    The head brain becomes conscious with memories, around 3- 5 years of age.
    The enteric nervous system or digestion brain system, is active from birth on.
    Somehow being conscious of trauma helps resolve it. But only our head brain has consciousness and it doesn’t have consciousness till 3-5 years.
    There is a period from birth till head brain consciousness, where trauma occurs and the head brain is not conscious of it. This trauma is not resolved.
    This trauma is remembered by the ENS. It seems to be limited to trauma connected to digestion issues and waste out issues such as nurturing or infection.
    I suggest that this infant trauma that is never brought to consciousness, continues to cause problems.
    The unresolved infant digestion trauma usually centers around enough breast milk/nurturing, weaning, enough sleep, gut infection, waste out trauma, etc.
    When any adult event triggers these repressed infant traumas, they trigger an excess response. The response is not only to the trigger event, but also to the hidden infant digestion trauma that has never been resolved.
    This may lead to over response or auto immune problems. Thus unresolved infant digestion trauma may be the cause of auto immune response, or any excess response to any event that triggers that infant digestion trauma.

    Tom Hendricks
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  128. musea Says:

    Weaning off breast milk, may be a key development for a child. It helps him
    ‘wean’ himself from not only his mother’s milk but anyone, become independent, and set up a system to recover from loss. Note the idea of separation anxiety in infants.

    Those never breast fed, are never weaned, and may have dependency problems. They may not have the biological basis for a positive response to trauma.
    First an infant has to respond to loss of breast milk trauma. Then as adults we have to respond to loss of breast milk type nurturing (loss of money, home, loved one, etc.) Weaning seems to give a biological basis to dealing with later trauma.

  129. musea Says:

    Psychology is studying the wrong brain.

    The science of the brain may be covering the wrong brain. More and more I see the head brain as involved with senses and movement. Those are ways the human deals with the outside world – senses of what is going on, and movement toward nurturing and away from danger. What the head brain does not seem to cover as much as we think, is issues of inside the body. Some say a small part of the brain stem does all this. But note it is sandwiched between other sections that RELAY messages from the body to the head brain. Try to find what part of the head brain rules the body processes – you’ll be surprised how hard that is.

    The ENS, or enteric nervous system or digestion brain, seems to be the key component of the nervous system connected to digestion and maybe more inside the body processes. Unlike the head brain that only becomes conscious 3-5 years after birth, the ENS is conscious from birth. It is most likely a more ancient part of the nervous system as well.

    Two biological events in infancy may be key developments worth the study of psychology.
    1. Breast feeding – this sets up the digestion system. A child is fed enough, or he is denied breast feeding and it’s benefits, and is ‘always hungry’. That leads to trauma from then on.
    2. Weaning – this sets up the switch from breast milk to solids. But it is also helps the child ‘wean’ himself from not only his mother’s milk but anyone or anything. Then he can become independent, and set up a system or process to recover from loss. Note the idea of separation anxiety in infants. Those infants that are never breast fed, are never weaned, and may have dependency problems. They may not have the biological basis for a positive response to trauma.
    First an infant has to respond to loss of breast milk trauma. Then as adults we have to respond to loss of breast milk type nurturing (loss of money, home, loved one, etc.) Weaning seems to give a biological basis to dealing with later trauma.

    Both events, breast feeding or the lack of it, and weaning with it’s forced trauma, may be key events that lead to much human behavior – specially when any current stress triggers these more basic subconscious traumas.

    Thus psychology as a science should be studying, not the head brain alone, but also the ENS. Here there is a biological cause to the more basic traumas connected to breast feeding and weaning. These in turn may be the key problems to solve in human behavior. Thus psychology is probably studying the wrong brain or at least not studying all the nervous system.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes do not blend

  130. musea Says:

    Here’s some points connected to problems of weight loss.
    The over riding problem with weight is lack of breast feeding for one year in childhood. There has been a drop in rates of breast feeding, since the introduction of infant formula.
    Google obesity and breast feeding for many many many studies.

    BUT if you were unlucky enough not to be breast fed for one year – and many – mostly the poor – were not; here are 3 tips that all have studies to support them.
    1. Pull back on carbs. See study: Cutting Carbs Two Days a Week Is Better than Full-Time Dieting
    2. Never eat when it’s dark. Give your body time to digest before sleep. See study: When You Eat Matters, Not Just What You Eat
    3. Get more sleep. See studies on obesity and lack of sleep.

    “Before 1900, most mothers breastfed their infants. Breastfeeding rates declined sharply worldwide after 1920, when evaporated cow’s milk and infant formula became widely available. These were promoted as being more convenient for mothers and more nutritious than human milk. Breast feeding rates began rising again in the late 1950s and early 1960s.” – faqs.org

  131. musea Says:

    Separation anxiety in children may be a reflection of a much more biological trauma.
    When children are weaned off breast milk they must learn how to process other foods. There is probably biological trauma connected to this switch from breast milk to solids in the intestinal tract.
    I think this loss of breast milk in the gut, is the underlying cause of separation anxiety.
    Here is a quote that defines separation anxiety.
    Separation anxiety: “From 8 – 14 months, children often become frightened when they meet new people or visit new places. They recognize their parents as familiar and safe. When separated from their parents, particularly when away from home, they feel threatened and unsafe.” – Pub Med Health.
    Note that the time period of separation anxiety fits the time period when weaning often occurs.

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  132. musea Says:

    (See above comment) I’d like to go further and ad the other childhood phase, stranger anxiety. This seems to occur sometime later than separation anxiety.
    I suggest this too has a biological basis.
    The real stranger anxiety is in the gut, the stranger is the strange food, or first solids that are replacing breast milk. Thus stranger anxiety is really trauma from weaning and introducing foods other than breast milk.

  133. musea Says:

    What in the body would be the biological equivalent of ‘money’.

    “The fat deposits could be viewed as a carbohydrate bank, where deposits and withdrawals are made as necessary.” rawfoodexplained.com

    “Even if no fat is eaten, the body can manufacture most of its fatty acids from fruit and vegetable sugars. There are three fatty acids, however, that the body is said to be unable to synthesize. These are called the essential fatty acids.” rawfoodexplained.com

    I think it would be FAT, a resource that may have been somewhat scarce to our ancestors. Also fat, unlike lipids, and carbohydrates can be stored (see below).
    I tend to think fats (specially the essential fatty acids) come from types of food, that are the most difficult, not only to get, but to digest.

    My hypothesis is that they seem to be connected to sleep and immunity which may be why we sleep. (Related study: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/9/7 )
    That would suggest that fats are needed for protection and infection fighting during sleep, as well as all it’s other purposes (see below).

    They may be a key part of a healthy puberty too. “The adrenal and sex hormones seem to require the presence of these fatty acids for their manufacture.”

    Would this carry over to human social problems of greed or dependency trauma? Could greed and neediness in humans have a biological basis, that comes from not enough needed fat in the diet of the infant? (either not breast fed, or not enough fat after weaning).
    ——————————————————–

    FAT STORAGE “Fat is used in the body in four main ways: As a source of heat and energy; As padding and insulation for the organs and nerves; As a regulator for the fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K); and As a source of the essential fatty acids.

    GLUCOSE STORAGE “However, if there is excessive glucose in the body and the muscle and liver tissues have made its maximal amount of glycogen, the excess glucose is converted to FAT!”

    “When an excess of carbohydrates is eaten, it is converted by the body into FAT and stored.”

    PROTEIN STORAGE “Since excess protein cannot be stored in the body, all protein has to be broken down and either used or sent through the kidneys and liver to be excreted from the body.”

    “The problem is that too much protein is stored in fat cells or discarded through urine. So yes, too much protein can turn into FAT! ”
    (Assorted quotes from the net.)

    Tom Hendricks
    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  134. musea Says:

    STRANGER ANXIETY
    Stranger anxiety in children may be a reflection of a biological trauma in the digestion system. This may come from digesting first foods during weaning, and dealing with first infections from gut flora.

    When children are weaned off breast milk, they must learn how to process other foods. There may be some anxiety in the body dealing with foods other than breast milk.

    There may also be anxiety in the body dealing with first infections from gut flora that comes with these first foods. Digesting these new foods, and dealing with these first infections from gut flora may be the cause of stranger anxiety. The real “stranger” the child is afraid of is 1. these new foods, and 2. infection causing; bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Here is a quote that defines stranger anxiety.

    Stranger anxiety: “Stranger anxiety is fear or wariness of people with whom a child is not familiar.” “When stranger anxiety begins can vary widely. Some babies show signs of wariness as early as 4 months. On average, though, it begins at about 8 months, according to the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development…. At about 12 months, as cognitive and physical skills advance, the anxiety can become very apparent, with the child running to a caregiver and begging to be held when a stranger approaches. On average, the anxiety subsides by age 18 months. ”

    Note that stranger anxiety seems to occur later than separation anxiety. This suggests that first comes separation anxiety (separation from breast milk and switch to solids); then stranger anxiety (reaction to new foods and first infections).

  135. musea Says:

    Why store fats? (see reply two up).

    Why do we store fat in our bodies? Seems like a lot of wasted work and energy just to then pack it into storage?
    Fats are the most difficult and time consuming food to digest.
    When we have enough we store the rest.
    Excess storage of fat leads to health problems of the obese.

    Why do all that? Wouldn’t it be easier to stop digesting and absorbing fat when we get the amount we need? Then let the undigested fat be excreted out as waste.
    Why go to all that trouble to store fat we don’t use?

    Tom
    BIO:
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  136. musea Says:

    Mark Schaller suggests fears of Infection may Influence our social Life.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/sex-murder-and-the-meaning-life/201106/do-unconscious-fears-infection-influence-your-social-lif

    I suggest this biological basis to that:

    Perhaps our fear of infection is not a conscious head-brain idea as much as an unconscious biological fear based in the ENS or enteric nervous system from infancy.

    Infants go through a separation anxiety and a stranger anxiety. Both separation anxiety and stranger anxiety may be outward signs of a more basic biological fear of separation from breast milk (separation anxiety), and fear of the first foods that replaces it (stranger anxiety). Here are two posts:

    STRANGER ANXIETY
    Stranger anxiety in children may be a reflection of a biological trauma in the digestion system. This may come from digesting first foods during weaning, and dealing with first infections from gut flora.

    When children are weaned off breast milk, they must learn how to process other foods. There may be some anxiety in the body dealing with foods other than breast milk.

    There may also be anxiety in the body dealing with first infections from gut flora that comes with these first foods. Digesting these new foods, and dealing with these first infections from gut flora may be the cause of stranger anxiety. The real “stranger” the child is afraid of is 1. these new foods, and 2. infection causing; bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Here is a quote that defines stranger anxiety.

    Stranger anxiety: “Stranger anxiety is fear or wariness of people with whom a child is not familiar.” “When stranger anxiety begins can vary widely. Some babies show signs of wariness as early as 4 months. On average, though, it begins at about 8 months, according to the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development…. At about 12 months, as cognitive and physical skills advance, the anxiety can become very apparent, with the child running to a caregiver and begging to be held when a stranger approaches. On average, the anxiety subsides by age 18 months. ”

    Note that stranger anxiety seems to occur later than separation anxiety. This suggests that first comes separation anxiety (separation from breast milk and switch to solids); then stranger anxiety (reaction to new foods and first infections).

    SEPARATION ANXIETY
    Separation anxiety in children may be a reflection of a much more biological trauma.
    When children are weaned off breast milk they must learn how to process other foods. There is probably biological trauma connected to this switch from breast milk to solids in the intestinal tract.
    I think this loss of breast milk in the gut, is the underlying cause of separation anxiety.
    Here is a quote that defines separation anxiety.
    Separation anxiety: “From 8 – 14 months, children often become frightened when they meet new people or visit new places. They recognize their parents as familiar and safe. When separated from their parents, particularly when away from home, they feel threatened and unsafe.” – Pub Med Health.
    Note that the time period of separation anxiety fits the time period when weaning often occurs.

    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  137. musea Says:

    REM is a big deal. REM sleep seems to be the period of the greatest trauma in our day to day lives.

    Here is just a partial list of the stress and trauma occurring in the body during every REM phase in sleep – they happen about every 90 minutes and make up about 20% of sleep.

    1. All testosterone production after puberty.
    2. ‘During REM sleep, most brain areas show greatly increased blood flow, almost uniformly greater than 50% above the waking level, and as great as nearly 200%.’
    3. The Right Hemisphere seems to be activated during REM sleep (left – NREM)
    4. Dreams happen mostly in REM sleep (visual side of brain is right hemisphere and seems to be activated during REM – see above)
    5. ‘ Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is characterized by periods of profound cardiac autonomic activation evident in heart rate surges in humans…’
    6. ‘Brain activity increases in motor and sensory areas.’
    7. Muscle paralysis, atonia, sleep paralysis happens, as a person moves into or out of REM
    8. Rapid Eye Movement (REM) – and to a lesser amount there is even a rapid inside ear movement.
    9. Blood pressure increases 30% , blood flow to brain increases by 50-200% from NREM
    10. Respiration – increases and varies from NREM
    11. Body temp is not regulated – drifts towards local environment.
    12. Sexual arousal – increases from NREM.
    13. ‘During REM sleep, intense activity is also observed in the limbic system, a set of structures heavily involved in emotions. Two of these structures are especially active: the hippocampal region and, in particular, the amygdala. Once again, it is interesting to note that this intense limbic activity does not occur during the phases of non-REM sleep , when the dreams that people have are far less emotional.”
    14. During sleep the brain in the gut produces ninety minutes of slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, cycles that correspond to the cycles of deep sleep and REM. When the brain is in deep sleep, the gut quiets down (there is ‘decreased small intestinal motility”), whereas REM has “immediate stimulatory effects on colonic motility”

    What is obvious to me is that if there is trauma in a person’s life, the bulk of it must be in sleep in the REM period. But why – what is all this for? I tend to think that because there is such a direct link with immunity and the amount of sleep, that it has to do with the body’s defense system. Two things may be key here – the colonic push that empties the intestines during REM and the role of fat that seems to play such a big part in the immune system

    Tom Hendricks

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes do not blend
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO (bio summary)

  138. musea Says:

    This is a response to above reply:
    I think almost all of us have sleep trauma of some kind . The two main times of trauma may be very significant biological transitions – the first is when we are weaned from breast milk to solids (note the body’s response as both separation anxiety, and then stranger anxiety). And puberty when sex hormones are a part of all this – and remember all testosterone is made in REM sleep.
    Big health discoveries will happen soon as all this unravels . Perhaps in the future we can heal all this and prevent it from happening in the next generations.

  139. musea Says:

    Teen rebellion may be the bodies reaction to the onslaught of puberty hormones. Therefore teen rebellion is really the outward manifestation of an inner response to the puberty hormones and hormonal change.

  140. musea Says:

    Fats may also play a major part in sexual selection. Note these things:
    Fat is a key part that initiates puberty
    Fat is a key to sexual attraction. (fat lips, breasts, butt)
    Fat, because of its scarcity, may show in those with fat reserves, a healthy mate with a stronger immune system (fat and it’s connection to immunity).

  141. musea Says:

    Why do we have red blood cells and white blood cells? Why not pink blood cells that blend both and to the job of both?

    Red blood cells deliver oxygen. White blood cells defend the body. But why hasn’t natural selection blended the two into pink cells? Why not combine the anabolic red blood cells with the catabolic white blood cells?

    My point is to illustrate this idea: Catabolic and anabolic processes evolved, but they did not blend. The two types of blood cells is a good example of that.

  142. musea Says:

    Testosterone levels seem to peak in men every seven days.
    Could this somehow tie in with women’s monthly menstrual cycles? If so how?

    Testosterone peaks on day 7
    http://www.reuniting.info/node/5092

    The Female Hormone Cycle
    http://myhormonesmademedoit.com/the-female-hormone-cycle/

  143. musea Says:

    More and more I’m seeing humans as following the same stages as a butterfly.
    We are social beings, but when we strip off those social connections and look at our basic biological natures – replication becomes the most important biological goal.

    Butterflies go through four stages – birth, growth as a caterpillar, chrysalis stage, and adult. I think humans are geared to do the same.

    Birth to puberty is growth. Puberty is a sort of chrysalis stage as it prepares the child for sex, then follows the adult butterfly stage for humans to mate and replicate.

    That suggests that puberty may perhaps be the most important milestone in anyone’s life*. And like the caterpillar note the teens need for more food, more sleep, and all the hormonal changes that happen.

    Seems to me that almost everything from puberty on is geared toward sex hormone production and puberty seems to be so traumatic that I think most inner human trauma, and most chronic trauma (that is outside genetic disorders, accidents, or infections) can be traced to it. Those that can’t fully accept puberty and all the changes it brings – have chronic trauma and inner conflicts.

    “It appears that a majority of all hormonal imbalances that lead to cancers of the reproductive system, wrong body hair patterns, sleep cycle disturbances, clinical depression, skin cell health problems, body image imbalances and body weight imbalances originate in trauma that happened in the years around puberty.” – K.C.Avnayt
    ———————
    * The other 2 main life milestones may be breast feeding/weaning in infancy, and giving birth in adult women.

    Tom Hendricks
    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend.

  144. musea Says:

    3 Brain Centers?

    I’m beginning to think that each of us has 3 brain centers that are somewhat separate and independent:

    Head brain center
    ENS or enteric nervous system or gut brain
    Reproductive system after puberty (that may be more independent then we thought)

    The head brain seems to control motor skills, senses and sense analysis and response, regulation of nervous system.

    The ENS seems to control the body – digestion and perhaps much more – remember more messages are sent from the ENS to the head brain than the other way around.

    The reproductive system after puberty – reproduction. First I thought that this would be under control of the lower head brain. But no part of the head brain seems to be able to stop or start production of testosterone after puberty, or limit or increase it’s production directly. The testes control this and seem to have some autonomy.

    Why would the reproductive system be independent? I think it would be important to have the biological urge to mate and reproduce NOT under the total control of the rest of the nervous system. This would make sure there is more sex and more children, and that the desire to mate would trump most other urges of the body.

    Natural selection would promote a separate brain center for the sole purpose of promoting sex, mating and child bearing. The selective advantage would be that the rest of the nervous system, could not trump the mating and reproductive desire.

    Reproductive system has most control during REM sleep when testosterone is made, That may be the reason for REM sleep.

    Reproductive system as independent? Remember if the conscious head brain had any control of sex and reproduction it could stop puberty, adjust it as it’s happening, alter it, etc. – it can do none of those things. It has no control over the process of puberty at all.

    Tom
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS
    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (UV paper)
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  145. musea Says:

    Here is a puzzle for the group about the origin of life, chemistry, biology, etc.

    IF the puzzle premise is true and
    IF the answer to the puzzle is true,
    we may have some general clues to life.

    PUZZLE:

    Put one of each of these 4 sets in column “A”, and the other in column “B”.
    ——————————-
    Catabolic / Anabolic

    Day / Night

    Wet / Dry

    Hydrophobic / hydrophilic
    ——————————–
    Column “A”

    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.

    Column “B”

    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    ————–

    The first friend that saw this, chose as I did

    Column A

    Anabolic
    Night
    Wet
    Hydrophilic
    ————-
    Column B

    Catabolic
    Day
    Dry
    Hydrophobic

    Tom Hendricks
    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  146. musea Says:

    Life – not a chemical system that popped up in an alien environment; but, a chemical system that over millions of years was the most stable response to that environment. – New paradigm in origin of life studies.

  147. musea Says:

    Found out that many of my OOL ideas match those of Richard Lathe, such as
    Fast tidal cycling and the origin of life .

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn4786

  148. musea Says:

    From puberty on the overriding biological drive is to replicate (and later child care). If that sexual desire is blocked in puberty it may lead to many health problems. Resolving those puberty problems may resolve most chronic health problems that began after puberty and that are not caused by genetic problems, infections, etc.

    This suggests a new paradigm for health care. Perhaps the emphasis in psychological counseling should shift from resolving people’s conflicts with others, to first resolving puberty conflicts.

    [UPdate – Most likely that Puberty problems may be a reflection of the food in and waste out patterns set up in infancy during breast feeding and weaning.]

  149. musea Says:

    Fats may be the bodies gold. But too much seems to be almost as bad as not enough.

    Because fat takes so long to digest ( longer than carbohydrates, or even protein), it can delay needed sleep, specially if the fats are eaten late in the day.

    Fat intake negatively influences the sleep pattern in healthy adults
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-06/aaos-fin050708.php

    Excess fats in diet, leads to

    too much waking time to digest the fat, leads to

    delays in sleep or shortens time in sleep, leads to

    less REM  (see studies) and

    more cancers and heart trauma (there are studies that suggest a connection between obesity and cancer, besides the more known diabetes, and heart problems.

    But why the desire for excess fats in the first place?  Maybe something to do with the two milestones,   breastfeeding/weaning and puberty.

  150. musea Says:

    During sleep our body temperature goes down, and there is no shivering or sweating during REM sleep.

    There is also testosterone production in REM, and it needs colder temperatures to work best. That suggests that perhaps a major reason our body temp in men goes down during sleep is to better produce testosterone in REM.

    http://www.circadian.org/vital.html (3rd chart).
    ——————
    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO (bio summary)

  151. musea Says:

    Cortisol-NREM/ Testosterone-REM hormones and sleep.

    Here may be some important clues to why we sleep.

    There may be a hormonal component to sleep that gives us clues to why we need sleep.

    Here are some clues that are interesting. They involve Cortisol and its relationship to NREM or slow wave sleep, and Testosterone and its relationship to REM sleep.
    I suggest that perhaps the cortisol/testosterone ratio is a key component of sleep and health.

    Cortisol, the stress hormone, is mostly released in sleep. Sleep = alternating long periods of NREM sleep with short periods of REM sleep.

    Cortisol, seems to be released in NREM sleep. More cortisol = more NREM sleep.

    Testosterone, the male hormone, is mostly released in REM sleep.

    ‘The cortisol / testosterone ratio’ seems to be important and is much studied.

    Cortisol increases glucose/protein/fat metabolism – so sleep would be increased glucose/protein fat metabolism for the body.

    Cortisol reduces inflammation and stress – so sleep would be important for immunity.

    Cortisol stimulates growth hormone (GH) – so sleep would stimulate growth.

    Too much cortisol – cushing’s disease OBESITY, HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, DIABETES. Compare with

    Too little cortisol – Addison’s disease LACK OF APPETITE, WEIGHT LOSS, LOW BLOOD PRESSURE, CAN’T COPE WITH STRESS.

    That suggests this possibility – too much cortisol/ too little testosterone = obesity. too little cortisol and too much testosterone = weight loss, eating disorders.

    Just about all the cells in the body have receptors for cortisol, and will take it up. So cortisol helps just about every cell in the body – more in sleep and NREM, when it is at it’s highest. It is strong help for stress – would help restore body, get rid of fear, etc. etc. Yet another benefit of sleep

    There are two main adrenal hormones, adrenaline, and cortisol. Seems loosely that adrenaline is fight or flight – a big response for emergencies, and cortisol, is stress resolved during sleep -a small response or cortisol is adrenaline lite. And works for immunity in sleep as well as it’s other functions.

    There is a circadian rhythm in the liver – bile production stops in the evening, and the liver switches over to synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.

    The ENS or gut brain produces slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, that correspond to the cycles of deep sleep and REM. AND
    Most brain areas show greatly increased blood flow during REM sleep. This suggest that the body prepares cortisol, and then sends it out during the REM increased blood flow.

    Discussion – I would suggest that the reason we sleep is to nurture the body and brain during it’s nightly rest period, and that it’s a two step process that involves cortisol being pumped throughout the body during the short REM phases, and cortisol doing its hormonal work during the longer NREM phases. And the first phase of sleep being the production of Cortisol. And that there is a ratio of hormones – cortisol and testosterone that must be in balance. And that too much cortisol to testosterone suggests stress response, and too little cortisol to testosterone suggests a too violent response.

    Facts/ Quotes/ Studies

    ” Lack of sleep disrupts every physiologic function in the body,” said Eve Van Cauter of the University of Chicago. “We have nothing in our biology that allows us to adapt to this behavior.”

    Cortisol levels start to rise approximately 2–3 hours after sleep onset and continue to rise into the early morning and early waking hours. The peak in cortisol is about 9 a.m.; as the day continues, levels decline gradually.

    Acute administration of cortisol increases non-rapid-eye movement (non-REM) sleep, suppresses rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep and stimulates growth hormone (GH) release in healthy subjects.

    Testosterone is produced in bursts that seem to coincide with the phase of sleep that comes just before Rapid-Eye Movement (REM) sleep. REM sleep itself comes in bursts, which usually last longer as the night progresses. Testosterone levels gradually build up over the course of the night, which is why testosterone levels are highest in the morning and lowest in the evening.

    REM-sleep is needed for lasting forgetting of fear.

    We found that evolutionary increases in mammalian sleep durations are strongly associated with an enhancement of immune defences as measured by the number of immune cells circulating in peripheral blood. This appeared to be a generalized relationship that could be independently detected in 4 of the 5 immune cell types and in both of the main sleep phases. Importantly, no comparable relationships occur in related physiological systems that do not serve an immune function. Consistent with an influence of sleep on immune investment, mammalian species that sleep for longer periods also had substantially reduced levels of parasitic infection.
    These relationships suggest that parasite resistance has played an important role in the evolution of mammalian sleep.

    In blood samples taken from patients before and after meals, the investigators discovered that bile acid recycling in the liver is disrupted without cortisol in humans, too.

    After 9pm, the liver switches to its other primary functions, synthesizing chemicals and processing accumulated toxins.
    The cycle begins shifting around 3am, when the liver slows chemical synthesis and readies itself for bile production.
    The liver cycle shifts again around 3pm, when chemical synthesis begins to increase and bile production decreases.
    Thus, the liver is most prepared to aid digestion with its synthesis of bile between 9am and 9pm.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

    These posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend
    http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO (bio summary)
    It now turns out that another normal function of cortisol is to help prepare your body to digest food. When you get hungry, your body starts to make cortisol. This cortisol communicates to your liver, telling your liver to fill up your gall bladder with bile so that you can digest the fats that will be in the upcoming meal. When you eat, the bile is released into your small intestine to perform vital roles in digestion.

    During tonic REM sleep, most brain areas show greatly increased blood flow, almost uniformly greater than 50% above the waking level, and as great as nearly 200%. During phasic REM sleep, there are transient further increases in blood flow to most brain regions, although precise quantification is difficult because the phasic episodes are so short.

    During sleep the brain in the gut produces ninety minutes of slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, cycles that correspond to the cycles of deep sleep and REM. When the brain is in deep sleep, the gut quiets down (there is ‘decreased small intestinal motility”), whereas REM has “immediate stimulatory effects on colonic motility” like those that occur with arousals and waking.

    Increased testosterone-to-cortisol ratio in psychopathy. (study)

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

    —————————————

  152. musea Says:

    Could the cortisole testosterone ratio explain male ornaments like peacock feathers, deer antlers, etc?

    When cortisol is high and testosterone is low – that shows infection is high and the body is high with cortisol to fight infection, or that most sleep is for body repair.

    When testosterone is high and cortisol is low – that shows low infection, and healthy body, and lots of excess testosterone to build male ornaments.

    The female is attracted to the high male ornaments, because they show low infection and good health.

    (See my post on cortisole -NREM sleep / tesosterone – REM sleep)

  153. musea Says:

    Sleep Clues from Circadian Rhythms

    Why do we sleep? I think that solving that problem will open the doors to many health discoveries. Sleep may be a key to a lot!

    We don’t know why we sleep, but maybe the key is research on circadian rhythms.

    Circadian rhythms suggest there is a day night cycle to our health
    First we need to find out what the body does during sleep that it doesn’t do when awake.
    Then use that information to formulate a reason for sleep that covers all the body does during sleep.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  154. musea Says:

    Here’s some assorted quotes – puberty seems to be very upsetting in sleep for both men and women. My contention is that many of us have unconscious sleep/puberty trauma.

    Panic attack/puberty/sleep paralysis:

    The new study shows that the onset of panic attacks is closely linked to puberty. Girls with few signs of puberty reported no panic attacks, but of those who had gone through puberty, 8 percent reported the symptoms. The Stanford group is currently conducting a larger study of both boys and girls.

    About 1.7% of adult Americans, or about 3 million people, will have full-blown panic disorder at some time in their lives, twice as often for women than men. The peak age at which people have their first panic attack (onset) is 15-19 years.

    Circadian rhythm disorders The most common circadian sleep disorder is delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), with typical onset at puberty.

    Once thought to be a male predominant disorder, recent findings suggest that REM sleep behavior disorder may be underdiagnosed in women because the intensity of the behaviors is less prominent than in men. RBD is classified as a parasomnia and presents as vivid dreams with complex, repetitive, and often violent motor behaviors during REM sleep, which classically is a time of muscle atonia.,,,

    One study investigated the effect of the testosterone circadian rhythm both before and after puberty. Thirty-two prepubertal and 14 pubertal boys between the ages of five and 19 years of age were studied. Diurnal rhythms of LH, FSH and testosterone were apparent in all subjects, including those aged five years old, however the average 24-hour LH and testosterone concentrations were much greater with those developing puberty.10 Testosterone levels peak at around 8 a.m. and are at their lowest around 8 p.m.6 It’s been reported that in young men, the sleep-related rise in testosterone has been linked to the first episode of rapid eye movement (REM).

    Although narcolepsy is considered to be a disease of adulthood, most cases have their onset in childhood or adolescence. Early observation in the United States 15 and Japan 16 has reported that approximately half of patients with narcolepsy had onset prior to 15 years of age…

    Women have better sleep quality compared with men, with longer sleep times, shorter sleep-onset latency and higher sleep efficiency. Despite this, women have more sleep-related complaints than men. ..
    Gender differences in sleep become apparent after the onset of puberty. Menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and menopause can alter sleep architecture. Gender-related differences in sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome, include differences in prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and response to therapy.

  155. musea Says:

    Study supports gut selection

    There have been many studies lately suggesting that gut bacteria are a key to health. I have said many times that with millions of years of selection the host, you and I, would have evolved ways to promote beneficial bacteria while protecting itself from dangerous bacteria. i have also suggested that the main source of trauma in humans is not social relationships, but the more basic daily protection from bacteria as we take in nurturing, and excrete out waste.

    This new study from science daily supports all that
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121120193531.htm

  156. musea Says:

    Where does anal or oral behavior come from? Now I think that the ‘anal’ behavior – thin people who are super organized and very fussy about their lives, may be a reflection of childhood infection. IF that is true, and it should be testable, I now have two main premises.

    Anal behavior – infection during childhood.

    Oral behavior – not enough breast milk in childhood.

    Those would be the two biggest childhood unconscious traumas that happen when the infant is setting up his digestive system.

    ———————
    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html (Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  157. musea Says:

    [This is a response to the latest origin theory]

    Here is a totally different paradigm for the origin of life (OOL).
    I think this post and almost every other premise for the OOL, are similar. I disagree with all of them.
    They all suggest that through some steps “of a magical chemical wand’ life processes popped up in a alien earth environment, and somehow survived.

    Let’s turn this upside down.
    Instead of a magical wand, we have nothing. Out of the nothing the most stable chemical system remains. Life, now is defined, not as some chemical students wish list, or idea, but it’s the most stable response to the environment.
    What is stable lasts, what is unstable does not last. Life is the most stable, and more stable than the earth, sea, and air. Earth – techtonics have changed it, Air, no longer reducing, Oceans – sterilized through undersea thermal vents. Life , more stable than earth, air, water.
    Now define life as stable – stable in staying the same when that works, and changing to better fit a changing environment, when that works. So stable is a stable system that is flexible too.

    New paradigm of OOL? Life was not a fluke, the exact opposite, it was the most stable reaction to the environment. That changes everything in your discussion.

  158. musea Says:

    Facts: that will startle you:

    Microbes outnumber the human cells in our bodies by 10 to one.

    The intestinal tract is an extension of the skin. It lines the digestive track with a total surface area TWO HUNDRED times greater than your skin surface area.

    70-80% of your bodies IMMUNE system is in the digestive tract – that’s where your body senses the real danger to your health – pathogens entering through food or water.

    At birth this immune system is not fully developed. Between 4-7 months a baby’s intestinal lining goes through a developmental growth called closure.

    Ending breast feeding too soon introduces pathogens into the infant that he is not developed to handle.
    ————————
    These facts should shift your health concerns to your gastrointestinal tract!
    ————————-
    More info on that:

    Microbes outnumber the human cells in our bodies by about 10 to 1 ( you are a walking zoo – a self contained little earth). Enteric bacteria flora (bacteria in your gut) is the major stimulus for development of mucosal immune system.

    The intestinal tract (mucosa) is an extension of the skin and lines the digestive track from mouth to anus – total surface area is 200 X greater than skin surface. Your digestive tract makes up the largest surface area in your body and is exposed to an enormous amount of food during a lifetime. The skin is exposed to the external environment, but unlike the mucosa, it is sealed.

    70-80% of your bodies immune system is in the digestive tract. “There are more neurotransmitters in the GI , gastrointestinal tract, than in the brain and more nerve endings than in the spine”.. The intestine possesses the largest mass of lymphoid tissue in the human body.

    At birth, the neonate’s mucosal immune system is relatively undeveloped, but the colonization of intestinal flora accelerates its development.

    Between four and seven months a baby’s intestinal lining goes through a developmental growth spurt called closure,meaning the intestinal lining becomes more selective about what to let through.

  159. musea Says:

    Let’s go further with evolutionary theory. IF: Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they did not blend, THEN a positive mutation on either side would spur the other to improve and a negative mutation would be somewhat offset by the other side. We not only have evolution, we have a new drive IN evolution – it’s not just natural selection – it’s natural selection + support from the other side (catabolic and or anabolic)

  160. Tom Hendricks Says:

    Life began as the most stable chemical reaction to UV energy in a day night cycle.

  161. musea Says:

    Reblogged this on Musea Zine and commented:

    Life Definition: Life began as the most stable chemical reaction to UV energy in a day night cycle:

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  162. musea Says:

    Now I think that all men, after puberty have a once a week surge release of testosterone, probably during the 6 AM warm up from sleep, when the heart surges to warm us up and get us out of bed. Once a week around sun up. I don’t think this is noticeable to us for the most part, but I do have this chart. it suggests for abstinence, but I think it works whether celebrate or sexually active.

  163. musea Says:

    Now I think that the main inner conflict in human behavior and health, is between the efficient but somewhat robotic ENS, or Enteric Nervous System, our ‘gut’brain, plugging away at digestion, waste out, and our immune system on one side, and on the other our head brain, that due to some infant problem ( specifically either not enough breast feeding OR weaning trauma) over compensates and over rules the ENS.
    This happens when something triggers those infant traumas in the head brain.

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  164. musea Says:

    Notes on sleep – it is turning out to be very very complex

    Sleep is much more than a little activity in the head brain.
    Left hemisphere – visual, is active during REM where we have visual dreams
    Right hemisphere – language, is active during NREM where most talking in sleep is.

    But I don’t think that is why we sleep, or what sleep is about.

    I’ve got 3 things going on, that seem more important.

    1. ENS, enteric nervous system, or gut brain, stops eating and finishes up digestion, and colon after taking out water for next days digestive processes, gets ready for waste out.

    2. Hormones released; growth hormone, and from puberty on, sex hormones for both sexes.

    3. Bile production stops in liver, and shifts to immune work.

    But this is still way too vague for me. Overall there is a shift from digesting and using food, to a two part

    1. finishing digestion, making hormones, recycling water from the colon, liver working on getting rid of toxins and somehow dealing with fat, (NREM) AND THEN:

    2. flushing all this – waste out in colon, hormones through blood stream in the body, liver toxins out.

    Very complex stuff. Lot more than just a head brain dreaming – that’s the tip of the iceberg.

  165. musea Says:

    From Science Daily Article: The researchers found that infants born by cesarean delivery were lacking a specific group of bacteria found in infants delivered vaginally, even if they were breastfed. Infants strictly formula-fed, compared with babies that were exclusively or partially breastfed, also had significant differences in their gut bacteria.

    That may be a key to health.

  166. musea Says:

    There are many problems to understanding why we sleep – one is the muscle paralysis that occurs in REM. The accepted idea of not hurting others in sleep because of dreams, seems ludicrous to me. (Do other animals and birds that sleep and have REM sleep, strike out?) Maybe a better idea is this:

    1. The body releases growth hormone in NREM,
    2. Then in REM, following the NREM period, the muscles are in paralysis to better accept the growth horrnone and process it. Now that seems a better idea.
    Could muscle paralysis be connected to the release of HGH – human growth hormone?

    Background Quote:
    The body releases HGH (human growth hormone or GH) while it sleeps, and the prime time for growth hormone release is during slow wave sleep (SWS),

    A protein hormone, HGH promotes the growth, maintenance and repair of muscles and bones by facilitating the use of amino acids (the essential building blocks of protein). Every tissue in the body is renewed faster during sleep than at any time when awake.

  167. musea Says:

    Selection fitness is not just about defeating opponents for resources – it is equally about symbiotic relationships. The most fit often get that way by getting along with others.

  168. musea Says:

    Could part of the reason we sleep (REM where colon contractions are high) be to take in water for the next day’s enzymes for digestion?

    Sleep: One main reason may be to recover water for the next day’s digestion.
    IF you don’t have enough sleep, then there was not enough time to extract enough water to properly digest the next day’s food. Sleep then would be vital to digestion and therefore every aspect of our well being.

    Notes and Quotes

    One of the chief functions of the colon is the reabsorption of much of the water used in the digestive process. If all the water in which the digestive enzymes were secreted was lost in the feces, man would have to drink liquids continually. If too much water is expelled with the feces, then a condition known as diarrhea exists.
    —-
    This 10 percent of water absorption in your large intestine amounts to anywhere between a pint and a quart of water, and represents a significant portion of your body’s daily intake of water. As water is absorbed from the waste material in your colon, so are some nutrients, mainly minerals like sodium and chloride.
    —-
    Production and intake:
    Saliva 1.0 liter
    Swallowed liquids 2.3 liters (most contained in the food we eat)
    Gastric juice 2.0 liters
    Bile 1.0 liter
    Pancreatic juice 2.0 liters
    Intestinal juice 1.0 liter (primarily from brush border cells)
    Total 9.3 liters (average 154 lb man)

    Recycled and excreted:
    Small intestine reabsorption 8.3 liters
    Colon reabsorption 1.0 liter
    Excreted in feces 0.1 liter
    Total 9.3 liters (average 154 lb man)
    —-
    The colon’s main job is to reclaim the excess water from the intestinal waste and recycle it back into your bloodstream for reuse.

    Over the course of a typical twenty-four hour period, the longest spell most of us go without fluid intake is the six to eight hours we spend sleeping. Sleeping is hardly the kind of activity that you sweat over, but that doesn’t mean you’re not losing water during the night. With every somnolent breath, you expel moisture, and the cumulative effect of a night’s sleep is to dry out.
    ——
    During sleep the brain in the gut produces ninety minutes of slow muscle contractions followed by short periods of rapid muscle movements, cycles that correspond to the cycles of deep sleep and REM.
    —–
    Our bodies are about 50% water by weight. Of this, about 30% is lymph. The rest is blood plasma, interstitial fluid (in the tissues), and cerebral spinal fluid. By volume, our bodies contain about three times as much lymph as they do blood.
    ——
    During tonic REM sleep, on the other hand, most brain areas show greatly increased blood flow, almost uniformly greater than 50% above the waking level, and as great as nearly 200%. During phasic REM sleep, there are transient further increases in blood flow to most brain regions, although precise quantification is difficult because the phasic episodes are so short.
    ——–
    … REM has “immediate stimulatory effects on colonic motility” like those that occur with arousals and waking.
    ———
    Water is required for practically every bodily function and below are just some of the processes carried out within the body that depend on water to take place: Water is needed in order to break down and digest food, carry nutrients in the bloodstream to where they are needed and to eliminate any waste. Food cannot be digested without water. Water helps digested food pass through the body quicker, preventing constipation and any toxins and waste material from sitting inside the body for too long and accumulating to dangerous levels. Drinking water replenishes bodily fluids lost through sweating, especially when playing sports and through passing urine. Water aids circulation. Drinking water helps to regulate the temperature of the body and body heat. Water is needed to keep the kidneys healthy and in working order and prevents urinary infections from occurring. Water keeps joints and eyes lubricated, and acts as a protective cushion for tissues and cells. It is the basis of all body fluids such as blood and saliva. Water keeps the skin hydrated, supple and looking healthy and glowing. Water is the main component of muscles and keeps them toned and firm. Water dilutes toxins and removes them from the body. Water aids in the metabolism and elimination of fats. Without water, fat deposits in the body will increase. Drinking water will alleviate water retention and lessen swelling of hands and feet. The brain is comprised of a lot of water and therefore needs replenishment to keep it working well and to full capacity. Without water we may lose concentration and suffer headaches and tiredness. Water dilutes the calcium in our urine, which could crystalise to form kidney stones if the body did not receive enough fluids.

  169. musea Says:

    THE ENS PREDATES THE CNS? SEA CUCUMBERS

    The enteric brain is ancient in evolutionary terms and probably antedates the CNS. It has been discovered in a sea cucumber. Sea cucumbers belong to the echinoderms, a sister phylum to our phylum, the chordates. It was believed that the nervous system of echinoderms consisted of only a ring of nervous tissue but recent research shows that echinoderms have a sophisticated enteric nervous system.
    When animals were first evolving, their main concern was physical sustenance and so the first nerves to develop were those in the digestive track. As life evolved further, animals required a more complex brain, but the gut’s nervous system was too important to be marginalized. Nature thus maintained the enteric nervous system independent of the central nervous system in the brain and spinal cord. Both brains originate during fetal development from tissues called the neural crest. This structure divides to form the two brains, loosely connected by a group of only a few thousand nerve fibers called the vagus nerve (1, 2).

    In evolutionary terms, it makes sense that the body has two brains, said Dr. David Wingate, a professor of gastrointestinal science at the University of London and a consultant at Royal London Hospital. “The first nervous systems were in tubular animals that stuck to rocks and waited for food to pass by,” according to Dr. Wingate. The limbic system is often referred to as the “reptile brain.” “As life evolved, animals needed a more complex brain for finding food and sex and so developed a central nervous system. But the gut’s nervous system was too important to put inside the newborn head with long connections going down to the body,” says Wingate. Offspring need to eat and digest food at birth. Therefore, nature seems to have preserved the enteric nervous system as an independent circuit inside higher animals. It is only loosely connected to the central nervous system and can mostly function alone, without instructions from topside. (psyking.net)

  170. musea Says:

    The main aspect of sleep may be to keep us from eating, so the ENS can finish digestion (and the liver to do it’s nightly work, etc). That may be why the conscious brain is out or ‘sedated’ for 8 hours.

  171. musea Says:

    There seems to be more than one brain center in us humans. We know of at least two: The Head brain and the Enteric Nervous system Note to that the head brain has two distinct hemispheres in the cerebrum which is just one part of the head brain.

    My question is why are the head brain and ENS independent of each other. I would think that it would be better to have one in charge. But maybe not.

    Perhaps the conflicts that emerge between the different brain centers are an evolutionary advantage. I would contend that when they are in conflict they present unconscious problems and trauma that need to be resolved. But this must be a lesser evil, if after all these years the two remain independent.

    Notes and Quotes:

    Therefore, nature seems to have preserved the enteric nervous system as an independent circuit inside higher animals. It is only loosely connected to the central nervous system and can mostly function alone, without instructions from topside.

    Just like the larger brain in the head, researchers say, this system )Enteric Nervous System) sends and receives impulses, records experiences and respond to emotions. Its nerve cells are bathed and influenced by the same neurotransmitters. The gut can upset the brain just as the brain can upset the gut.

    …Scientists were shocked to learn that about 90 percent of the fibers in the primary visceral nerve, the vagus, carry information from the gut to the brain and not the other way around.

    Nearly every chemical that controls the brain is also located in the stomach region, including hormones and neurotransmitters such as Serotonin, Dopamine, Glutamate, GABA and Norepinephrine. The gut contains 100 million neurons – more than the spinal cord. But there are also two-dozen small brain proteins; major cells of the immune system; one class of the body’s natural opiates; and native benzodiazepines. The gut, known as the enteric nervous system, is located in sheaths of tissue lining the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon, and plays a key role in human emotions. But few know the enteric nervous system exists, and therefore gut health is often overlooked. Symptoms from the two brains can get confused, and just as the brain can upset the gut, the gut can also upset the brain.
    The enteric nervous system, the lesser-know of the two brains, manages the gastrointestinal tract without the assistance of the cranial brain (3). It regulates the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, and colon by mixing food with digestive enzymes and pushing food along the tract. It also helps control the absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream and protects the body against harmful bacteria and toxins that may enter with food (2). The autonomy of the ENS has great advantages. Its proximity to the structures it controls provides “second-to-second control” and eliminates the need for a thick cable of nerves linking it to the cranial brain (1).

  172. musea Says:

    This science daily article is about the adult trauma that comes from missing meals as a child.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227121910.htm

    I suggest that they are on the right tract but not there yet – It’s lack of breast feeding leading to a biological separation anxiety.

    Now add the introduction of solid foods too soon and this leads to biological stranger anxiety.

    Therefore for me, it’s not missing a meal but the trauma of missing out on breast feeding during the first year.

  173. musea Says:

    Seems we had a snowball earth where most of the earth was covered in ice. When it subsided, life exploded. I suggest this model

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228155626.htm

    The greater the selection pressure – directional or diversifying selection – the greater the speed of evolution in the area of the selection pressure,
    AND
    the lower the selection pressure – stabilizing selection – the lower the speed of evolution in the area of the selected pressure.

    Which is a big way of saying nothing changes until it’s forced to.

  174. musea Says:

    A bio basis in infancy for overweight problems?

    I thought separation anxiety seen in most infants, had a bio basis – a loss of breast feeding or separation from breast milk. Then I thought that separation anxiety*, if triggered later in life, would lead to obesity to over compensate for that bio anxiety in infancy.

    I couldn’t find anything directly, but when I saw this study of “50 fat celebs”, and looked up a few famous ones, they all had a major trigger event of great trauma – usually the loss of a mother or separation from her. I stopped looking when it came up in every bio except William Shatner – then I found that he lost his wife in a sudden drowning.

    All these celebs either came from broken homes, or lost their mom early in life or like Elvis or Artie, a little later.

    Kirstie Alley, Oprah, Elvis, Sally Struthers, Roseanne Barr, Artie Lang, Orson Welles, Aretha Franklin,

    So that suggests weight problems is first separation anxiety connected to breast feeding, then a trigger event that magnifies it.

    The celebrities I looked up were: Kirstie Alley, Oprah, Elvis, Sally Struthers, Roseanne Barr, Artie Lang, Orson Welles, Aretha Franklin. All had major traumas with mother or father or broken homes early in life.
    —————–

    * The other anxiety – stranger anxiety, may be first from an infection, then a later trigger event leads to trauma.

  175. musea Says:

    Now I see the reptilian brain as a key to sleep and much stress trauma. That ups the count to 5 brains working somewhat independently! 1 and 2,Cerebrum left and right, 3 and 4, reptilian brain left and right, and 5. ENS (and I haven’t counted the limbic yet). I also am now thinking that these 5 are not working in sync as much as we think. I think that evolution is not neat, and that there may be a reasonable amount of stress and trauma between the different minds.

    I used to think the ENS had the ability to think and key to sleep and unconscious trauma. Now I think the ENS is the digestion side and keeps to that with almost full independence unless a stress emergency over rides it.

    The reptilian brain may be the one where the sleep and unconscious trauma is. It may be this fight or flight brain, is the one active when there is trauma from stress or infection.

    BUT the main stress – outside infection – is not enough food in (separation anxiety) or not enough waste out (stranger anxiety).

    So, if so, I wonder what the reptilian brain is doing during sleep and doing unconsciously and what that has to do with the main two stresses 1. not enough food in, 2. not enough waste (pathogens and stress) out.

  176. musea Says:

    Perhaps unraveling sleep may be a key to just about everything. Start with this short poem about sleep/weight
    Science studies show that amount of hours asleep is important:

    SLEEP 6 = OVERWEIGHT,
    SLEEP 8 = LOWER WEIGHT

  177. musea Says:

    There may be a case made that the R-complex (reptilian brain) sleeps in REM sleep, while the Neo Cortex (cerebrum) sleeps in NREM. That gives rest to both brains, while keeping one ‘awake’ for protection.

  178. musea Says:

    My own R-complex brain is teaching me a lot – IF correct it is saying that almost all of the fight and flight response is in sleep – during deep sleep or NREM when the R-complex is awake, and at pathogens, most of which are connected with food in or waste out.

    Now if true, that is a switch – our conscious social response of fight or flight may well be a projection of or an evolution from the inner sleep struggle against pathogens.

  179. musea Says:

    Most current origin of life scenarios, start out with what I call “X” Steps of a Chemical Wand. Though each scenario is different, they have steps not too different from:
    A leads to B leads to C leads to D = life.

    But I see problems with that.

    1. These “X” amount of steps require some fluke events – the chemicals must all be assembled in the same place at the same time, under certain conditions, in a certain order etc. There are a lot of chances for something to go wrong, and hardly any chance for it to go right. Let’s say that’s one fluke event – thought it’s really many.
    2. Life, now created, is immediately destroyed by UV light. Back to the drawing board, OR
    3. Some places on earth are without UV danger. Though it should be noted there was no protection from UV for millions of years – such that life would have had to hide from it during all that time under this “X” Chemical Steps, scenario.
    4. But these UV free places have problems too. They don’t have the constant energy of the sun, nor do they have the cyclical aspect of a sun/hot/ then night/cool cycle. Yet almost all life seems to be based on that circadian cycle, and the earliest proven life which seems to be cyanobacterial like, probably depended on the sunlight for it’s energy. So did life begin without the sun and then switch (another fluke event).
    5. There may have been an alternate energy source such as radiating earth, lighting, thermal vents etc., such that sunlight was not needed. But none of those are either
    a. a constant source of energy over billions of years like the sun
    b. a cyclical source of energy that is on for a time and then off such that every aspect of life seems adapted to.
    6. With this above scenario of “X” Chemical Steps, we need fluke events at every step, not only the first initial steps but for every step that followed. Seems to be so unlikely as to not have happened. And what’s not a fluke is that no origin of life scenario using this process HAS worked.

  180. musea Says:

    My clue to the origin would be this: life is what lasts till the next day. Look for Hendricks Stability (stability that keeps what works, and adjusts what needs work) as the main reason for coding. Then you see that the denaturing difference between the two pairs of bases G-C, A-T, is under selection for stability. Such that A-T bases denature first – more flexibility and change, but G-C denatures last, stability.

  181. musea Says:

    What might aliens look like? Let’s take the premise that life has to have a specific atmosphere (in a Goldilocks zone). That atmosphere demands a gravity that is not too much (like Jupiter) not too little (like the Moon). Let’s say life has to have water. Then the planet has to be within a certain temp zone. Start putting these all together and you find a lot of limits – and within those limits there are only so many ways you can fly, swim, burrow, and walk. In other words aliens will most likely be on a planet with water temperature, gravity like ours, etc.

  182. musea Says:

    Why would the body take water from the colon, of all places. That’s water with feces in it. But it does. At night the colon contractions reverse to keep in the contents, and then water is absorbed from the colon to keep water levels right, and for the next days digestion needs.

    Then it dawned on me that for our ancestors, no water on earth would be more healthy than colon water. Here are some reasons I found.
    1. Water in the colon has gone through all the gastrointestinal tract filters including the acid in the stomach.
    2. There is a world of gut biota in the colon. Good bacteria that the body supports would help clean the water from pathogens.
    3. When we wake up we can excrete out all the waste in the colon in a bowel movement.
    4. Surprisingly, about 70% of the immune system is in the colon.

    We need water. Regulating water is a key aspect of health. What better water tank for us is there than the colon?

  183. musea Says:

    The reduction of antibodies in mother’s milk at 6 months, may be the trigger for setting up the infants immune system.

  184. musea Says:

    day – for external movement
    night – for internal improvement

  185. musea Says:

    Seems to be generally excepted that excessive male ornaments in animals, birds, etc. shows a lack of infection.

    Maybe this is why. Testosterone and other hormones are made in NREM sleep. That is also the most active time to fight pathogens with 70% of our immune system in our gut.

    I suggest that testosterone and the other hormones are made to FIRST attack gut pathogens that come in with water from the colon. Then what is left over is used to build male ornaments.
    Therefore the female knows that the male with male ornaments has low infection, because he has high testosterone to build male ornaments.

  186. musea Says:

    Could it be this simple – Could the cause of underweight or overweight be in the composition of our gut microbes in infancy?

    During earliest childhood when food in and waste out processes were set up in the infant, there may have been two main possible traumas.

    Those that have underweight (anal) problems – had gut biota that caused infection. These infants have fear of infection. To compensate they take in little food for fear of more infection and are highly discriminating about food in.

    Those that have overweight (oral) problems – had gut biota that didn’t bring in enough needed nurturing. To compensate for this problem they take in more food.

    I googled obesity – gut bacteria. Here’s a sample of the reports supporting this.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130515113744.htm
    http://www.nature.com/news/gut-microbe-may-fight-obesity-and-diabetes-1.12975
    http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/17183309/reload=0

    Breast feeding is important here too. Without it the child is more prone to obesity. And when it is stopped too soon it denies the infant the antibodies in it that continue through the first 6 months.
    ———–

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    BIOLOGICAL SPECULATIONS Through The Years
    http://wp.me/P5S9X-Pp
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  187. musea Says:

    Just found this: Spike in testosterone in infancy from 4-6 would exactly coincide with the ending of mother’s milk antibodies, and the beginning of the infants immune system.

    Early infancy androgen effects are the least understood. In the first weeks of life for male infants, testosterone levels rise. The levels remain in a pubertal range for a few months, but usually reach the barely detectable levels of childhood by 4–6 months of age.[15][16] The function of this rise in humans is unknown. It has been speculated that “brain masculinization” is occurring since no significant changes have been identified in other parts of the body.[17] Surprisingly, the male brain is masculinized by testosterone being aromatized into estrogen, which crosses the blood–brain barrier and enters the male brain, whereas female fetuses have alpha-fetoprotein which binds up the estrogen so that female brains are not affected.[18]

  188. musea Says:

    More on male ornaments. When I claimed the idea of male ornaments showing females low infection, to a friend, he said that was an accepted idea. So it is not one of mine. Here is a study I found that relates. It is in birds – so you will like that aspect. Note to the footnotes. This paper supports earlier work in this area.

    Carotenoid-based plumage coloration of male greenfinches reflects
    health and immunocompetence
    http://www.georgealozano.com/papers/carotenoids/Saks2K03.pdf

  189. musea Says:

    Trauma that doesn’t make logical sense is most likely unconscious trauma in the digestion system.

  190. musea Says:

    Pre PUBERTY TRAUMA
    Could pre puberty be a time of great trauma for the child?
    We are biological creatures. Reproduction is perhaps our main biological reason for being. With that in mind, I’m looking at that period for males up to the first ejaculations in puberty. I now think there may have been a lot of pre-puberty trauma. Until puberty is finished, there may well be a lot of pent up trauma that unconsciously drives the pre pubescent boy.

    I have suggested that the main traumas of infants are either not enough nurturing trauma, or infection trauma. Now I add the pre puberty trauma in male children (And most likely something similar in females during puberty).

    “It appears that a majority of all hormonal imbalances that lead to cancers of the reproductive system, …, sleep cycle disturbances, clinical depression, skin cell health problems, body image imbalances and body weight imbalances originate in trauma that happened in the years around puberty.” KC Avnayt.

    Beyond the documented problems with puberty, I would suggest these: sleep disorders (almost all are worse during puberty), depression, moodiness, fears that cause withdrawals, teen violence, etc etc. Food problems, allergies (most happen during puberty years), etc. During puberty, your body grows faster than at any other time in your life, except when you were a baby.

    Testosterone production happens in night with a high point reached in early morning when we wake up. Getting up and early morning may be a traumatic time. Testosterone also peaks in a 7 day cycle, so once a week when testosterone is at it’s highest, and the prepub child cannot yet ejaculate, should be traumatic. Testosterone 7 day chart.

    I also think that smell plays a much more important part to sex than we acknowledge. So with all the usual problems of sexual tension, first attractions, and sexual frustration, I would add that any major meeting place (stores, theaters, schools, etc.) would have the smell of women that should make pre puberty for boys even more frustrating. Also puberty most likely triggers any infant traumas too (fear of separation, or stranger anxiety)

    This part of a person’s life, would be like total sexual constipation. We males are built to ejaculate and reproduce. Until we can it would be a biological trauma. like a child wanting to grow up but can’t or has to wait.

    My contention is that this pre puberty pressure of growing up, is a trauma no one knows about. We only know the symptoms, and those symptoms are usually dismissed as problems of growing up or being a teen.

  191. musea Says:

    What interested me the most was that some of our gut microbes excrete out their own antibiotics! That means we
    have our own immune system and a 2nd one of supportive microbes that live within us.
    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/07/22/203659797/staying-healthy-may-mean-learning-to-love-our-microbiomes

  192. musea Says:

    The Male Trade Off: high testosterone means low immunity

    1. Testosterone represses the immune system
    2. In puberty there is a spike in testosterone for males
    3. This suppresses or reduces the immune system
    4. TRADE OFF FOR MALES – more sex, or more immunity.
    5. Females favor male ornaments that show high testosterone. This shows low infection in the male or his immune system would be more active.
    6. If male child has infection trauma, puberty male trade off will be more traumatic. There may be a fear of infection disguised as a fear of sex, women, etc.
    7. This causes a puberty civil war within males. More testosterone for mating also means more suppression of the immune system.
    8. Male Trade off is bad for males, but good for natural selection – healthy males mate more.

  193. musea Says:

    COMMENT ON THE ORIGIN OF LIFE THEORIES. Sure miracles can happen, but why not accept the obvious instead of a miracle. Would you bet on winning the lottery over the sun coming up tomorrow? Why not accept the steady energy from the sun over a billion years, instead of a fluke energized event on a changing earth? That by the way, is a scenario that says first life was in no way selected for, in that first environment – so that’s another fluke it has to overcome – popping up in an hostile environment that most likely would then destroy it.
    Why not the obvious – Millions of years of chemical adaptation to the environment. Then instead of life being a miracle, it is the most stable reaction to the environment. Then instead of a creationists moment of chemical magic, you have a logical sound argument? Life is what I call double stability . That is, stability that keeps what works, and adjusts what needs work in that environment. That arose from adapting to a day night cycle. Every aspect of every living thing still shows that duality.

  194. musea Says:

    Bacteria Gene Transfer and natural selection from mother to child – a new way of selection?

    When a child is born, it’s gut gets the flora of the mother. I suggest this is a gene transfer from mother to child – but not directly, but through bacteria gene transfer.

    Could there be natural selection on this means of gene transfer? Is this outside of the genome, genes? Does what the mother eat, or her health, under one birth so different from another birth, that one child has a better gut flora?

    There are a lot of questions here. Do we have a new source of mutation? evolution? etc.?

    Grandmother passes her gut biota to Mother that passes it to her daughter – etc. A sort of female transfer of bacteria genes?

    Could this be a gene transfer, not of human genes, but of symbiotic gut bacteria genes passed from human mother to child (and from daughter to her child).

    Note too that this genome transfer from gut to gut, doesn’t have to be incorporated into the human genome – that’s the challenging discovery here – they have a gut line through females.

    This goes further – and becomes somewhat Landmarkian in that the bacterial pop changes during life. Not a longer neck on that giraffe, but a better gut biota on the mom!!! Then too this would apply to a wide range of animals.

    ———————————————————

    Here’s some background from wikipedia “Gut Flora:

    Acquisition of gut flora in human infants[edit]

    The gastrointestinal tract of a normal fetus is sterile. During birth and rapidly thereafter, bacteria from the mother and the surrounding environment colonize the infant’s gut. Immediately after vaginal delivery, babies may have bacterial strains derived from the mothers’ feces in the upper gastrointestinal tract.[21] … After birth, environmental, oral and cutaneous bacteria are readily transferred from the mother to the infant through suckling, kissing, and caressing. All infants are initially colonized by large numbers of E. coli and streptococci. Within a few days, bacterial numbers reach 108 to 1010 per gram of feces.[22][24] During the first week of life, these bacteria create a reducing environment favorable for the subsequent bacterial succession of strict anaerobic species mainly belonging to the genera Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Clostridium, and Ruminococcus.[25] …
    ——–
    The major factors that influence the colonization of gut flora in the infant include the status of the mother’s gut flora (as this will be passed to the infant), the method of delivery, type of feeding, and antibiotic use. There are also other factors that play a role, including the infant’s overall environment, hygiene, and perinatal stress. The colonization of the gut flora at the beginning of life is significant because the gut flora impacts the development of the immune system, has a major role in immune system functioning (80-85% of the immune system is in the gut), and thereby influences the process by which autoimmune and metabolic disease occurs. Disease begins in the gut and it starts at the very beginning of life!
    ————
    In the unborn child, it was once believed that the gut was sterile. However, recent research suggests that colonization of the gut begins when the unborn child swallows amniotic fluid containing microbes from the mother’s gut. The majority of the colonization of the gut occurs during the birthing process when the infant is further exposed to a large amount of bacteria from the mother. If the mother’s flora is damaged or imbalanced, this will be passed on to the infant. …
    ——————-
    The feeding method, or diet, of an infant also influences the gut flora by providing a source of nutrition that allows for the growth and function of flora and providing a source of continued colonization of microorganisms from the environment. For babies that are breastfed, bacteria from the feeding environment will be transferred from the mother’s skin and milk ducts. For those that are bottle-fed, bacteria will be transferred from the dried powder and the equipment and water used to prepare the formula. Breastfed newborns carry a more stable and uniform population of gut flora compared to bottle-fed infants…. One of the main reasons behind why breastfeeding is so health-promoting is because of its effects on the gut flora…. The type of infant feeding is critical in influencing the composition of the gut flora, thereby affecting development of the immune system and long-term health.
    ———-
    This article seems to fit: Breastfeeding linked to healthy Infant Gut: Bacterial Colonization Leads to Changes in the Infant’s Expression of Genes.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120429234641.htm
    ————

  195. musea Says:

    This study is very interesting – if true it means that cesarean births that don’t get the needed gut bacteria that vaginal births do, might compensate through the breast milk of the mother.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130822091026.htm

    I tend to think that this basic birth bacteria helps set up the immune system, the food in system, and the waste out system. Remember that as antibodies from the mother’s breast milk decrease at six months in, the child’s defense system begins to kick in. Looks like best health is when the two overlap and what is lost from the mother is gained by the child’s developing system.

  196. musea Says:

    While reading a book, Are We Hardwired, about the role of genes, I saw that they mentioned the paramecium with it’s two nuclei. Quote from Encyclopeida Britannica below.

    Now I wonder how separate these two are in humans. How separate from the rest of the body,is puberty and the body changes that puberty brings. Is there a 2nd brain a sort of micronucleus in humans, that covers puberty that is somewhat separate from a comparable macronucleus brain?

    “Paramecia have two kinds of nuclei: a large ellipsoidal nucleus called a macronucleus and at least one small nucleus called a micronucleus. Both types of nuclei contain the full complement of genes that bear the hereditary information of the organism. The organism cannot survive without the macronucleus; it cannot reproduce without the micronucleus.”

    How separate do you think the two are in humans?

    Tom

  197. musea Says:

    Many of my posts are built on the premise of the evolution of catabolic and anabolic processes to other separate deconstructive and constructive processes.
    Catabolic and anabolic processes evolve but they do not blend

    This example is of C Elegans, a nematode, and one of the most simple of multi cell animals. Scientists were studying the genes to see how its nervous system worked.

    Quote:

    C. elegans has concentrated receptors for chemicals it dislikes into one set of neurons, and receptors for preferred chemicals into a different set of neurons. Once stimulated by any chemical able to interact with one of its receptors … the neuron triggers only a single kind of response. Whereas paramecia were forced to develop an attraction or repulsion response within the context of a single cell, the multicellular C. elegans, has the luxury of placing these responses under the control of separate sensing systems. – Are We Hard Wired , Clark and Grunstein.

    This suggests that in this simple nematode, there are two separate and somewhat independent groups of receptors. One that attracts, or moves towards, and one that repulses, or separates from.

    I suggest that this separate systems idea evolved to all animals.

  198. musea Says:

    3 Brain System.

    Looking at C. elegans we can see 3 distinct brain systems: Outside brain, Inside brain, and connector brain. I suggest that all animals have that 3 part nervous system.

    Quote: We now know where every single nerve cell is located in C. elegans, what it is connected to, and in most cases, what it does. … total of 959 cells, of which 302 cells are separate and distinct neurons.
    These neurons fall into three broad classes:
    1. afferent or sensory neurons, that perceive environmental or internal cues;
    2. interneurons, that handle communications between two or more neurons; and
    3. motor neurons, that interact with other cells in the body, triggering an appropriate response to perceived environmental or internal cues. Motor neurons activate either muscle cells, stimulating bodily movement or contraction of internal organs, or glands, triggering the release of hormones or other chemical mediators.
    This tripartite organization of the nervous system is typical of all higher animals, including humans. Are We Hard Wired, Clark and Grunstein.

    My suggestion is that these three broad classes could be restated as:

    1. OUTSIDE THE BODY BRAIN: Cerebrum and perhaps Cerebellum: for sensory perception, and motor activities.
    2. CONNECTOR BRAIN: Connecting brain system: lower head brain, spinal column, etc. and
    3. INSIDE THE BODY BRAIN: ENS, enteric nervous system, for digestion, food in and waste out, and other inside the body processes

    Note how independent the ENS is in C. elegans:

    The alimentary system, one of the most complex portions of the nematode anatomy, is composed of a large variety of tissues and cell types (White, 1988). Direct intercellular connections between the alimentary tissues and the rest of the body are minimal. Topologically, this system forms a separate epithelial tube running inside the cylindrical body wall, separated from it by the pseudocoelomic space, and placed parallel to the gonad.
    http://www.wormatlas.org/hermaphrodite/alimentary/mainframe.htm

    —————-
    MORE

    There seems to be two strong circadian rhythms that support the 3 brain system.
    1. outside the body head brain
    2. inside the body digestion brain
    3. connector brain that coordinates the other two.

    “Although it’s known that the brain, largely in response to sunlight, sends neural impulses throughout the body that regulate circadian, or daily, rhythms, research at the University of Virginia shows that the liver also sets its own circadian rhythm timed to regular meals.

    Recent research not only confirms that the liver has its own circadian rhythm synchronized with meals, but that the interaction of this hepatic system with the circadian rhythms produced by the brain is important in the synchronization of internal physiology, especially metabolism. (livestrong.com)

  199. musea Says:

    We know of the menstruation cycle in women. But is there a weekly cycle of testosterone production in men?

    This shows that during abstinence, testosterone spikes on the 6th and 7th days.
    Could this testosterone spike be in most males – such that it’s 7 day cycle, fits into the female 28 day one?

    Found this article that seems to bolster that idea.

    “Fertile Women Have a Heightened Sense of Smell – reaction to male pheromones is especially high.”
    “Naturally cycling women near ovulation were more sensitive to musk and the pheromones than the women on contraceptives.” From Scientific American Mind Sept/Oct 2013

  200. musea Says:

    Whoa! it’s believe it or not time – this has to do with the jejunum.
    Seems it may be the source of both SLEEP, and fear reflex VOMITING.

    Book on sleep Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine Chapter 27 (online)

    These thoughts raise the issue of whether there may be changes in the GI system with food ingestion that could produce a hypnotic effect. Along these lines, an intriguing observation was made by Alverez[73] in 1920. He noted that distention of a jejunal balloon caused his human subject to drop off to sleep. The hypnotic effects of afferent intestinal stimulation have also been documented in animal studies. Perhaps the most notable work was a study which induced cortical synchronization in cats by both mechanical and electrical stimulation of the small bowel.[74]

    73. Alverez WC: Physiologic studies on the motor activities of the stomach and bowel in man. Am J Physiol 1920; 88:658-660.
    74. Kukorelli T, Juhasz G: Sleep induced by intestinal stimulation in cats. Physiol Behav 1976; 19:355-358.

    This too from wikipedia: If the jejunum is impacted by blunt force the emesis reflex (vomiting) will be initiated.

    Finally most of the melatonin comes from, not your head but your gastrointestinal tract. Melatonin is a hormone that induces sleep.
    Levels of melatonin rise as the body temperature falls, to encourage feelings of sleepiness. The opposite occurs to wake us up.

    “The concentration of melatonin in the gastrointestinal tissues surpasses blood levels by 10–100 times and there is at least 400× more melatonin in the gastrointestinal tract than in the pineal gland.”

  201. musea Says:

    Clearly there is a liver circadian rhythm based on digestion. Considering that, I thought of this. Doesn’t it make sense that sleep, the end of food digestion, be the best time to protect the body from dangers in our digestive tract? If sleep is about the digestive tract, then switching from day digestion to night immune processes would make sense and fit much of the facts.

    During the day we eat and digest our food. At night, during sleep, we stop eating and end digestion. Wouldn’t sleep, when there is no digestion going on, be the best time for the body to fight any dangers in the digestive tract? Remember the bulk of the body’s immune system is around the digestive tract.

    Then after waking, we have a bowel movement to excrete it out. And we are ready for a new day of digestion.
    Makes sense to me that day is eat and digest, and night is protect, repair, and get ready for the next day.
    Makes sense but is it true?

  202. musea Says:

    Concerning the new ideas on gut bacteria: thousands of years ago water was tainted with all kinds of pathogens. The intestinal tract would act as a major filter to clean up that water. So much so that the water taken from the colon in sleep, was probably the healthiest water you could get into your body. Still so I would think.

  203. musea Says:

    Many have suggestions for a healthy life that are fine, but most of these lists of suggestions seem geared to social human needs not biological human needs. For a happy life from a biological standpoint :
    1. Mother’s, breast feed your infants for one year. It’s the closest thing we have to a magic elixir.
    2. Children will go through trauma during puberty that will color the rest of their lives. Every one of them. We must help make this major life transition as easy as possible
    3. Get enough sleep.

  204. musea Says:

    Human nature may be the new frontier. Now I’m wondering if each of us doesn’t have a civil war inside – We have two parts of our body that are NOT in sync. Most of our body and mind is for us and our well being, the other that makes the sex hormones for reproduction. The body keeps them separate. Puberty is the first battle. Maybe it’s a bigger adjustment than most of us acknowledge – maybe that is the real Id and Ego.

  205. musea Says:

    Sleep – general idea: Why do we sleep? Ideas may be changing. It may be less about resting the mind, and more about ending digestion: stop eating, finish digestion, create hormones for the next day’s digestion, take necessary water from colon for digestion, prepare waste out.
    Then you see sleep as a necessary part of the digestive system daily cycle, to get food in and waste out. And you understand how not getting enough sleep would harm anyone.

  206. musea Says:

    Sleep idea of Dec. 2013 https://musea.wordpress.com/2013/12/28/why-do-we-sleep/

  207. musea Says:

    https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/01/03/why-nerds-that-dont-get-enough-sleep-will-always-be-bullied-or/

  208. musea Says:

    How could I miss something so obvious???? Today I saw the light. People talk of Freud’s oral/anal stages. Others talk of separation anxiety, or stranger anxiety in infant development. I talk of food in waste out as the biological stages of development. DUH!!!!!!!
    Today I saw the light

    oral = separation anxiety = food in stage

    anal = stranger anxiety = waste out stage.

    This is so obvious when you see it. But I could not see it. Nobody could! Freud thought there was a social aspect of oral/anal – it was a bio aspect that he and others were seeing.

    Now I would suggest that most animals may go through a similar 2 stage infant development process of first food in, then waste out.

  209. musea Says:

    Just for fun. Maybe when an infant is trying to rub his stomach and tap his head at the same time, he is – biologically speaking – touching his two main nervous systems, the enteric nervous system or gut brain, and the head brain.

  210. musea Says:

    Life as most stable reaction to environment. Instead of a magical wand, we have nothing. Out of the nothing the most stable chemical system remains. Life, now is defined, not as some chemical students wish list, or idea, but it’s the most stable response to the environment.
    What is stable lasts, what is unstable does not last. Life is the most stable, and more stable than the earth, sea, and air. Earth – techtonics have changed it, Air, no longer reducing, Oceans – sterilized through undersea thermal vents. Life , more stable than earth, air, water.
    Now define life as stable – stable in staying the same when that works, and changing to better fit a changing environment, when that works. So stable is a stable system that is flexible too.

    New paradigm of OOL? Life was not a fluke, the exact opposite, it was the most stable reaction to the environment. That changes everything in your discussion.

  211. musea Says:

    Where does entropy fit in?
    It probably wouldn’t affect the origin – life is in a very narrow range of liquid water, or 0-100C mostly (an easy way to look for life on other worlds). But entropy is one big deal too.
    I think the history of the universe is this: It starts as hot as it can get, and cools down. And at every level of lower temperature new processes emerge.

  212. musea Says:

    Don’t forget: sexual reproduction trumps all else even in humans. Our biological needs are more important than we acknowledge. To understand human evolution, we have to dig deeper than our social behavior, to our biological behavior. We share this with all other creatures, though often deny it’s importance.

  213. musea Says:

    Here is more support for the idea that there may be a gut flora gene transfer – even over centuries

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140227164534.htm

    The communities of phage within the coprolite were different, taxonomically, from communities seen within modern human fecal samples, but the functions they carry out appear to be conserved, says Desnues. That reinforces the hypothesis that the viral community plays a fundamental role within the human gastrointestinal tract, and one which remains unchanged after centuries, even while the human diet and other human conditions have been changing.

  214. musea Says:

    Origin of Life, – a different perspective

    Q. How do you define life?
    A. The most stable response to the environment when life began.

    Q. What is adjusting?
    A. Carbon compounds in a liquid water environment

    Q. What do they adjust to?
    A. The day/hot – night/cool cycle, and perhaps dry – then wet cycle too. Plus they adjust to UV light from the sun.

    Q. How do they adjust?
    A. What lasts in that environment is the most stable. With some carbon compounds more stable than others.
    In this case stable means two things: stable in what keeps it as it is, and stable in the ability to adjust in ways that improve it’s stability. Both metabolism and reproduction are ways to make life more stable.

    Q. LIfe seems fragile not stable.
    A. When we compare it to it’s environment: earth, sea, and atmosphere, we find that life has outlasted all 3 (excluding some zircon seeds). The earth has changed through plate tectonics, the atmosphere is no longer reducing, and the seas have been sterilized by undersea vents. Collective life is more stable and has outlasted all 3.

    So life is what is most stable in that early environment, with the ability to adjust to become better adapted to that environment or changes in that environment over time.

    Q. How does it adjust specifically?
    A. Through natural selection of better anabolic ( build up) or catabolic (break down) processes.

    Q. So every change in living things is toward a better anabolic or catabolic response to the environment?
    A. Yes. This suggests there is a direction in natural selection – always toward better anabolic and catabolic processes.

    Q. Why two directions?
    A. Anabolic and catabolic adjust or evolve, but they adjust separately and do not blend. There has never been found a time and place where anabolic processes are building up at the same time that catabolic processes are breaking down.

    Q. Do these two directions influence each other?
    A. They may. Positive change in an anabolic process, may put selection pressure on catabolic processes to catch up (or vice versa). Negative change in an anabolic process, may be mitigated by the stability of the catabolic processes in place (or vice versa.)

    Q. How does the information in DNA fit into this?
    A. The information being transferred is for more stability in the way outlined above.

  215. musea Says:

    From recent reading and studying I’m beginning to think that weaning is a major time of infant development.

    This loss of breast milk, may be a biological step – albeit a traumatic one – to trigger the infant to start his own immune system.

    Those fed with formula, don’t have this step, and never went through this, They have never developed this bio stage – of learning how to react to loss of needed fat and other concentrated nurturing (loss of breast milk). Which would force them to react by developing their own immune system.

    Perhaps a big part of that would be to learn how to conserve and store fats in a healthy way when it’s available, to cover times when it is scarce. Below are some of the clues that suggested this from around the web:

    Notes and Quotes :
    ==============

    a. These results confirm the protective effect of breast feeding and suggest there is a vulnerable period soon after breast feeding is stopped, which may be of relevance for developing preventive strategies.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8761225

    b. NOTE: studies show that there is a high mortality rate among infants during weaning.

    c. The high proportion of human infant fat is hypothesized to protect infant brains by mobilizing against growth disturbances caused by acute nutritional and pathogen stress during weaning.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.22431/abstract

    d. 4-8 MONTHS INFANT DEVELOPMENT Fat rolls (“Baby Fat”) appear on thighs, upper arms and neck.
    8-12 MONTHS Baby Fat” continues to appear on thighs, upper arms and neck.
    12-24 MONTHS Toddler will begin to lose the “Baby Fat” once he/she begins walking.

    e. NOTE: this period of the development of fat rolls from 6 months and beyond is also where weaning starts. It’s also where the antibiotics in the mother’s breast milk begin to reduce, while the child’s antibiotics begin to develop.

    Children are born with all three antibodies (IGG, IGA, and IGM). Because our immune system can’t make the most important antibody, IGG, in sufficient quantity until about six months, the baby is protected by IGG antibodies passed on by its mother before birth. If the baby’s own immune system doesn’t mature at the right time, the child may start a cycle of infections. This is often called “Transient Hypogammaglobulinemia of Infancy,” transient because the child will outgrow it, usually by age two or three, and Hypogammaglobulinemia because the IGG levels are low.
    http://www.atlantaallergy.com/educationdetail.aspx?id=17&cat=4

    f. Human milk also contains fats that are essential for the health of your baby. It is necessary for brain development, absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, and is a primary calorie source. Long chain fatty acids are needed for brain, retina, and nervous system development. They are deposited in the brain during the last trimester of pregnancy and are also found in breast milk.

    g. NOTE: Surely the infant would need a way to process fats during weaning in order to continue getting the fats he needs for all the development cited above.

  216. musea Says:

    FOUR BIOLOGICAL STEPS In Childhood Development;

    We often suggest steps to help children have happy lives . But most don’t take into consideration our biological needs. Here are 4 that I believe, should be included.

    1. Vaginal birth.
    2. Breast feeding
    3. Weaning
    4. Puberty

    1. The mother transfers her gut bacteria to the child through vaginal birth. If the newborn is denied that type of birth, then that child does not have the full gut biome he needs. This gene transfer of gut bacteria may even be a source of natural selection.

    2. I tend to think that breast feeding would solve many many problems that a majority of the world is having from being denied breast feeding. It’s the closest thing we have to a magic elixir.

    World Health Organization says: If every child was breastfed within an hour of birth, given only breast milk for their first six months of life, and continued breastfeeding up to the age of two years, about 800 000 child lives would be saved every year. Globally, less than 40% of infants under six months of age are exclusively breastfed.

    3. I also am beginning to think that weaning is very important. This loss of breast milk, may be a biological step – albeit a traumatic one – to trigger the infant to start his own immune system and to learn how to conserve needed fats. Those fed with formula, don’t have these steps.

    4. There is also the trauma of puberty for every child. That’s as big a trauma for humans as it is for caterpillars turning into butterflies.

    So, don’t forget these 4 biological steps. They may be more important than we can even imagine.

    Tom Hendricks
    (editor of the 21 year old zine Musea)

  217. musea Says:

    Blood Barrier connected to REM sleep?

    This is very interesting:
    I PUT THESE TWO IDEAS TOGETHER

    1.
    I suggested that
    NREM is body repair
    REM is mind repair.

    2.
    The blood barrier is in 3 places:
    blood – brain barrier (excluding the circumventrical organs = mostly lower brain)
    blood – ocular barrier
    blood – testes barrier

    AND GOT

    NREM, = body repair in the parts of the body without barriers
    REM = repair in the 3 parts of the blood barrier

    Note: REM is dreams in the mind, rapid eye movement, and testosterone production.

    This study seems to support that idea
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23713739

    “REM sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability”

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    BIOLOGICAL SPECULATIONS Through The Years http://wp.me/P5S9X-Pp
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  218. musea Says:

    This from a sci daily report
    http://news.sciencemag.org/biology/2013/11/new-reason-why-newborns-cant-fight-colds

    [In my case, I was told I had some serious ear infection as a child]

    WHY INFANTS MAY NOT HAVE A WORKING IMMUNE SYSTEM
    One of newborns’ biggest vulnerabilities is largely invisible: In the weeks after birth, babies are especially susceptible to infection because their immune systems aren’t fully functional. There are a handful of theories to explain this liability, and now a research team has added a new one to the list: Immune suppression in early life might help prevent inflammation in the infants’ intestines as they become colonized by the helpful bacteria they need to stay healthy.

    Newborns are more likely than older babies to catch, and die from, serious infections. The reason is fuzzy—indeed, there may be more than one explanation. One theory is that much like their brains, their lungs, and the rest of their bodies, infants’ immune systems just haven’t fully matured yet. Another is that both mothers-to-be and their in utero companions have suppressed immune systems, so that neither rejects the other. After birth, the thinking goes, it takes babies a month or so to boost their immunity.

  219. musea Says:

    Obesity epidemic

    Don’t forget that the amount of new mothers who do not breast feed (and I would suggest longer than the usual 6 months) ,is just about equal to the number of overweight. Surely this is a part of the problem. Search these two words for much much more “breast feeding + obesity”. Remember too that past generations have often not breast fed, so why weren’t they mostly overweight? I would suggest that they were poor, and could not eat enough to get fat , and/or they couldn’t easily access the inexpensive excess fats, sugars, and carbs that we can.
    I’ll also add that if you don’t breast feed your child, you won’t wean him from breast milk – and that may be a key biological step in our development. It may force the child to deal with loosing nurturing, setting up it’s own digestive system to deal with new foods, setting up it’s own immune system to get wastes out etc etc.

  220. musea Says:

    When the Gut Biome is Not Yet Set up in the newborn child – What’s the importance of allowing a gut biome to fully set up in the newborn.

    The newborn needs both vaginal birth and breast milk to transfer all the mother’s good gut bacteria into the infant.

    Then the child needs time to allow that gut bacteria to settle and multiply.
    (Note the infants infection fighting process is not yet active in the first 6 months and most immunity comes from the mother. Most likely this is to allow the good gut bacteria to take hold without the child’s defense system attacking it.

    But if the child doesn’t have vaginal birth, or doesn’t have breast milk and has formula instead, or doesn’t receive breast milk long enough; he does not have the necessary gut biome to

    1. help to excrete out waste (anal trauma)
    2. help to digest first foods. (oral trauma)

  221. musea Says:

    Now this is very interesting. I found out that breast milk also supplies insulin!

    Perhaps without breast milk, or weaning too soon, the infant does not get the insulin it needs, in the correct amount, to allow him to best use the glucose he needs during development and into being an adult!

    Quote
    We have shown that human milk contains insulin in substantial concentrations, while insulin is barely detectable (if at all) in infant formulas. Orally administered insulin was demonstrated to promote gut maturation and to reduce intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Furthermore, oral insulin may induce tolerance to insulin and protect against the development of type 1 diabetes. We herewith raise a hypothesis that human milk is protective against the development of type 1 diabetes by virtue of the effects of its substantial content of insulin.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15016183

  222. musea Says:

    More on where the infant gets his gut bacteria. This suggests some comes from the placenta
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/22/health/study-sees-bigger-role-for-placenta-in-newborns-health.html?emc=edit_au_20140521&nl=afternoonupdate&nlid=60969813&_r=1

  223. musea Says:

    Seems to me that we have a new way to transfer genes here that is outside the genome.
    Transfer bacteria from mother to child (transfer her bacterial genes to child’s gut)

    Here is another study and a quote from it
    http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/40038/title/The-Maternal-Microbiome/

    Quote: While many questions remain, it’s pretty much taken for granted that the microbial communities of the placenta, vagina, and breast milk are important for fetal and infant development.

  224. musea Says:

    Study shows brain cleaning through sleep:
    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/index.cfm?id=3956

    Quote
    The new findings hinge on the discovery last year by Nedergaard and her colleagues of a previously unknown system of waste removal that is unique to the brain. The system responsible for disposing cellular waste in the rest of the body, the lymphatic system, does not extend to the brain. This is because the brain maintains its own closed “ecosystem” and is protected by a complex system molecular gateways – called the blood-brain barrier – that tightly control what enters and exits the brain.

    My take
    Sleep was first a chance to end the eating/digestion period, regroup needed water and hormones for next day digestion, and prepare waste out -bowel movement.

    This evolved to include a brain resting period to clean out the brain (See study and video above) But more exactly a cleaning out of all BBB blood brain barrier places (brain, testes, eyes, ears, joints, spine)

    Now why the NREM and REM?
    My first guess is NREM is ‘house maintenance’ that includes getting digestive tract ready, flush all BBB sites, and deliver some hormones.
    REM is waste out or a type of flush out of waste after the NREM period.

    Tom

  225. musea Says:

    The most likely reason for sleep has nothing to do with the brain directly – but is first based on finishing the daily digestive system – it came first. Look to the ENS, enteric nervous system or gut brain. Sleep stops eating, finishes digestion, prepares hormones and retrieves needed water, for the next day’s digestion, and prepares waste out.
    Evolving out of that is waste out of the brain. See the Univ. of Rochester study.
    That further suggests that the cleansing of the brain, may carry over to not only the blood brain barrier area, but all the blood barrier areas, including testes, spine, and parts of the eyes and ears etc.
    Notice also the connection between NREM and parasympathetic, and REM and sympathetic. These points are important too.

  226. musea Says:

    Suggestion that Two Parts Sleep NREM/REM correlate to Glymphatic Cleaning and Flush of Toxins of Brain and Blood Brain Areas

    Figure out why we sleep and that will answer many questions. But why we sleep is very tough to answer.
    Taking the glymphatic cleaning idea (see above) further.

    1. Why in sleep?
    Q: One of the clues hinting that the glymphatic system may be more active during sleep was the fact that the amount of energy consumed by the brain does not decrease dramatically while we sleep. Because pumping CSF demands a great deal of energy, researchers speculated that the process of cleaning may not be compatible with the functions the brain must perform when we are awake and actively processing information. AND
    Q. Through a series of experiments in mice, the researchers observed that the glymphatic system was almost 10-fold more active during sleep and that the sleeping brain removed significantly more amyloid-beta.

    2. Could this go beyond the area of the blood brain/spine barrier to other blood barriers (testis, eyes, ears, joints). Therefore sleep centers on blood barrier areas, while the lymphatic system does the rest. Then the question is – is that enough reason for 8 hours sleep!

    Q. The system responsible for disposing cellular waste in the rest of the body, the lymphatic system, does not extend to the brain. This is because the brain maintains its own closed “ecosystem” and is protected by a complex system molecular gateways – called the blood-brain barrier – that tightly control what enters and exits the brain.

    3. This seems like a two part process. 1. After the brain cells shrink 60 % cerebral spinal fluid is pumped through the brain’s tissue, then 2. the waste is flushed back into the circulatory system where it enters the blood circulation system and goes to the liver.

    Q. Another startling finding was that the cells in the brain “shrink” by 60 percent during sleep. This contraction creates more space between the cells and allows CSF to wash more freely through the brain tissue. In contrast, when awake the brain’s cells are closer together, restricting the flow of CSF. AND
    Q. Using these techniques, researchers were able to observe in mice – whose brains are remarkably similar to humans – what amounts to a plumbing system that piggybacks on the brain’s blood vessels and pumps cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) through the brain’s tissue, flushing waste back into the circulatory system where it eventually makes its way to the general blood circulation system and, ultimately, the liver.

    4. Could this two part process 1. cleaning the brain (and all blood barrier areas>). 2. flushing the toxins relate to the two stages of sleep NREM (80% sleep) and REM (20% sleep) such that
    NREM – 80% – cleaning the brain (and other blood barrier areas)
    REM – 20% – flushing waste back into the circulatory system and to the liver.

    Finding the answer to why we sleep will open all kinds of doors to our health and well being, and our understanding of many aspects of our life

    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/index.cfm?id=3956

    Final Quote:. The pathway consists of a para-arterial influx route for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to enter the brain parenchyma, coupled to a clearance mechanism for the removal of interstitial fluid (ISF) and extracellular solutes from the interstitial compartments of the brain and spinal cord. Exchange of solutes between the CSF and the ISF is driven by arterial pulsation and regulated during sleep by the expansion and contraction of brain extracellular space.

  227. musea Says:

    There may be a connection between weaning a baby too soon, constipation, and the anal retentive personality.

    My suggestion is that when the infant is weaned too soon, his body reacts to the loss of breast milk and easily digested nurturing, by constipation to hold in the last digestible nurturing he got.

    This turns out to be a very common problem – constipation during weaning.

    But this biologically caused constipation may in turn become the anal retentive personality type. Therefore it has nothing to do with toilet training, but instead is a biological problem during weaning.

    Definition from the Free Dictionary
    Anal retentive personality – (psychoanalysis) a personality characterized by meticulous neatness and suspicion and reserve; said to be formed in early childhood by fixation during the anal stage of development (usually as a consequence of toilet training)

  228. musea Says:

    Why do we sleep? Why do we have chronic pain?

    Suggestion that sleep is to cleanse all the areas of the body that have blood barriers.
    Suggestion that without sleep, chronic pain develops in these blood barrier areas.

    Sleep may be key for reducing pain. Sleep may be to cleanse those areas outside of the blood stream, or blood barriers.

    There is a study that shows that during sleep the blood brain area is cleared through the glymphatic system (see below) . I suggest that this extends to the other blood barrier areas in the body too and that is why we sleep.

    blood brain barrier (headaches)
    blood spine barrier (back problems)
    blood eye barrier (eye strain)
    blood ear barrier (ear aches)
    blood joint barriers (joint pain)
    blood germ cell areas (sexual dysfunction)

    Suggestion that the body, during sleep, works from head down and repeats the process 4 or 5 times a night – 4 or 5 cycles of NREM then REM.

    NREM (80% of the time) active glymphatic system in blood barriers in brain, eyes, ears, (head area)
    REM (20% of the time) active glymphatic system in blood barriers in spine, germ cells, joints. (body area)

    BRAIN – BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER
    SPINAL CORD – BLOOD SPINAL CHORD BARRIER
    EYES – BLOOD RETINAL BARRIER
    INNER EAR – BLOOD LABYRINTH BARRIER
    PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM – BLOOD NERVE BARRIER
    JOINTS – BLOOD SYNOVIAL BARRIER
    TESTIS – BLOOD TESTIS BARRIER

    Report on Glymphatic system, brain, and sleep.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815142042.htm

  229. musea Says:

    Biological basis for happiness?

    This is speculation, but it seems likely that happiness may be something naturally selected for.
    For example we feel happy after we eat, after sex, around newborn babies and cute kids, etc.
    That would support eating enough, procreating, and raising children.

  230. musea Says:

    This is a diagram showing hydrogen bonds.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140715141755.htm

    Remember one of my contentions about why we have 4 bases is that that is two sets.

    The two sets are different in that G-C has 3 hydrogen bonds, and A-T two.
    That means that each has a slight selection advantage.
    The G-C is slightly more stable and will denature at a higher temp.
    The A-T is slightly less stable, more active, and will denature at a lower temp

    Tom Hendricks

    BIOLOGY HYPOTHESIS http://wp.me/p5S9X-eO
    BIOLOGICAL SPECULATIONS Through The Years http://wp.me/P5S9X-Pp
    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  231. musea Says:

    Michaelian Paper on UV and Origin Of Life
    This paper supports a lot of my speculation on UV, that I wrote on David Darling’s science website, and more importantly may be a real breakthrough on how life began. It takes a look at life through UV dissipation as a selective force. This is very exciting! Thanks to JHC for sending it to me.

    Fundamental Molecules of Life are Pigments which Arose and Evolved to Dissipate the Solar Spectrum, Michaelian, Simeonov

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.4059

    This is My UV paper – speculation on how UV was the main source of energy to drive the origin of life written many years ago.

    http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html

  232. musea Says:

    Lots of talk about our gut microbes (the foreign bugs that live on us have 10 times more DNA than our body). Mostly the talk is that the gut microbes call the shots, and we have to get the right ones to be healthy. But the host, us, are not without control. As I’ve said all along, and this study shows, it’s the other way around, and the gut biome is mostly controlled by the host, again us!

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140807145744.htm

  233. musea Says:

    Fight or flight may have evolved as a low glucose trauma.

  234. musea Says:

    Looks like this author’s idea of stability is a lot like mine.

    http://aeon.co/magazine/science/stability-how-life-began-and-why-it-cant-rest/

    My blog post.

    https://musea.wordpress.com/2014/03/10/the-origin-of-life-a-different-perspective/

  235. musea Says:

    Could an unconscious fear of infection be a driving force in human behavior? If so how did it evolve?

    This article from Psychology Today suggests a strong unconscious fear of infection.
    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/sex-murder-and-the-meaning-life/201106/do-unconscious-fears-infection-affect-your-social-life

    Could sexual relations partly be to not only mix genes, but mix each others bacteria in a way that helps each support the good bacteria they have, defend against the bad that they have, and trade bacteria in a way that makes each more healthy and compatible with the other?

  236. musea Says:

    Separation Anxiety/ Stranger Anxiety = Infection trauma in infants?
    Both Separation anxiety and stranger anxiety may partly be based on the body reacting to both good and bad bacteria.
    Separation anxiety: May be in part the infant’s fear of loosing his mother’s immune system, while his is still developing
    Stranger anxiety: May be in part, the infant’s fear of stranger germs.

  237. musea Says:

    Jeff Lliff ted talk on sleep as brain cleaning, and how it’s done.

    My suggestion is that this brain cleaning carries over to all blood barriers ( brain and spine, parts of the ears, eyes, male testes, joints.
    That it correlates to
    NREM sleep for brain and spine cleaning
    REM sleep for rest of body cleaning of blood barrier areas. (If not how are they cleaned – the same question asked of them as asked of cleaning the brain of waste)
    That sleep is not for the brain alone, but includes resetting the digestive system (we can’t eat and sleep at the same time), and preparing all body waste out for wake up.

  238. musea Says:

    This from science news:
    When Daphnia magna molts, its discarded body armor, can carry away harmful bacteria, a new study finds. The work is the first to show that molting can safeguard against parasites, says evolutionary biologist David Duneau of Cornell University.

    More and more I see much of the defenses of living things geared toward dangerous bacteria.

  239. musea Says:

    More and more I see that our main emotions evolved from basic biological aspects of life.

    Anger = the body’s reaction to not enough nurturing.

    Fear = the body’s reaction to infection and all trauma with getting waste out

  240. musea Says:

    Suggested that the key to the origin of life is that both DNA and RNA denatures and anneals at certain high temperatures in a sun/night daily cycle; and

    That each set G-C, and A-U (RNA), or A-T (DNA) denature at different temperatures.

    This went on every day until the most “stable arrangement for that environment” was achieved (stable in two ways – the ability to keep what was good, and change what was not).

    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  241. musea Says:

    Dr. Nedergaard.

    Three questions about your important paper on the Glymphatic system:

    1. Do you know if this happens during NREM sleep, or REM sleep, or both?

    2. Do you know if this happens at other blood barrier points besides the brain, such as the blood spinal chord barrier, blood retinal barrier, etc.

    3. With 40% of the glymph wash being recycled, does that mean the glymph is also nurturing in some ways? We sleep for 8 hours.
    That is a lot of recycling of glymph.

    Your discovery is an exciting one. Best wishes,
    Tom Hendricks

    UV PAPER http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/U/UV_origin_of_life.html
    Catabolic and Anabolic evolved, but they did not blend.

  242. musea Says:

    This article looks at meteorites in a new way

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150114140527.htm

    Does that change the bombardment scenario and OOL timeline? Thoughts?

  243. musea Says:

    Muscle atonia during REM sleep

    Some suggest that we are paralyzed with muscle atonia in REM sleep to make sure we don’t act out our nightmares. I think it is just the opposite. Muscle atonia causes the nightmares.

    REM sleep is one part of the nightly glymphatic cleanse of the brain (perhaps mostly the parts of the brain not including the cerebrtum). During that period the part of the brain that controls muscles seems to be ‘out for cleansing’ and that part of the body is paralyzed.

    The nightmares may be just a reflection of that paralysis. The nightmares put into visual pictures the bodies shut down during REM sleep, of muscles due to the brain ‘closed’ for cleaning.:”

    During this time body temperature approaches that of the environment. That may be because muscle atonia has stopped the muscles from producing body heat that comes from muscle movement -70% of body heat.

  244. musea Says:

    Let’s take the premise that life has to have a specific atmosphere (in a Goldilocks zone). That atmosphere demands a gravity that is not too much (like Jupiter) not too little (like the Moon). Let’s say life has to have water. Then the planet has to be within a certain temp zone. Start putting these all together and you find a lot of limits – and within those limits there are only so many ways you can fly, swim, burrow, and walk. In other words aliens will most likely be on a planet with water temperature, gravity like ours, etc.

  245. musea Says:

    Convergent life.

    This is an idea that combines two others.

    First one from the biological texts:

    1. Convergent evolution is the independent evolution of similar features in different species.

    Combine that with one of my ideas:

    2. There is a direction in evolution toward better catabolic and anabolic processes. [Catabolic and anabolic chemical processes evolved but did not blend.
    When there is a mutation on either catabolic or anabolic processes, there is selection pressure on the other to match the good mutation, or mitigate the bad one.]

    3. Convergent LIfe (or convergent catabolic and anabolic processes)

    That suggest to me that in any similar environment, all life will converge on the best catabolic and anabolic processes.
    OR
    natural selection will always select similar catabolic and anabolic processes for similar environments.

  246. musea Says:

    http://www.rh.gatech.edu/news/58047/study-adding-uv-light-helps-form-missing-g-rna-building-blocks

  247. musea Says:

    The (Combination Problem) combinatorial problem, the problem of how – given the enormous number of possible combinations – the components of protein molecules could come together to fashion the proteins of living organisms.”
    Extraterrestrials, Science and Alien Intelligence, editoed by Edward Regis Jr.

    Stability solves this problem. Those proteins that lasted, were chemically selected for lasting. Those that didn’t last ceased to exist.

  248. musea Says:

    Life popped out of nothing in a one in a billion fluke event. Then with the least amount of defenses in its genetic structure it survived one of the most harsh environments in Earth’s history. That makes sense?
    No the opposite does. Life is the chemical system that was the most adapted to that environment. It was chemically selected as the most stable response to the environment and that kept it from being destroyed, allowed it to continue and then to prosper.

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